Jump to content
  • charter.pngrrdiLogo384x64.jpg.3cd1bd79f5d066075bdd9

    The purpose of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is to fund research and development for finding a cure for rosacea by establishing a Medical Advisory Committee [MAC] of the best available minds on rosacea and to publish the results of this endeavor to the public and professional groups. This MAC will provide the direction of the research. Research may also include studying various treatments for the control of rosacea in multi-center, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial studies. The RRDi is commited to support patient advocacy for those suffering from rosacea. This organization is open to the public and membership is free and has been organized by rosaceans for rosaceans. This organization is a non-profit corporation registered in the State of Hawaii and 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status approval has been obtained from the IRS effective June 7, 2004. The Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, and the Conflict of Interest Policy are available for the public.

     

    Membership is open to the public and is free. Rosaceans are specially invited to join. All who join providing contact information become members of the corporation and for now this number is not limited but may be revised in the future by the institute. There are two categories of members: 

    Voting Member (a member who choses voluntarily to provide contact information, i.e., first and last name, mailing address and phone number, email addresses)

    Non Voting Member (a member who only provides one email address)

    A rosacean is anyone who is diagnosed by a physician as having rosacea. All that is necessary to be designated a voting member is a statement from the member that a diagnosis of rosacea has been obtained from a physician as well as the contact information mentioned above for voting members. Voting members should be rosacea sufferers (rosaceans). 

    Non-rosaceans are permitted to join and should identify themselves as such upon demand from the institute. Non-rosaceans are those who have not obtained a diagnosis of rosacea by a physician. 

    Any member of the institute may be removed from the membership at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Rules of the institute are published and available to the public. Violation of the rules may be grounds for termination as a member of the institute. Membership in the institute is a privilege.

    Funding will provide a rosacea MAC of the best available minds on finding a cure for this disease. The selection of who is chosen to be in this MAC will be based on not only the qualifications of the individual but also from nominations by both rosacean and non rosaceans members of the institute.

    Sources of funding to the institute will be publicized including the name of the donor unless the donor requests anonymity. Expenses of the institute will be publicized down to the last cent, showing where all the spending went and for what purpose since transparency is a core principle of our non profit organization. 

    The philosophy and spirit of this institute is that funding should predominately be used for research and development and not for the administration of the institute. Volunteers are an integral part of this spirit and we hope to include member rosaceans and non-rosaceans who are willing to help the purpose of the institute become a reality. We need your help to find a cure for rosacea, to research rosacea, to publish the findings of this research and provide a MAC of the best available minds on rosacea. The views and suggestions of rosaceans will be an integral part in directing the research on rosacea, in choosing the MAC and the directors of the institute. Voting members of the institute will have a voice in the decision making of the institute, although directors of the institute will make all final decisions.

    Members of the institute will not profit from the institute however the Medical Advisory Committee members or members may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    Members will elect a board of directors which will include:

    Director, Assistant Director, Secretary, Treasurer and other board members. The board of directors will decide all matters of the institute and will be volunteers.

    Funding on rosacea research by the RRDi will not be used on animal testing.

    Our Mission Statement may be read by clicking here.

    This charter may be revised from time to time by the institute when deemed appropriate at the sole discretion of the institute.

  • Posts

    • As a medical assistant for a dermatologist I worry about the added fragrance in the baby shampoo causing further irritation. 
    • I work as a medical assistant for a dermatologist. I definitely think it is a possibility for rosacea to through periods of remissions and flare-ups. This can be due to environmental factors as well as psychological factors. 
    • Related Articles Symptomatic vulvar demodicosis: A case report and review of the literature. J Cutan Pathol. 2020 Nov;47(11):1063-1066 Authors: Hedberg ML, Chibnall RJ, Compton LA Abstract Demodex folliculorum is a mite that commonly inhabits the pilosebaceous units of facial skin, particularly in a perioral and periorbital distribution. While typically an incidental and asymptomatic parasite, Demodex spp. are proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of facial folliculitis, chronic blepharitis and papulopustular rosacea. Reports of demodicosis in anatomic locations other than the face are exceedingly rare. Here we report a 36-year-old woman with symptomatic Demodex spp. infestation of Fordyce spots of the labia minora. She was referred to dermatology after a 9-month history of tender red bumps on the vulva that would arise and drain over a 24 to 72 hours period, several times per week. Physical examination revealed erythema of the labia minora and introitus with a 4 mm, pink, dome-shaped soft papule on the left labium minus. Wet mount, microbiologic cultures and sexually transmitted infection (STI) screenings were unremarkable. Histopathologic examination revealed a well-circumscribed nodule of suppurative granulomatous inflammation arising in a background of mucosa with Fordyce spots, the majority of which were infiltrated by Demodex spp. Treatment with oral ivermectin and topical metronidazole cream resulted in a symptom-free period of 22 months. This case represents an unusual presentation of symptomatic Demodex infestation. PMID: 33448447 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article More information on oral ivermectin
    • This question has come up at RF whether Finasteride or Minoxidil causes flushing or may be a rosacea trigger and you may be interested in knowing that apparently there isn't any consensus on this and these two drugs haven't been listed on any rosacea trigger list as far as we know. If you have anything to add to this or your experience using either of these treatments with your rosacea, please find the reply to topic button.  For more information 
    • Related ArticlesResolution of Refractory Corneal Neovascularization with Subconjunctival Bevacizumab. Case Rep Ophthalmol. 2020 Sep-Dec;11(3):652-657 Authors: Britton AK, Crayford BB Abstract Corneal neovascularization (CNV) has a variety of causes and threatens corneal clarity, thus optimal visual acuity. Conventional medical management includes topical steroids and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors like doxycycline. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have demonstrated promise but remain off-label for this indication. However, these agents hold value in cases refractory to first-line medical management. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with ocular rosacea and CNV affecting vision, on a background of acne rosacea. She was initially treated with fluorometholone and doxycycline, yet continued to deteriorate. Eventually she received two 1.5-mg subconjunctival injections of bevacizumab 2 months apart. CNV completely resolved and results were maintained at 4-year follow-up. This case demonstrates that refractory CNV can be effectively treated with subconjunctival injection of anti-VEGF bevacizumab. The resolution of CNV was also maintained years after injection with minimal adjunctive therapy during this period, and to our knowledge there are no other studies reporting a follow-up period of 4 years after treatment. This is a pertinent case for other clinicians treating patients in a similar situation. PMID: 33442379 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
×
×
  • Create New...