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    NRS Form 990 Review

    NRS Review of Form 990 for 2017 In December 2018, the NRS published its Form 990 for 2017. This year marks the fourth highest banner year in donations, the first highest banner year was in 1998 which the donations totaled over $1 million dollars ($1,148,375). In 2017, the NRS received in donations $929,730.00, just $216,645 short of its 1998 banner year. So let's review what the NRS spent its donations on. First off, let's be clear that Samuel B Huff, Director, signed off on page one of the 2017 Form 990, and on page 7, under the heading, Part VII, Compensation, it shows that Samuel B Huff, President, was paid $119,100 under the column, Reported compensation from related organizations. Also Mary F Erhard, Secretary, was paid $27,963 making a grand total here of $147,063. Grants spent this year on rosacea totaled $74,443. So if you do the math, the total spent on rosacea research grants in 2017 amounts to 8% of the total revenue donated to the NRS. Putting this into something you can understand a little clearer, for every dollar donated to the NRS 8 cents was spent on rosacea research grants. What did the NRS spend the rest of the money on? On page 10, Part IX, Expenses, it shows a list totalying $763,980. Of that total, $105,494 was spent on Information Technology. You can read the rest yourself. Scrolling down to Schedule R (Form 990) Part V, you will note there are two corporations listed under TRANSACTIONS WITH RELATED ORGANIZATIONS, which are the following: Glendale Communications Group, Inc. $498,910. Park Mailing and Fulfillment, Inc. $70,194.00 The above two corporations is where a total of $569,104 was spent which are the related organizations the NRS used and this amounts to 61% of its total donations received. These two private corporations are owned by Samuel B Huff, the Director/President of the NRS. For proof, read this post. Read the NRS Form 990 for 2017: nrs_990_2017.pdf
  3. Related Articles Giant rhinophyma in low-resource setting: a case report. Int J Dermatol. 2017 Aug;56(8):875-877 Authors: Antunes M, Frasson G, Ottaviano G, Schiavone M, Pizzol D PMID: 28650103 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
  4. Dietary supplementation with turmeric polyherbal formulation decreases facial redness: a randomized double-blind controlled pilot study. J Integr Med. 2018 Nov 22;: Authors: Vaughn AR, Pourang A, Clark AK, Burney W, Sivamani RK Abstract BACKGROUND: Facial redness is multifactorial in nature and may be a sign of many different conditions, including rosacea, photo damage and flushing. Herbal medicines have been used for thousands of years to treat a variety of dermatological conditions. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) and its constituents have been shown to mediate dilation and constriction of peripheral arterioles and have demonstrated anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of turmeric and turmeric-containing polyherbal combination tablets versus placebo on facial redness. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND INTERVENTIONS: This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized pilot study. Thirty-three healthy participants were recruited from the dermatology clinic at the University of California, Davis and nearby community from 2016 to 2017. Thirty participants were enrolled, and 28 participants completed the study. The enrolled participants were randomized to receive one of three interventions (placebo, turmeric or polyherbal combination tablets) and were told to take the intervention tablets by mouth twice daily for 4 weeks. Facial redness was assessed at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention by clinical grading and by image-based analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was image-based facial quantification of redness using a research camera and software analysis system. The investigators performed an intention-to-treat analysis by including all subjects who were enrolled in the trial and received any study intervention. Differences were considered statistically significant after accounting for multiple comparisons. Effect sizes for clinical grading were calculated with a Hedges' g where indicated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight participants completed the study and there were no reported adverse events. Based on clinical grading, facial redness intensity and distribution down trended in the polyherbal combination group after 4 weeks (P = 0.1). Under photographic image analysis, the polyherbal combination group had a significant decrease in redness of 40% compared to baseline (P = 0.03). The placebo and turmeric groups had no statistically significant changes in image analysis-based facial redness. CONCLUSION: Polyherbal combination tablet supplementation improved facial redness compared to the turmeric or placebo. Overall, our findings suggested further investigations into the effects of turmeric and polyherbal formulations in skin conditions associated with facial redness would be warranted. