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    The purpose of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is to fund research and development for finding a cure for rosacea by establishing a Medical Advisory Committee [MAC] of the best available minds on rosacea and to publish the results of this endeavor to the public and professional groups. This MAC will provide the direction of the research. Research may also include studying various treatments for the control of rosacea in multi-center, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial studies. The RRDi is commited to support patient advocacy for those suffering from rosacea. This organization is open to the public and membership is free and has been organized by rosaceans for rosaceans. This organization is a non-profit corporation registered in the State of Hawaii and 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status approval has been obtained from the IRS effective June 7, 2004. The Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, and the Conflict of Interest Policy are available for the public.

     

    Membership is open to the public and is free. Rosaceans are specially invited to join. All who join become members of the corporation and for now this number is not limited but may be revised in the future by the institute. There are two categories of members: 

    Voting Member (a member who choses voluntarily to provide contact information such as first and last name, mailing address and phone number, email addresses)

    Non Voting Member (a member who only provides one email address)

    A rosacean is anyone who is diagnosed by a physician as having rosacea. All that is necessary to be designated a voting member is a statement from the member that a diagnosis of rosacea has been obtained from a physician as well as the contact information mentioned above for voting members. Voting members should be rosacea sufferers (rosaceans). 

    Non-rosaceans are permitted to join and should identify themselves as such upon demand from the institute. Non-rosaceans are those who have not obtained a diagnosis of rosacea by a physician. 

    Any member of the institute may be removed from the membership at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Rules of the institute are published and available to the public. Violation of the rules may be grounds for termination as a member of the institute. Membership in the institute is a privilege.

    Funding will provide a rosacea MAC of the best available minds on finding a cure for this disease. The selection of who is chosen to be in this MAC will be based on not only the qualifications of the individual but also from nominations by both rosacean and non rosaceans members of the institute.

    Sources of funding to the institute will be publicized including the name of the donor unless the donor requests anonymity. Expenses of the institute will be publicized down to the last cent, showing where all the spending went and for what purpose since transparency is a core principle of our non profit organization. 

    The philosophy and spirit of this institute is that funding should predominately be used for research and development and not for the administration of the institute. Volunteers are an integral part of this spirit and we hope to include member rosaceans and non-rosaceans who are willing to help the purpose of the institute become a reality. We need your help to find a cure for rosacea, to research rosacea, to publish the findings of this research and provide a MAC of the best available minds on rosacea. The views and suggestions of rosaceans will be an integral part in directing the research on rosacea, in choosing the MAC and the directors of the institute. Voting members of the institute will have a voice in the decision making of the institute, although directors of the institute will make all final decisions.

    Members of the institute will not profit from the institute however the Medical Advisory Committee members or members may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    Members will elect a board of directors which will include:

    Director, Assistant Director, Secretary, Treasurer and other board members. The board of directors will decide all matters of the institute and will be volunteers.

    Funding on rosacea research by the RRDi will not be used on animal testing.

    Our Mission Statement may be read by clicking here.

    This charter may be revised from time to time by the institute when deemed appropriate at the sole discretion of the institute.

