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Microneedling May Not Be Good for Rosacea

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"By now, you've probably heard of microneedling — a process in which a specialized device is used to create microscopic holes in the skin — and its potential skin-smoothing, scar-reducing, and pigment-fading benefits. And while the treatment has become a highly popular request at the dermatologist's office, many are seeking ways to perform the treatment in the comfort of their own homes, too. Because of this, the Food and Drug Administration might soon be stepping in....."The at-home user may also not be aware of contraindications, such as herpes infection, an acne breakout, a psoriasis flair, a rosacea flair, an open wound, and active skin cancer, or recent chemotherapy," she says. 

The FDA May Soon Regulate At-Home Microneedling on Skin
BY ERIN NICOLE CELLETTI, allure

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But dermatologists are highly against using the tools at home because they say the needles aren’t big enough to penetrate the proper holes into skin, so you’re essentially damaging your face for no reason. And without proper sterilization, derma rollers can harbor harmful bacteria causing infections, breakouts and can trigger skin conditions such as rosacea, which causes redness and bumps on the face; eczema, itchy inflammation spots; and melasma, brown patches on the skin.

Derma Rollers are hot sellers, but the at-home microneedling tool can sometimes do more harm than good, by Jeanette Settembre, Moneyish

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