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03065504. PMID: 30527287 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  5. Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Cutaneous Tuberculosis. Am J Dermatopathol. 2018 Nov 27;: Authors: Maldonado-Bernal C, Ramos-Garibay A, Rios-Sarabia N, Serrano H, Carrera M, Navarrete-Franco G, Jurado-Santacruz F, Isibasi A Abstract The role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the etiology and pathogenesis of cutaneous tuberculosis is controversial because of the difficulties associated with demonstrating the presence of these mycobacteria in tuberculid cutaneous lesions by routinely available microbiological and histological techniques. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the presence of M. tuberculosis in cutaneous tuberculosis. Multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by nested PCR was used to amplify genomic fragments from 3 different mycobacteria species. DNA was isolated from 30 paraffin-embedded skin biopsies. Samples were selected randomly from patients with a clinical and histopathological diagnosis of the most frequent groups of cutaneous tuberculosis in Mexico as follows: 5 cases of scrofuloderma tuberculosis; 2 cases of lupus vulgaris tuberculosis; and 5 cases of tuberculosis verrucosa cutis. The other cases denominated tuberculids in some countries such as Mexico and included the following: 7 cases of rosacea-like tuberculosis; one case of papulonecrotic tuberculosis; and 10 cases of erythema induratum of Bazin. Four normal skin biopsies were included as controls. M. tuberculosis DNA was amplified successfully by nested PCR in 80% of the samples (24 of the 30 samples) assayed. Mycobacterial DNA was not detected in the normal skin biopsies used as controls. Detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in 80% of cutaneous tuberculosis analyzed implicates this mycobacterium in the pathogenesis of multiple clinical forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID: 30531542 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  6. Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2007;20:199–210 DOI: 10.1159/000101807 Beneficial Long-Term Effects of Combined Oral/Topical Antioxidant Treatment with the Carotenoids Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Human Skin: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study P. Palombo, G. Fabrizi, V. Ruocco, E. Ruocco, J. Fluhr, R. Roberts, P. Morganti
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    Volunteering

    From 1998 through 2005 there was an incredible volunteer spirit that drove the formation of the RRDi. Since 2005 the force that motivated so many to bring together rosacea sufferers into a non profit organization has dwindled to just a flickering wick. Why is it that rosaceans (rosacea sufferers) don't volunteer anymore? Andy Seth, an entrepreneur, has a blog post, The Way We Think About Volunteering Is Dead Wrong, states, "research shows that the happiest volunteers are those who give 2 hours per week. That’s it. 2 hours." If the RRDi could get any rosacean to volunteer 2 hours a weeks, that would be miraculous. Are there volunteers who actually volunteer that many hours a week? There must be, otherwise the study is bogus. If we could get any RRDi member to just post their thought or experience with rosacea for 15 minutes a week that would be incredible. We have dotted the RRDi forum with requests to RRDi members to simply post anything and the 1200 plus members as of this date are simply miniscule when it comes to posting. Getting our members to post is a challenge. If you have some insight how to get our members to post, we are all ears. You can reply to this post and comment to your heart's content. Of course, that is the issue, the RRDi members' hearts are not content to post. Why is that? The research Mr. Seth referred to may have been the study commented on by the American Psychological Association that reports, "Volunteers lived longer than people who didn't volunteer if they reported altruistic values or a desire for social connections as the main reasons for wanting to volunteer, according to the study." This same study, Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis, the co-author concludes: "It is reasonable for people to volunteer in part because of benefits to the self; however, our research implies that should these benefits to the self become the main motive for volunteering, they may not see those benefits." One of the benefits is what is called 'helper's high' which has been scientifically confirmed. [1] Of course, if a RRDi member who has rosacea helps another rosacea sufferer that would be the basis for receiving the 'helper's high.' Rosaceans supporting rosaceans. In trying to understand why volunteering amongst rosaceans has continued on this downward course, and googling this for an answer, The Guardian has an article about this subject and concluded, "But while the benefits of volunteering are clear, there is worrying evidence that the people who could benefit most from giving their time are precisely