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Epidermal hydration levels in rosacea patients improve after minocycline therapy.

Br J Dermatol. 2013 Dec 6;

Authors: Ní Raghallaigh S, Powell FC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with rosacea frequently report increased skin sensitivity, with features suggestive of an abnormal stratum corneum (SC) permeability barrier. Sebum, pH and hydration levels influence epidermal homeostasis. The correlation of the change in these parameters with clinically effective treatment has not been previously analysed.
OBJECTIVE: To analyse sebum, pH, and epidermal hydration levels of patients with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) before and after treatment with systemic minocycline.
METHODS: We analysed sebum casual levels, pH and hydration along with erythema levels (as a marker of disease activity and response to treatment) on 7 designated facial sites of 35 patients with active PPR and compared the results to values on the same sites of 34 control subjects with normal facial skin. To determine the effect of minocycline on these parameters, we re-examined the patients with PPR at the same sites following a six-week course of treatment.
RESULTS: Patients with untreated PPR had significantly increased erythema indices, normal sebum casual levels, a more alkaline centrofacial region and reduced epidermal hydration levels as compared with controls. Treatment with minocycline resulted in reduced erythema and increased hydration levels, with the most marked changes evident in the cheeks (13.3% reduction in erythema indices, p = 0.0003; 12.4% increase in hydration levels, p = 0.012). There was no change in skin pH or sebum casual levels following treatment.
CONCLUSION: Patients with PPR have increased erythema indices, normal sebum casual levels, a more alkaline centrofacial region and reduced epidermal hydration levels compared with control subjects. Treatment with systemic minocycline reduces erythema and increases hydration; in the absence any change in skin pH or sebum casual levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 24354646 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24354646?dopt=Abstract = URL to article

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