Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Admin

Prednisone

Recommended Posts

I just broke out with a poison ivy rash about five days (which I suffered with in New England, very sensitive to poison ivy) and went to the dermatologist who taking one look at the blisters on my elbows and back of my head said, "You have been eating mangoes?" I said, "How did you know?"

First off, mangoes are not in season here in Hawaii yet, so I had purchased them at Costco imported from who knows where? My derm explained that the mango tree is related to the poison oak/sumac family and the tree has a sap that is oily and gets on the skin of the mangoes. The fruit itself doesn't cause the rash but the oily sap on the skin does. I had got it on my hands and then scratched the back of my head and once the rash starts it is systemic and broke out on both elbows with little blisters that oozes and spreads the rash further. He said it will continue to break out, which I certainly know does indeed spread all over. The doc recommended a Rx for Prednisone, a nine day course which he says will clean up the blisters and rash, otherwise it will continue a month or more. I opted to take the treatment even though I am not a steroid fan. The itching with this rash is incredible and drives me batty. 

Why did I bring this up? I am on my fifth day taking Prednisone (60 mg/day X 3 days, 30 mg/day for two days) and my skin on my face has cleared up dramatically! Way better than Mirvaso or Rhofade, believe me. If you really need to get a quick clearance of rosacea, ask your physician for Prednisone. Not a recommended long term solution for rosacea, but if you have a special event such as a wedding or interview, it might be the trick to get a total clearance. Takes just a few days to get clearance.  Who knows what the rebound might be? I will surely find out, but, in the meantime, WOW!

8837AA01-6659-4039-BE55-DEB76F421929.jpeg

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brady,

Wow You look fantastic.

I am very glad you found a quick fix that works for you.

I am not a fan of corticosteroid drugs too. 

I remember that being in the hospital in the 90s for my seborrheic acne after one week of Prednisone my kidneys were blocked(I was not able to pee anymore) so they stopped giving me Prednison. So we may have different reactions to the same drug. We are all so unique.

I have read your book Rosacea 101 many times and I would like to ask you what do you think about this?

I also asked on of the MAC members a couple of a few questions after reading her most recent book 

 

Do you think there are chances to get a reply from dr. Whitney Bowe?

Thank you for your feedback.

Take care. Hugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2018 at 5:07 AM, smart2005ct said:

Hi Brady,

Wow You look fantastic.

I am very glad you found a quick fix that works for you.

I am not a fan of corticosteroid drugs too. 

I remember that being in the hospital in the 90s for my seborrheic acne after one week of Prednisone my kidneys were blocked(I was not able to pee anymore) so they stopped giving me Prednison. So we may have different reactions to the same drug. We are all so unique.

I have read your book Rosacea 101 many times and I would like to ask you what do you think about this?

I also asked on of the MAC members a couple of a few questions after reading her most recent book 

 

Do you think there are chances to get a reply from dr. Whitney Bowe?

Thank you for your feedback.

Take care. Hugs.

smart2005ct, 
I have read about concerns of soybean ingestion being unhealthy. It is established that eating raw soy is toxic. Cooked soy is edible. For human consumption, soybeans must be cooked with "wet" heat to destroy the trypsin inhibitors (serine protease inhibitors). Raw soybeans, including the immature green form, are toxic to all monogastric animals. Wikipedia source: 
Circle, Sidney Joseph; Smith, Allan H. (1972). Soybeans: Chemistry and Technology. Westport, CT: Avi Publishing. pp. 104, 163. ISBN 0-87055-111-6.

However, as you probably know, people in Asia eat tons of soy. If cooked soy is as toxic as some say, there should be evidence of this. For example, "According to the American Cancer Society, "Studies in humans have not shown harm from eating soy foods. Moderate consumption of soy foods appears safe for both breast cancer survivors and the general population, and may even lower breast cancer risk." " Wikipedia source: 
Marji McCullough, ScD, RD (8 April 2014). "The Bottom Line on Soy and Breast Cancer Risk". American Cancer Society. Retrieved 24 November 2016.