those least likely to be involved." Volunteer Match (which the RRDi has joined) has an article on this subject and states that the Bureau of Labor Statistics Report shows "that volunteer rates have been steadily declining for over a decade," [2] and comments, "There’s an endless supply of reasons that could explain why volunteer rates are falling. Last year, upon seeing the results, VolunteerMatch President Greg Baldwin argued that volunteer rates are falling because we as a nation don’t invest enough resources in the nonprofit sector. Without resources, nonprofits simply don’t have the capacity to effectively engage volunteers. Someone in the comments of that post argued that the falling rates can be attributed to the fact that more people are overworked with less time on their hands. Others say people are simply lazier than they used to be. I personally think it could be attributed to a shifting trend away from community involvement, due to the emergence of online communities, young people moving more often, and other factors." [3] In the above article mentioned [3] there are a number of comments and I think Ron from Florida's [April 16, 2016] comment is insightful: "When I was younger, volunteering and giving back was part of life. It was something that we did and didn’t think twice about it. I don’t see that same philosophy these days. It’s to the point that schools here require some level of community service to complete your graduation requirements." Stem Learning reports, "It is suggested that stagnating volunteer numbers and in some areas, reducing numbers of volunteers, along with cuts made by local authorities falling disproportionately upon the volunteering sector funding, suggests a potential fall in people volunteering per se. Furthermore the 2015/16 Community Life survey, highlighted 14.2 million people formally volunteered at least once a month in 2014/15 and although rates are mostly unchanged, it appears irregular volunteering appear to show a 5% drop!" Carey Nieuwhof lists 6 REASONS YOU'RE LOSING HIGH CAPACITY VOLUNTEERS. I don't see how those six reasons are related to the RRDi, but I am all ears to anyone who can point out to me what the RRDi isn't doing or not doing with regard to Carey's six reasons. Our page on volunteering covers most of what Carey is discussing. Without a doubt this explains the situation. Any thoughts on this subject would be much appreciated. Online Volunteering Dr. Natalie Hruska says that the studies indicating a drop in volunteering over the past decade "do not factor in kinds of volunteerism today, like virtual volunteering" and writes there is "a necessity to redefine what volunteerism is and how we understand it today." [4] Volunteering Statistics "About 25 percent of Americans volunteered in 2015, according to federal data, compared to a global average of just 10 percent." [5] "The volunteering rate has declined slightly from 27 percent in 2002 despite the efforts of many American leaders..." [5] End Notes [1] Helper's High: The Benefits (and Risks) of Altruism, Psychology Today [2] According to the 2015 report, 24.9% of the U.S. population over the age of 16 volunteered at least once in the past year. In 2011, this percentage was 26.8%, and in 2005 it was 28.8%. "The volunteer rate declined by 0.4 percentage point to 24.9 percent for the year ending in September 2015..." VOLUNTEERING IN THE UNITED STATES — 2015, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Thursday, February 25, 2016 [3] The U.S. Volunteer Rate Is Still Dropping. Why?, Tess Srebro | March 25, 2016 | Industry Research | Engaging Volunteers, Volunteer Match [4] Dr. Natalie Hruska, April 12, 2016 POST to the article in end note 2. Dr. Hruska has a video below that discusses online volunteering: Dr. Hruska has written a book on this subject, Managing the First Global Technology: Reflections on a relevant application of the Internet, in Kindle or Paperback. [5] How to get more Americans to volunteer, The Conversation Civil society organization workforce as a share of the economically active population, by country, 1995-2000, John Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies [6]
  9. Dr. Ben Johnson, RRDi MAC Member, discusses a holistic approach to treating rosacea in an interview with Lori Crete, Licensed Esthetician, Spa 10.
  10. I had a mole on my forehead that I was told that 3% Hydrogen Peroxided might remove, so I dabbed a little on the mole and after some weeks it did indeed remove the mole. However, I noticed that the rosacea or seb derm on my forehead that was near the mole also cleared up. So I experimented and began putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on my red spots on my forehead and after some days they began to fade away too! Since then I have been putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on all my facial rosacea red spots and letting it dry, then adding the ZZ cream, just before bed and this regimen seems to really work for me. I also have taking the Lutein/Zeazanthin 40 mg capsule each day. I also avoid sugar as much as possible and eat very low carbohydrate.
