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PubMed RSS Feed - -Topical Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Pooled Analysis of the Two Phase 3, 29-Day, Randomized, Controlled REVEAL Trials

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Topical Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Pooled Analysis of the Two Phase 3, 29-Day, Randomized, Controlled REVEAL Trials

J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Nov 01;17(11):1201-1208

Authors: Stein-Gold L, Kircik L, Draelos ZD, Werschler P, DuBois J, Lain E, Baumann L, Goldberg D, Kaufman J, Tanghetti E, Ahluwalia G, Alvandi N, Weng E, Berk D

Abstract
Background: Rosacea is a chronic dermatologic condition with limited treatment options. Methods: Data were pooled from two identically designed phase 3 trials. Patients with moderate to severe persistent erythema of rosacea were randomized to receive oxymetazoline cream 1.0% or vehicle once daily for 29 days and were followed for 28 days posttreatment. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients with ≥2-grade improvement from baseline on both Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) and Subject Self-Assessment (SSA) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose, day 29. Results: The pooled population included 885 patients (78.8% female); 85.8% and 91.2% had moderate erythema based on CEA and SSA, respectively. The primary outcome was achieved by significantly more patients in the oxymetazoline than vehicle group (P<0.001). Individual CEA and SSA scores and reduction in facial erythema (digital image analysis) favored oxymetazoline over vehicle (P<0.001). The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was low (oxymetazoline, 16.4%; vehicle, 11.8%). No clinically relevant erythema worsening (based on CEA and SSA) was observed during the 28-day posttreatment follow-up period (oxymetazoline, 1.7%; vehicle, 0.6%). Conclusion: Oxymetazoline effectively reduced moderate to severe persistent facial erythema of rosacea and was well tolerated. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(11):1201-1208.

PMID: 30500142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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