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    The purpose of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is to fund research and development for finding a cure for rosacea by establishing a Medical Advisory Committee [MAC] of the best available minds on rosacea and to publish the results of this endeavor to the public and professional groups. This MAC will provide the direction of the research. Research may also include studying various treatments for the control of rosacea in multi-center, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial studies. The RRDi is commited to support patient advocacy for those suffering from rosacea. This organization is open to the public and membership is free and has been organized by rosaceans for rosaceans. This organization is a non-profit corporation registered in the State of Hawaii and 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status approval has been obtained from the IRS effective June 7, 2004. The Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, and the Conflict of Interest Policy are available for the public.


    Membership is open to the public and is free. Rosaceans are specially invited to join. All who join become members of the corporation and for now this number is not limited but may be revised in the future by the institute. There are two categories of members: 

    Voting Member (a member who choses voluntarily to provide contact information such as first and last name, mailing address and phone number, email addresses)

    Non Voting Member (a member who only provides one email address)

    A rosacean is anyone who is diagnosed by a physician as having rosacea. All that is necessary to be designated a voting member is a statement from the member that a diagnosis of rosacea has been obtained from a physician as well as the contact information mentioned above for voting members. Voting members should be rosacea sufferers (rosaceans). 

    Non-rosaceans are permitted to join and should identify themselves as such upon demand from the institute. Non-rosaceans are those who have not obtained a diagnosis of rosacea by a physician. 

    Any member of the institute may be removed from the membership at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Rules of the institute are published and available to the public. Violation of the rules may be grounds for termination as a member of the institute. Membership in the institute is a privilege.

    Funding will provide a rosacea MAC of the best available minds on finding a cure for this disease. The selection of who is chosen to be in this MAC will be based on not only the qualifications of the individual but also from nominations by both rosacean and non rosaceans members of the institute.

    Sources of funding to the institute will be publicized including the name of the donor unless the donor requests anonymity. Expenses of the institute will be publicized down to the last cent, showing where all the spending went and for what purpose.

    The philosophy and spirit of this institute is that funding should predominately be used for research and development and not for the administration of the institute. Volunteers are an integral part of this spirit and we hope to include member rosaceans and non-rosaceans who are willing to help the purpose of the institute become a reality. We need your help to find a cure for rosacea, to research rosacea, to publish the findings of this research and provide a MAC of the best available minds on rosacea. The views and suggestions of rosaceans will be an integral part in directing the research on rosacea, in choosing the MAC and the directors of the institute. Voting members of the institute will have a voice in the decision making of the institute, although directors of the institute will make all final decisions.

    Members of the institute will not profit from the institute however the Medical Advisory Committee members or members may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    Members will elect a board of directors which will include:

    Director, Assistant Director, Secretary, Treasurer and other board members. The board of directors will decide all matters of the institute and will be volunteers.

    Funding on rosacea research by the RRDi will not be used on animal testing.

    Our Mission Statement may be read by clicking here.

    This charter may be revised from time to time by the institute when deemed appropriate at the sole discretion of the institute.

  • Posts

    • Related Articles Psychosocial aspects of rosacea with a focus on anxiety and depression. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2018;11:103-107 Authors: Heisig M, Reich A Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition characterized by facial redness and inflammatory lesions. The disease can lead to social stigmatization and may significantly reduce the quality of life of patients. Psychosocial impact of rosacea can be severe and debilitating; however, it is still underestimated.
      Objective: This paper provides a literature review focused on depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea.
      Conclusion: Rosacea patients have an increased risk of developing depression and anxiety and tend to avoid social situations. However, there are still limited data on this condition. Effective treatment of clinical symptoms brings significant improvement in psychological symptoms. Further studies should be conducted to investigate in more detail the psychological impact of rosacea. In addition, improvement of the efficacy of rosacea treatment is still needed.
      PMID: 29551906 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Genome-Wide Analysis Characterization and Evolution of SBP Genes in Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume. Front Genet. 2018;9:64 Authors: Abdullah M, Cao Y, Cheng X, Shakoor A, Su X, Gao J, Cai Y Abstract
      The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors in plants. SBP TFs are known to play important functions in a diverse development process and also related in the process of evolutionary novelties. SBP gene family has been characterized in several plant species, but little is known about molecular evolution, functional divergence and comprehensive study of SBP gene family in Rosacea. We carried out genome-wide investigations and identified 14, 32, 17, and 17 SBP genes from four Rosacea species (Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume, respectively). According to phylogenetic analysis arranged the SBP protein sequences in seven groups. Localization of SBP genes presented an uneven distribution on corresponding chromosomes of Rosacea species. Our analyses designated that the SBP genes duplication events (segmental and tandem) and divergence. In addition, due to highly conserved structure pattern of SBP genes, recommended that highly conserved region of microsyneteny in the Rosacea species. Type I and II functional divergence was detected among various amino acids in SBP proteins, while there was no positive selection according to substitutional model analysis using PMAL software. These results recommended that the purifying selection might be leading force during the evolution process and dominate conservation of SBP genes in Rosacea species according to environmental selection pressure analysis. Our results will provide basic understanding and foundation for future research insights on the evolution of the SBP genes in Rosacea.
      PMID: 29552026 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Quality of Life in Individuals with Erythematotelangiectatic and Papulopustular Rosacea: Findings From a Web-based Survey. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2018 Feb;11(2):47-52 Authors: Zeichner JA, Eichenfield LF, Feldman SR, Kasteler JS, Ferrusi IL Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of rosacea on self-perception, emotional, social, and overall well-being and quality of life in individuals with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) and papulopustular rosacea (PPR). DESIGN: We distributed a cross-sectional email invitation for participants in the United States to fill out a web-based survey. PARTICIPANTS: We included adults who reported having previously received a diagnosis of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea or papulopustular rosacea. MEASUREMENTS: Questionnaires measured the psychosocial aspects of rosacea, including the Satisfaction With Appearance Scale and modified Satisfaction With Appearance Scale questionnaires, Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Redness, Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life questionnaire, and RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. The Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Bumps or Pimples was administered to the papulopustular rosacea cohort. RESULTS: Six hundred participants enrolled and completed the survey, with most rating their rosacea as mild or moderate (ETR: 95.6%; PPR: 93.7%). In the erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts, respectively, 45 and 53 percent disagreed/strongly disagreed that they were satisfied with their appearance due to rosacea; 42 and 27 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they "worry how people will react when they see my rosacea"; and 43 and 59 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they feel their rosacea is unattractive to others. Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life total and domain scores indicated negative impact of rosacea for both cohorts. Both cohorts reported worse 36-item Short Form Health Survey overall and domain scores than population norms in the United States. CONCLUSION: Rosacea had wide-ranging, negative effects on self-perceptions and emotional, social, and overall well-being as well as rosacea-specific quality of life. Overall, both erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts reported a substantial negative impact of rosacea on quality of life on a range of instruments.
      PMID: 29552276 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • "Acne rosacea, or more commonly called just rosacea, affects 14 million people in the U.S., or five percent of the population, and is sometimes said to be an adult version of acne vulgaris." Rosacea affects 5 percent of population, Richard P. Holm, Medical Doctor, Argus Leader, Part of the USA Network, Dec 11, 2017
    • Martin Schaller, MD, from the Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen in Germany has co-wrote a paper that proposes using topical Ivermectin (Soolantra) to treat ocular rosacea. Dr. Schaller is a member of the RRDi MAC.  Br J Dermatol. 2018 Mar 12. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16534. 
      Successful therapy of ocular rosacea with topical ivermectin.
      Schaller M, Pietschke K. This was first announced by David Pascoe at RSG.