  11. Admin

    Placebo Effect

    An interesting article in The New York Times Magazine states, "Enough people reported good results that patients were continually lined up at Mesmer’s door waiting for the next session." Dr. Mesmer is where the word mesmerize comes from. The article explains how 'double blind' placebo controlled clinical studies originated and why drug companies have to differentiate between a drug's actual pharmaceutical effect and the placebo effect. I particularly like this paragraph in the article: "What if, Hall wonders, a treatment fails to work not because the drug and the individual are biochemically incompatible, but rather because in some people the drug interferes with the placebo response, which if properly used might reduce disease? Or conversely, what if the placebo response is, in people with a different variant, working against drug treatments, which would mean that a change in the psychosocial context could make the drug more effective? Everyone may respond to the clinical setting, but there is no reason to think that the response is always positive. According to Hall’s new way of thinking, the placebo effect is not just some constant to be subtracted from the drug effect but an intrinsic part of a complex interaction among genes, drugs and mind. And if she’s right, then one of the cornerstones of modern medicine — the placebo-controlled clinical trial — is deeply flawed."What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?, The New York Times Magazine
  12. Admin

    Rosacea Diet

    Rosacea Diet Triggers always come up in a discussion of rosacea. Just about every dermatologist parrots the NRS list of proposed rosacea diet triggers, especially physicians explain to their patients to avoid "spicy food and wine." There is a much longer trigger factor list that include other proposed food and drink triggers. An interesting read is Liver, Yogurt, Sour Cream, Cheese, Eggplant, and Spinach that discusses this subject. There are some who can eat anything and their skin looks great. This is probably due to genetics. There is a theory that rosacea is genetic and we have simply been dealt with a bad set of rosacea prone genes. Whether diet really does affect rosacea or acne, do you think that eating a diet with the proper proportion of protein, fat, carbohydrate and essential nutrients improves health? If a person has a poor diet without a proper proportion of the three food groups and lacks the essential nutrients, would that effect the skin? The Rosacea Diet that I have proposed since 1999 you can obtain for free if you join the RRDi and mention when joining you want a free copy and explains in detail what to ingest and what to avoid for just 30 days to see if this improves your skin. Most rosacea sufferers will not do this because it means reducing your carbohydrate intake to 30 grams a day for 30 days, a task that very few are willing to undertake because sugar is addictive. Also due to a misunderstanding on what carbohydrate actually is, many think that carbohydrate is an essential nutrient which is far from the truth. The Rosacea Diet is simply a short test that clearly shows whether reducing carbohydrate for thirty days helps clear your skin. After this simple test one can modify carbohydrate intake according to one's individual situation and may be able to use this method to help control your rosacea, because in RF you will find that the majority will tell you that diet does indeed affect rosacea and acne. While there are a few who claim diet doesn't have anything to do with rosacea, these are definitely in the minority. It would be good to substantiate this in a poll, but the NRS has already done that with its survey asking what food and drink triggers your rosacea and came up with the 'official' diet trigger list which all the dermatologists parrot, namely 'spicy food and wine.' Did the NRS even mention sugar or carbohydrate in its poll? No. The NRS avoids mentioning sugar or carbohydrate as a rosacea diet trigger. The RRDi does list sugar and carbohydrate as rosacea diet triggers.
