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Association between Rosacea and Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Risk Factors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Biomed Res Int. 2020;2020:7015249

Authors: Li Y, Guo L, Hao D, Li X, Wang Y, Jiang X

Abstract
Background: Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin disorder. Several studies, but not all, have suggested a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in rosacea patients. This study is aimed at investigating the association between rosacea and CVDs and related risk factors.
Methods: We performed a literature search through PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases, from their respective inception to December 21, 2019. Two reviewers independently screened the articles, extracted data, and performed analysis, following the PRISMA guidelines. Odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcomes. The included studies' quality was evaluated using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS).
Results: The final meta-analysis included ten studies. The pooled analysis found no association between rosacea prevalence and the incidence of CVDs (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.86-1.10). Rosacea was found to be significantly associated with several risk factors for CVDs (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.05-1.31), including hypertension (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.02-1.35), dyslipidemia (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.00-1.79), and metabolic syndrome (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.09-2.72). However, no association was found between rosacea and diabetes mellitus (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.82-1.16). Among the biological parameters, a significant association was found between rosacea and total cholesterol (SMD = 0.40; 95% CI = -0.00, 0.81; p < 0.05), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (SMD = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.01, 0.56; p < 0.05), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.10, 0.41; p < 0.05). We found no association between rosacea and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (SMD = 0.00; 95% CI = -0.18, 0.18; p = 0.968) or triglycerides (SMD = 0.10; 95% CI = -0.04, 0.24; p = 0.171).
Conclusions: Although no significant association was found between rosacea and CVDs, rosacea was found to be associated with several of related risk factors. Patients with rosacea should pay more attention to identifiable CVD risk factors, especially those related to inflammatory and metabolic disorders.

PMID: 32685519 [PubMed - in process]

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