Of course, if one has an allergy to soy, i.e., similar to an allergy to peanuts, cashews, etc., then obviously one should steer clear of soy. Personally I don't eat soy (maybe occasionally I will eat something that contains soy, i.e., soy sauce) and don't seem to be bothered by it. Soy is the highest vegatable containing protein and also contains most of the essential nutrients and when you consider how many Asians eat soy and we don't read reports of any health issues or soy toxic reports, it seems odd that we continue to get reports warning us to steer clear of soy. Maybe there is something to these warnings, but as with so many issues like this, it all boils down to the individual. 

Take for example the cashew. "The shell of the cashew nut contains oil compounds which may cause contact dermatitis similar in severity to that of poison ivy, primarily resulting from the phenolic lipids, anacardic acid, and cardanol. Due to the possible dermatitis, cashews are typically not sold in the shell to consumers."  Wikipedia

So should be avoid cashews because the shell is toxic?  If you are allergic, yes. But millions of people consume cashews all over the world. The same can be said for soy. 

Maybe someday there will be some evidence that backs up all these concerns about eating soy, but for now eating a little soy in moderation doesn't seem any more unhealthy than eating a few cashews. 

I have contacted Dr. Bowe asking her to respond to your post. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Brady,

Thank you very much for your feedback and for your explanations about soy. The truth abouth soy maybe somewhere in the middle. Maybe one day we will know the whole truth.

I would like to notice another thing. Why are large quantities of Vitamins C recommended for Rosceans?

I had the chance to discuss with Dr. Madalene Heng, MD, FRACP, FACD, FAAD from Psoria-Gold with the help of her daughter Siana Cutter about high doses of vitamin C. Dr. Heng said that they may cause photosensitivity and in her book called Below the Surface: A Guide to Better Understanding Acne and Rosacea, 2014, ISBN-10: 1490469583 she said that high doses are common histamine releasers. Also doing my own research I found out that Vitamin C is the nr. 3 vasodilatator supplement (https://drgapin.com/11-supplement-vasodilators-ease-ed). The three ones - photosensitivity, histamine and vasodilatation are known as not being good Rosaceans. So why the recommandations for high doses  of Vitamin C for Rosaceans???

Thank you very much for contacting Dr. Bowe for my questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, smart2005ct said:

Dear Brady,

Thank you very much for your feedback and for your explanations about soy. The truth abouth soy maybe somewhere in the middle. Maybe one day we will know the whole truth.

I would like to notice another thing. Why are large quantities of Vitamins C recommended for Rosceans?

I had the chance to discuss with Dr. Madalene Heng, MD, FRACP, FACD, FAAD from Psoria-Gold with the help of her daughter Siana Cutter about high doses of vitamin C. Dr. Heng said that they may cause photosensitivity and in her book called Below the Surface: A Guide to Better Understanding Acne and Rosacea, 2014, ISBN-10: 1490469583 she said that high doses are common histamine releasers. Also doing my own research I found out that Vitamin C is the nr. 3 vasodilatator supplement (https://drgapin.com/11-supplement-vasodilators-ease-ed). The three ones - photosensitivity, histamine and vasodilatation are known as not being good Rosaceans. So why the recommandations for high doses  of Vitamin C for Rosaceans???

Thank you very much for contacting Dr. Bowe for my questions.

Basically Vitamin C along with other nutrients should be added for a healthy diet. We need to boost our immune system and one way is vitamin and mineral supplements. 

"Vitamin C is generally well tolerated.[1] Large doses may cause gastrointestinal discomfort, headache, trouble sleeping, and flushing of the skin.[1][3] Normal doses are safe during pregnancy.[7] The United States Institute of Medicine recommends against taking large doses." Wikipedia
[1] "Ascorbic Acid". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Archived from the original on December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
[3] WHO Model Formulary 2008 (PDF). World Health Organization. 2009. p. 496. ISBN 9789241547659. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 13, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
[7] "Ascorbic acid Use During Pregnancy | Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on December 31, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.