  13. Related Articles [Not Available]. Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946 Jan;53:67 Authors: LENTZ JW PMID: 21065801 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
  14. Related Articles [Not Available]. Prensa Med. 1946;6(2):10-2 Authors: VEINTEMILLA F, DEL CASTILLO H PMID: 20991596 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
  15. Use of an Alternative Method to Evaluate Erythema Severity in a Clinical Trial: Difference in Vehicle Response With Evaluation of Baseline and Postdose Photographs for Effect of Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Erythema of Rosacea in a Phase 4 Study. Br J Dermatol. 2018 Nov 30;: Authors: Eichenfield LF, Del Rosso JQ, Tan JKL, Hebert AA, Webster GF, Harper J, Baldwin HE, Kircik LH, Stein-Gold L, Kaoukhov A, Alvandi N Abstract BACKGROUND: Once-daily topical oxymetazoline cream 1.0% significantly reduced persistent facial erythema of rosacea in trials requiring live, static patient assessments. OBJECTIVE: To critically evaluate the methodology of clinical trials that require live, static patient assessments by determining whether assessment of erythema is different when reference to the baseline photograph is allowed. METHODS: In two identically designed, randomised, phase 3 trials, adults with persistent facial erythema of rosacea applied oxymetazoline or vehicle once daily. This phase 4 study evaluated standardised digital facial photographs from the phase 3 trials to record ≥1-grade Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) improvement at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose. RESULTS: Among 835 patients (oxymetazoline n=415, vehicle n=420), significantly greater proportions of patients treated with oxymetazoline versus vehicle (P<0.0001) achieved ≥1-grade CEA improvement (up to 85.3% vs 29.8%). When reference to baseline photographs was allowed while evaluating posttreatment photographs, the results for oxymetazoline were similar to results of the phase 3 trials, but a significantly lower proportion of vehicle recipients achieved ≥1-grade CEA improvement (up to 52.3% vs 29.7%; P<0.001). Up to 80.2% of oxymetazoline patients achieved at least moderate erythema improvement, versus up to 22.9% of vehicle patients. The association between patients' satisfaction with facial skin redness and percentage of erythema improvement was statistically significant (Spearman rank correlation, 0.1824; P<0.0001 [oxymetazoline]; 0.0623; P=0.01 [vehicle]). CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of study photographs, with comparison to baseline, confirmed significant erythema reduction with oxymetazoline on the first day of application. Compared to the phase 3 trials results, significantly fewer vehicle recipients attained ≥1-grade CEA improvement, inferring a mitigated vehicle effect. This methodology may improve the accuracy of clinical trials evaluating erythema severity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30500065 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  16. Topical Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Pooled Analysis of the Two Phase 3, 29-Day, Randomized, Controlled REVEAL Trials J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Nov 01;17(11):1201-1208 Authors: Stein-Gold L, Kircik L, Draelos ZD, Werschler P, DuBois J, Lain E, Baumann L, Goldberg D, Kaufman J, Tanghetti E, Ahluwalia G, Alvandi N, Weng E, Berk D Abstract Background: Rosacea is a chronic dermatologic condition with limited treatment options. Methods: Data were pooled from two identically designed phase 3 trials. Patients with moderate to severe persistent erythema of rosacea were randomized to receive oxymetazoline cream 1.0% or vehicle once daily for 29 days and were followed for 28 days posttreatment. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients with ≥2-grade improvement from baseline on both Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) and Subject Self-Assessment (SSA) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose, day 29. Results: The pooled population included 885 patients (78.8% female); 85.8% and 91.2% had moderate erythema based on CEA and SSA, respectively. The primary outcome was achieved by significantly more patients in the oxymetazoline than vehicle group (P<0.001). Individual CEA and SSA scores and reduction in facial erythema (digital image analysis) favored oxymetazoline over vehicle (P<0.001). The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was low (oxymetazoline, 16.4%; vehicle, 11.8%). No clinically relevant erythema worsening (based on CEA and SSA) was observed during the 28-day posttreatment follow-up period (oxymetazoline, 1.7%; vehicle, 0.6%). Conclusion: Oxymetazoline effectively reduced moderate to severe persistent facial erythema of rosacea and was well tolerated. