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Washing Clothes to Eliminate Demodex

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These recommendations are from ElaineA and Tom Busby at RF

20 Muleteam Borax powder is available in US grocery stores in the laundry aisle. Price locally for me is currently about $5.59 per box. Borax is used as a water softener for laundry. 
Try washing your washable clothes with some borax powder added to the wash load. Borax powder dissolves best in warm or hot water. For a cold wash, pre-disolving the borax powder in warm or hot water before adding to the wash, would be a good idea.
Instructions on the box recommend adding 1/2 cup of borax powder per wash load.

I don't know for sure that they can live for long on dry clothes, but they might - especially if there is enough oil or body lotion on the clothes or if the clothes are damp. I've read that they can live up to 54 hours on a wet towel. Wool has natural lanolin oil in it which may give them enough oil to survive when their human host is not available.

The wool scarves are trickier. If you can wash these in cold water, diluting the borax powder first in hot water, allow it to cool enough, then add to the cold wash water for the scarf might be the best approach. Then as Tom said put the scarf in the sun to dry. Interesting that the Malessezia fungus is light sensitive.

Demodex cannot be cultured in a lab (they die in an hour or two when removed from the host). They have such short lives, your clothes are not going to be a source of re-infestation of live demodex -- but as above though, the eggs should be washed off in soapy water. 

As far as I know, no one knows how the long the eggs can survive, so to be certain, you can add a tiny amount of tee tree oil to the wash-cycle of your washing machine or wash basin -- rinse the TTO off completely so it doesn't stain your clothes (especially silk or wool), and you shouldn't have to worry.

Normal "good housekeeping" for washing your clothing is sufficient in my opinion. This is a variable idea though, as winter clothing worn next to the skin, like a scarf or gloves, will probably need more washing than most people would consider "normal." About every 2-3 weeks should be enough. The hood and collar of coat (assuming the coat can't be washed) is more problematic though, and you might douse the collar and cuffs in 91% isopropyl alcohol every 2-3 weeks, and let it air dry until there's no smell. Isopropanol dries extremely quickly in a dry, winter climate. Color-test isopropanol in an inconspicuous place to be sure it doesn't lift the dye, first.

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