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PubMed RSS Feed - -Do Dermatologic Diagnosis Change in Hot vs. Cold Periods of The Year? A Sub-Analysis of the DIADERM National Sample (Spain 2016).

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Do Dermatologic Diagnosis Change in Hot vs. Cold Periods of The Year? A Sub-Analysis of the DIADERM National Sample (Spain 2016).

Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2019 Apr 11;:

Authors: Gonzalez-Cantero A, Arias-Santiago S, Buendía-Eisman A, Molina-Leyva A, Gilaberte Y, Fernández-Crehuet P, Husein-ElAhmed H, Viera-Ramírez A, Fernández-Peñas P, Taberner R, Descalzo MA, García-Doval I

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Knowledge of seasonal variation of cutaneous disorder may be useful for heath planning and disease management. To date, however, descriptions of seasonality including all diagnoses in a representative country sample are very scarce.
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if clinical dermatologic diagnosis in Spain change in the hot vs. cold periods.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Survey based on a random sample of dermatologists in Spain, stratified by area. Each participant collected data during 6 days of clinical activity in 2016 (3 in the cold period of the year, 3 in the hot period). Clinical diagnoses were coded using ICD-10.
RESULTS: With a 62% response proportion, we got data on 10999 clinical diagnoses. ICD-10 diagnostic groups that showed changes were: other benign neoplasms of skin (D23), rosacea (L71) and other follicular disorders (L73), which were more common in the hot period and acne (L70) which was more frequent in the cold period. We describe differences in the paediatric population and in private vs. public practice. Some of these differences might be associated to differences in the population demanding consultations in different periods.
CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of most clinical diagnosis made by dermatologists does not change over the year. Just a few of the clinical diagnoses made by dermatologists show a variation in hot vs. cold periods. These variations could be due to the diseases themselves or to seasonal changes in the demand for consultation.

PMID: 30982569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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