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(11):1201-1208. PMID: 30500142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  17. Related Articles Rosacea-specific quality of life questionnaire: translation, cultural adaptation and validation for Brazilian Portuguese. An Bras Dermatol. 2018 Nov/Dec;93(6):836-842 Authors: Tannus FC, Picosse FR, Soares JM, Bagatin E Abstract BACKGROUND: Brazil does not have a rosacea-specific quality of life questionnaire. OBJECTIVES: translation into Brazilian Portuguese, development of cultural adaptation, and validation of the RosaQoL disease-specific questionnaire for rosacea of any subtype. METHODS: the recommended procedures for translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of an instrument were followed, and three interviews were conducted: baseline; seven to fourteen days after baseline; and at four to six months. The questionnaire was analyzed (with 95% confidence interval) for reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha); testretest reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient); responsiveness and validity. RESULTS: terms of the original questionnaire were replaced to guarantee cultural and semantic equivalence. Validity was demonstrated by expressive correlations between the RosaQoL domains and by significance in the Jonckheere-Terpstra test (p≤0.05) between the scores of the RosaQoL domains and the participants' self-perception in relation to the disease. Reliability was acceptable; alpha coefficient ranged from 0.923 to 0.916 in the first and second applications of the RosaQoL, respectively, and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.671 to 0.863 in the seven- to fourteen-day period. Responsiveness, measured by grouping participants into three categories based on self-perception of rosacea (better, worse or unchanged), was found for the "better" response group (p≤0.05). STUDY LIMITATIONS: small sample; limited variety of screening sources. CONCLUSIONS: RosaQoL-BR (Brazil) was demonstrated as a reliable, valid and responsive questionnaire, with limitations, for individuals with any subtype of rosacea. PMID: 30484528 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
  18. Admin

    Autumn and Rosacea Flare-ups

    Thanks Apurva Tathe for your tips.
  19. Apurva Tathe

    Autumn and Rosacea Flare-ups

    Why does rosacea flare in autumn? And the reason is: Autumn brings with it cool temperature and dryness in the air and what about rosacea? Yes you are right I have found that rosacea flare makes its way through autumn and gets worsen in winters. Throughout the year I do not get much flare-ups than I get with the onset of autumn and the reason is cool and dry air and the body’s temperature regulation or thermoregulation. After the humid season the climate changes and the temperature suddenly drops down with cool and dry air which draws the moisture from your skin and makes it dry and itchy causing rosacea flare-ups plus dust, mold and pollen in the air increase during fall that cause allergy and then the body sends signal to release white blood cells to the skin and trigger flare-ups. So here is what you can do to prevent rosacea flare-ups besides medications : 1. Drink lots of water to keep your body cool as you drink during summer because we tend to reduce water intake during autumn and winter and this makes our skin dry and itchy. 2. Give your skin a boost of good moisturizer that is fragrant free and chemical free on damp skin. I sometimes simply apply coconut oil to the affected area and it gives so much relief. 3. Avoid direct sun and cover your face when you go out and always apply a good sunscreen which suits your skin best with an SPF of 15 or higher and it should be mineral based not chemical based because mineral based sunscreen gives less irritation and protects your skin from both UVA and UVB rays. 4. Alcohol and hot drinks are associated with redness and flushing and our consumption increases when the weather becomes cool and that is one of the reasons of flaring. Avoid consuming alcohol and hot drinks too often and let it cool down before you drink. 5. Maintain the temperature of room heater because as you go in and out your body senses the temperature difference and so does your skin and makes it dry and flushed. 6. I have noticed that the use of normal woolen wear makes skin dry and flushed more often so I instead wear flannel clothes for body warming and it does not give frequent flares.
