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    Charter

     

    The purpose of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is to fund research and development for finding a cure for rosacea by establishing a Medical Advisory Committee [MAC] of the best available minds on rosacea and to publish the results of this endeavor to the public and professional groups. This MAC will provide the direction of the research. Research may also include studying various treatments for the control of rosacea in multi-center, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial studies. The RRDi is commited to support patient advocacy for those suffering from rosacea. This organization is open to the public and membership is free and has been organized by rosaceans for rosaceans. This organization is a non-profit corporation registered in the State of Hawaii and 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status approval has been obtained from the IRS effective June 7, 2004. The Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, and the Conflict of Interest Policy are available for the public.

     

    Membership is open to the public and is free. Rosaceans are specially invited to join. All who join become members of the corporation and for now this number is not limited but may be revised in the future by the institute. There are two categories of members: 

    Voting Member (a member who choses voluntarily to provide contact information such as first and last name, mailing address and phone number, email addresses)

    Non Voting Member (a member who only provides one email address)

    A rosacean is anyone who is diagnosed by a physician as having rosacea. All that is necessary to be designated a voting member is a statement from the member that a diagnosis of rosacea has been obtained from a physician as well as the contact information mentioned above for voting members. Voting members should be rosacea sufferers (rosaceans). 

    Non-rosaceans are permitted to join and should identify themselves as such upon demand from the institute. Non-rosaceans are those who have not obtained a diagnosis of rosacea by a physician. 

    Any member of the institute may be removed from the membership at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Rules of the institute are published and available to the public. Violation of the rules may be grounds for termination as a member of the institute. Membership in the institute is a privilege.

    Funding will provide a rosacea MAC of the best available minds on finding a cure for this disease. The selection of who is chosen to be in this MAC will be based on not only the qualifications of the individual but also from nominations by both rosacean and non rosaceans members of the institute.

    Sources of funding to the institute will be publicized including the name of the donor unless the donor requests anonymity. Expenses of the institute will be publicized down to the last cent, showing where all the spending went and for what purpose since transparency is a core principle of our non profit organization. 

    The philosophy and spirit of this institute is that funding should predominately be used for research and development and not for the administration of the institute. Volunteers are an integral part of this spirit and we hope to include member rosaceans and non-rosaceans who are willing to help the purpose of the institute become a reality. We need your help to find a cure for rosacea, to research rosacea, to publish the findings of this research and provide a MAC of the best available minds on rosacea. The views and suggestions of rosaceans will be an integral part in directing the research on rosacea, in choosing the MAC and the directors of the institute. Voting members of the institute will have a voice in the decision making of the institute, although directors of the institute will make all final decisions.

    Members of the institute will not profit from the institute however the Medical Advisory Committee members or members may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    Members will elect a board of directors which will include:

    Director, Assistant Director, Secretary, Treasurer and other board members. The board of directors will decide all matters of the institute and will be volunteers.

    Funding on rosacea research by the RRDi will not be used on animal testing.

    Our Mission Statement may be read by clicking here.

    This charter may be revised from time to time by the institute when deemed appropriate at the sole discretion of the institute.

  • Posts

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      Introduction: Acne is a chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous unit affecting all ethnic groups. It remains in the top 5 skin conditions seen worldwide. The paucity of data characterizing acne in South African Blacks led us to the documentation of types and sequelae of acne.
      Methods: This is a cross- sectional study describing the spectrum and variants of acne in 5 tertiary hospitals in the second most populous province in South Africa over 3 months (January 1 - March 31, 2015).
      Results: Out of 3,814 patients seen in tertiary dermatology clinics, 382 (10%) had a primary diagnosis of acne or rosacea, forming the fourth most common condition seen. Acne accounted for 361 (94.5%); acne vulgaris was the commonest subtype at 273 (75.6%), followed by steroid-induced acne 46 (12.7%), middle-age acne 6 (1.7%), acne excoriée 2 (0.6%), and "undefined" 34 (9.4%).
      Conclusion: The observation of steroid-induced acne as the second most common variant in Black patients underlines the need to enquire about steroid use and education about the complications of using steroid-containing skin-lightening creams. Treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation should be part of the armamentarium for holistic acne treatment in Blacks, as it remains a major concern even after active acne has resolved.
      PMID: 30410901 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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    • Body Piercing: A National Survey in France. Dermatology. 2018 Nov 07;:1-8 Authors: Kluger N, Misery L, Seité S, Taieb C Abstract
      BACKGROUND: There are no recent data available in France regarding body piercing (BP).
      OBJECTIVE: We examined the demographics, motivations, quality of life, cutaneous conditions, and cutaneous side effects after BP within the French population.
      METHODS: A representative sample of 5,000 individuals (aged 15 and over) from the general population responded to a survey online between April and August 2017. Data regarding demographics, BP characteristics (location, age at first piercing, hesitation, regrets, motivations, cutaneous side effects), tobacco, skin conditions (acne, contact eczema, atopic eczema, rosacea, psoriasis, vitiligo), and tattoos were collected. Respondents also filled an SF-12 quality of life questionnaire.
      RESULTS: Overall, 12% of the respondents reported at least one BP (women: 19.4%, men: 8.4%, p < 0.01). The prevalence was highest among those aged between 25 and 34 years (25.8%). Individuals with BP were more likely to smoke (p < 0.01). The most common body parts for piercings were the external part of the ear (42%), the navel (24%), the tongue (15%), and the nose (11%). Gender differences included localization (belly button and nose for women, eyebrows for men) and motivations (embellishment of the body for women, individuality and sexuality for men). A total of 33.6% of the study participants reported having skin problems after BP, primarily infection (44%). Individuals with BPs were more likely to report having contact eczema, atopic dermatitis, and acne. BP was associated with a lower mental quality of life score.
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      PMID: 30404090 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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