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Rationale for Use of Combination Therapy in Rosacea.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2020 Oct 01;19(10):929-934

Authors: Stein Gold L, Baldwin H, Harper JC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a chronic skin condition characterized by primary and secondary manifestations affecting the centrofacial skin. The primary diagnostic phenotypes for rosacea are fixed centrofacial erythema with periodic intensification, and phymatous changes. Major phenotypes, including papules and pustules, flushing, telangiectasia, and ocular manifestations, may occur concomitantly or independently with the diagnostic features. The phenotypes of rosacea patients may evolve between subtypes and may require multiple treatments concurrently to be effectively managed. We report the proceedings of a roundtable discussion among 3 dermatologists experienced in the treatment of rosacea and present examples of rosacea treatment strategies that target multiple rosacea symptoms presenting in individual patients.
METHODS: Three hypothetical cases describing patients representative of those commonly seen by practicing dermatologists were developed. A roundtable discussion was held to discuss overall and specific strategies for treating rosacea based on the cases.
RESULTS/DISCUSSION: With few exceptions, the dermatologists recommended combination therapy targeting each manifestation of rosacea for each case. These recommendations are in agreement with the current American Acne and Rosacea Society treatment guidelines for rosacea and are supported by several studies demonstrating beneficial results from combining rosacea treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: Rosacea is an evolving condition; care should take into account all clinical signs and symptoms of rosacea that are present in an individual patient, understanding that symptoms may change over time, and utilize combination therapy when applicable to target all rosacea symptoms. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(10): 929-934. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5367.

PMID: 33026776 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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