  20. If you have a question or concern with your rosacea please post here and get help from our community of rosaceans.
  21. Risk of psychiatric disorders in rosacea: A nationwide, population-based, cohort study in Taiwan. J Dermatol. 2018 Nov 22;: Authors: Hung CT, Chiang CP, Chung CH, Tsao CH, Chien WC, Wang WM Abstract Rosacea has been reported to be associated with psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, a nationwide study of the relationship between rosacea and comorbid psychiatric diseases in an Asian population has not been conducted. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of rosacea in the various psychiatric disorders by using a nationwide database in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2000 to 2013. In total, 7881 patients with rosacea and 31 524 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled. Patients with rosacea tended to have more coexisting psychiatric disorders. After adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity and residence/regions, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of psychiatric disorders for patients with rosacea was 2.761 (95% CI = 2.650-2.877, P < 0.001). Among them, the highest adjusted HR are phobic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder of 7.841 (95% CI = 7.526-8.170, P < 0.001) and 6.389 (95% CI = 6.132-6.657, P < 0.001), respectively. The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan does not include the information about rosacea subtypes, severity and laboratory parameters. In conclusion, rosacea is related to various psychiatric disorders. In addition to anxiety and depression, patients are also at increased risk of phobic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID: 30466187 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  22. Potassium Iodide for Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorders: A Monocentric, Retrospective Study. Dermatology. 2018 Nov 21;:1-7 Authors: Anzengruber F, Mergenthaler C, Murer C, Dummer R Abstract OBJECTIVES: Potassium iodide (KI) is a medication that has been used for decades in dermatology and it is mentioned as a treatment option in all major dermatology textbooks. Yet, there is little recent information on its efficacy. In our study, we wanted to retrospectively evaluate the therapy response to KI in our patients. METHODS: The hospital information system was searched for patients treated with KI at the Department of Dermatology (University Hospital Zurich) in the last 20 years (January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2017). A total of 52 patients were found and, subsequently, 35 patients were included in our study. RESULTS: KI was prescribed for the following skin conditions: erythema nodosum, disseminated granuloma anulare, necrobiosis lipoidica, nodular vasculitis, cutaneous sarcoidosis, and granulomatous perioral dermatitis/ rosacea. The median duration of KI intake was 5 ± 7.7 weeks (range 1-26). The global assessment of efficacy by the treating physician showed an improvement of disease in about a third of all patients. No response was seen in 14 patients and 9 even had a progression of disease. An adverse event was documented in 16 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that an improvement was reached in only about a third of all cases. High response rates with only mild side effects (in 16 out of 35 patients) were observed. PMID: 30463069 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  23. The NRS Weblog reports on October 22, 2018, "Over the course of nearly two decades since the National Rosacea Society (NRS) issued its first research grants, this program has fostered dramatic strides in the understanding of rosacea, and has now awarded more than $1.5 million to date. Funded exclusively by donations from individuals, the NRS research grants program was established in 1999 to provide support for medical research into the potential causes and other key aspects of this poorly understood disorder that may lead to improvements in its treatment, care and potential cure." [1] [bold italics added] The report then notes some of the notable studies funded with more than $1.5 million dollars, which some of these are quite good. The NRS states clearly on this blog report that all the money spent on these studies came from individual donations from members of the NRS. However, let's really look at the math on this. The RRDi has kept an accurate record of all the donations from 1998 thru 2016 and the total amount reported donations to the NRS amounts to $13,898,646. [2] The total amount reported by the NRS spent on rosacea research studies during this same period amounts to $1,403,031, which is a difference of about $96,969. You might minimize this difference but $96K to the RRDi is a big deal. If the RRDi had $96K we would spend 90% on rosacea research studies. But what is a even a bigger deal is that the NRS reports over this same period that only 10.09% of the amount donated to the NRS comes from public support (what the NRS reports in the weblog articles as 'exclusively by donations from individuals). So what does does the math now reveal? $1,402,378.38 is the actual amount reported by the NRS to the Internal Revenue Service. That is a difference of $97K, which is closer to the same amount in the previous paragraph. [2] Ok, just a $1K difference, but it helps confirm the math. So what's the big deal you ask? Go back and look at the total amount of donations reported by the NRS during this time period. Yes, almost $14 million. Look again at how much money was spent on