Linus Pauling popularized mega dosing on Vitamin C, which the Wikipedia article says, "The mega-dosing theory is to a large degree discredited." Mega dosing may cause flushing, which obviously should be avoided with rosaceans. Moderate dose of Vitamin C may prove beneficial. As with all treatment for rosacea, everyone is an individual and has to decide for themselves what is an appropriate dose. I take three 1000 mg tabs, one each, with my breakfast, lunch and dinner for a total of 3000 mg a day. Some may say this would be a high dose but I seem to tolerate this without flushing. I think the benefit of taking supplemental Vitamin C outweigh the risks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Brady,

Thank you very much for your message and arguments. I am very glad that you can take 3000 mg a day of vitamin C. If I do that I will be burnt alive(my photosensitivity will become unberable). Once again it is swown that we are unique individuals with unique reactions. I have read this aricle of "Mental Health Treatment That Works" (knowing that Rosacea may cause Anxiety and Depression) and I have noticed the same mega doses(http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v01n11.shtml) and Linus Pauling was mentioned in the article.

In this article https://rosadyn.com/rosacea/suppliments-vitamin/vitamins-supplements-rosacea-triggers/ is mentioned that if taken in mega doses vitamin C should be taken only in buffered form, Nobody is warrning Rosaceans about that.

"High Doses of Vitamin C— Vitamin C is a superb vitamin for rosacea sufferers.  It not only strengthens blood vessels throughout the skin, but it stimulates the production of new collagen and elastin which helps to strengthen thin, fragile rosacea skin.The two variables that one must be cautious of is the use of pure, unbuffered Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and the dose.  If you take more than 250 mgs at a sitting there is a good chance that this high dose of unbuffered Vitamin C can cause gastric upset — which in turn, stimulates the release of multiple dilator and inflammatory hormones from the stomach and intestine — causing facial redness and flushing.Most M.D. Naturopaths and Certified Nutritionists recommend taking only buffered forms of Vitamin C (Chelated Vitamin C or Ester C)  to prevent gastric side effects and in doing so, one can often take much larger doses  — even taking 1,000 mgs several times a day."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, smart2005ct said:

Dear Brady,

Thank you very much for your message and arguments. I am very glad that you can take 3000 mg a day of vitamin C. If I do that I will be burnt alive(my photosensitivity will become unberable). Once again it is swown that we are unique individuals with unique reactions. I have read this aricle of "Mental Health Treatment That Works" (knowing that Rosacea may cause Anxiety and Depression) and I have noticed the same mega doses(http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v01n11.shtml) and Linus Pauling was mentioned in the article.

In this article https://rosadyn.com/rosacea/suppliments-vitamin/vitamins-supplements-rosacea-triggers/ is mentioned that if taken in mega doses vitamin C should be taken only in buffered form, Nobody is warrning Rosaceans about that.

"High Doses of Vitamin C— Vitamin C is a superb vitamin for rosacea sufferers.  It not only strengthens blood vessels throughout the skin, but it stimulates the production of new collagen and elastin which helps to strengthen thin, fragile rosacea skin.The two variables that one must be cautious of is the use of pure, unbuffered Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and the dose.  If you take more than 250 mgs at a sitting there is a good chance that this high dose of unbuffered Vitamin C can cause gastric upset — which in turn, stimulates the release of multiple dilator and inflammatory hormones from the stomach and intestine — causing facial redness and flushing.Most M.D. Naturopaths and Certified Nutritionists recommend taking only buffered forms of Vitamin C (Chelated Vitamin C or Ester C)  to prevent gastric side effects and in doing so, one can often take much larger doses  — even taking 1,000 mgs several times a day."

 

Thanks for the tip and link. I like the article and will study it some more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome Brady,

I promise to come with more things I have discovered reading in the last two months(something about grape seeds extract, something about omega 3 from fish oil, something about curcumin, kefir etc)

I am very glad that you are always an open-minded person and always open to learn. We should never stop doing that.

We must learn and educate ourselves as it look like nobody is going to help us. So the more we know the less we can hurt ourselves.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×