rosacea research studies? Actually $1.4 million. So how much money of the TOTAL donations was spent on rosacea research? You do the math. Ok, I will do it for you: 10%. So for every dollar donated to the NRS ten cents is spent on rosacea research. One might ask, where did the other 90% of the donations come from when only 10% comes from public support? If you look on the NRS website home page, scroll down till you read, "Maintenance of this website in 2018 is supported by unrestricted educational grants from the following companies so that individual donations can be used to fund research" and notice the list of companies who sponsor the NRS, pharmaceutical corporations with a vested interest in rosacea. However, the NRS reports that all the rosacea research studies are "Funded exclusively by donations from individuals." So what are these educational grants funded by these pharmaceutical companies? There are none listed that are sponsored by any pharmaceutical companies shown on the NRS website. Why not ask the NRS? Better yet, why not ask the NRS for a copy of the Form 990 for 2017 that you are entitled to review yourself and see where all the money is spent. Yes, it takes time to read a Form 990 but you can get the gist of the entire report in about a twenty minute review. For example, here is a review of the 2016 Form 990. If it is really true that the public support reported amounts to $1.4 million, just think about what rosacea research could have been accomplished if more money was spent on rosacea research rather than the 10 percent the NRS spent of its total donations? Say 20 percent? Or what about 50%? How much should a non profit organization for rosacea spend on rosacea research of its total donations? If you are meditating on all this, you might ask, where did most of the 90 percent of the donations go to? What was most of the donations the NRS received over this period spent on? The answer is two private contractors, that are owned by the president of the NRS, Sam Huff. And the most surprising thing about all this is that members of the NRS don't care how the NRS spends its donations and keeps giving the NRS donations. I still haven't figured out why the members of the NRS keep donating but it is obvious they love the NRS and how it spends its donations. For more info. End Notes [1] NRS Research Grants Program Drives Key New Discoveries Posted: 10/22/2018, NRS Weblog [2] NRS Form 990 Spreadsheet 1998 thru 2016
  24. The NRS has funded a study that differentiates the difference between Subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea and Telangiectatic Photoaging (TP), a rosacea mimic which is a condition with visible blood vessels from sun damage. The NRS report on this subject states, "mast cell tryptase, an enzyme released by mast cells that is associated with inflammation, was found to be four times higher in subtype 1 rosacea skin than in TP skin, and 25 times higher than in the control group. Rosacea skin also showed significantly more evidence of matrix remodeling, a skin damage process leading to greater vasodilation." [1] It should be noted that the subtype classification of rosacea has been improved with the new phenotype classification so that Subtype 1 has been split into two distinct phenotypes, Phenotype 2 and Phenotype 3. End Notes [1] New Study Defines Rosacea and Damage From the Sun Posted: 06/15/2015, NRS Weblog
  25. Admin

    Is Coffee A Rosacea Trigger?

    A more recent study concludes: "Increased caffeine intake from coffee was inversely associated with the risk of incident rosacea. Our findings do not support limiting caffeine intake as a means to prevent rosacea. Further studies are required to explain the mechanisms of action of these associations, to replicate our findings in other populations, and to explore the relationship of caffeine with different rosacea subtypes." See end note 3 in the first post of this thread for the source.
  26. Related Articles The Spectrum and Sequelae of Acne in Black South Africans Seen in Tertiary Institutions. Skin Appendage Disord. 2018 Oct;4(4):301-303 Authors: Dlova NC, Mosam A, Tsoka-Gwegweni J Abstract Introduction: Acne is a chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous unit affecting all ethnic groups. It remains in the top 5 skin conditions seen worldwide. The paucity of data characterizing acne in South African Blacks led us to the documentation of types and sequelae of acne. Methods: This is a cross- sectional study describing the spectrum and variants of acne in 5 tertiary hospitals in the second most populous province in South Africa over 3 months (January 1 - March 31, 2015). Results: Out of 3,814 patients seen in tertiary dermatology clinics, 382 (10%) had a primary diagnosis of acne or rosacea, forming the fourth most common condition seen. Acne accounted for 361 (94.5%); acne vulgaris was the commonest subtype at 273 (75.6%), followed by steroid-induced acne 46 (12.7%), middle-age acne 6 (1.7%), acne excoriée 2 (0.6%), and "undefined" 34 (9.4%). Conclusion: The observation of steroid-induced acne as the second most common variant in Black patients underlines the need to enquire about steroid use and education about the complications of using steroid-containing skin-lightening creams. Treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation should be part of the armamentarium for holistic acne treatment in Blacks, as it remains a major concern even after active acne has resolved. PMID: 30410901 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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