  • Posts

    • Related Articles ADAMDEC1 promotes skin inflammation in rosacea via modulating the polarization of M1 macrophages. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2019 Oct 15;: Authors: Liu T, Deng Z, Xie H, Chen M, Xu S, Peng Q, Sha K, Xiao W, Zhao Z, Li J Abstract Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease which mainly affects central face, leading to cosmetic disfigurement and compromised social psychology in billions of rosacea patients. Though the exact etiology of rosacea remains elusive, accumulating evidence has highlighted the dysfunction of innate immunity and inflammation in rosacea pathogenesis. Disintegrin Metalloprotease ADAM-like Decysin-1 (ADAMDEC1) is an orphan ADAM-like metalloprotease which is believed to be closely related to inflammation. Here for the first time, we reported that Adamdec1 expression was significantly increased in the skin lesions of rosacea patients and LL37-induced rosacea-like mouse models. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of ADAMDEC1 and macrophages in patient and mouse biopsies. In cellular experiment, the expression of ADAMDEC1 was prominently elevated in M1 but not M2 macrophages. Knocking down of ADAMDEC1 significantly blunted M1 polarization in macrophages induced from human monocytes and THP-1 cell lines. Furthermore, silencing of Adamdec1 in LL-37-induced mouse model also suppressed the expression of M1 signature genes such as IL-6, iNOS and TNF-α, resulting in attenuated rosacea-like phenotype and inflammation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ADAMDEC1 plays a pro-inflammatory role in rosacea via modulating the M1 polarization of macrophages. PMID: 31627897 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles An Open-Label, Intra-Individual Study to Evaluate a Regimen of Three Cosmetic Products Combined with Medical Treatment of Rosacea: Cutaneous Tolerability and Effect on Hydration. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2019 Oct 17;: Authors: Santoro F, Lachmann N Abstract INTRODUCTION: Although rosacea management includes general skincare, previous studies have not evaluated comprehensive skincare regimens as adjuvants to other treatments. METHODS: The primary objective of this open-label, intra-individual study of subjects with rosacea was to evaluate the cutaneous tolerability of a regimen consisting of Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Day Moisturizing Cream (once daily in the morning), Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Night Repair Cream (once daily in the evening) and Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Facial Wash (foam once in the morning and once in the evening). Secondary objectives were to evaluate the effect on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and cutaneous hydration and to determine the subjects' evaluation of efficacy, tolerability and future use. A dermatologist examined subjects and measured TEWL and cutaneous hydration on day (D) 0, D7 and D21, when subjects ranked symptoms. Subjects completed a questionnaire on D21. RESULTS: The per-protocol population consisted of 42 subjects receiving treatment for rosacea. Eleven subjects developed adverse events, none of which were considered to be related to the skincare products. Five subjects showed signs or symptoms that were potentially associated with the skincare products that might suggest poor cutaneous tolerability; these were generally mild. TEWL decreased significantly by a mean of 17% on D7 and a mean of 28% on D21 compared with baseline (both P < 0.001). Skin hydration increased significantly by a mean of 5% on D7 (P = 0.008) and a mean of 10% on D21 (P < 0.001) compared with baseline. Subjects reported that the regimen was pleasant (98%) and effective (95%) and that it offered various benefits; 90% of subjects reported that they would like to continue to use the regimen and would buy the products. CONCLUSION: The skincare regimen improved skin hydration and skin barrier function in subjects receiving medical treatment for rosacea and was well tolerated. FUNDING: Galderma S.A. PMID: 31625112 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Dermoscopy in the differential diagnosis between malar rash of systemic lupus erythematosus and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: an observational study. Lupus. 2019 Oct 16;:961203319882493 Authors: Errichetti E, Lallas A, De Marchi G, Apalla Z, Zabotti A, De Vita S, Stinco G Abstract BACKGROUND: Malar rash is one of the three cutaneous diagnostic criteria of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although its clinical recognition is often straightforward, the differential diagnosis with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea may sometimes be challenging. OBJECTIVE: To describe dermoscopic features of SLE malar rash and investigate the accuracy of dermoscopy for the differential diagnosis with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. METHODS: A representative dermoscopic image of target areas was evaluated for the presence of specific features. Fisher's test was used to compare their prevalence between the two cohorts, and accuracy parameters (specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values) were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were included in the analysis, of which 13 had SLE malar rash and 15 erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. The main dermoscopic features of malar rash were reddish/salmon-coloured follicular dots surrounded by white halos ('inverse strawberry' pattern), being present in 53.9% of the cases, while network-like vessels (vascular polygons) turned out to be the main feature of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with a prevalence of 93.3%. The comparative analysis showed that the 'inverse strawberry' pattern was significantly more common in SLE malar rash, with a specificity of 86.7%, while vascular polygons were significantly more frequent in rosacea, with a specificity of 92.3%. CONCLUSION: Dermoscopy may be a useful support to distinguish SLE malar rash and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea by showing peculiar features. PMID: 31619142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1, -9, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1, and CD117 in Granulomatous Rosacea Compared with Non-granulomatous Rosacea. Acta Derm Venereol. 2019 Oct 17;: Authors: Park JB, Suh KS, Jang JY, Seong SH, Yang MH, Kang JS, Jang MS PMID: 31620803 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Coffee and Skin - Considerations Beyond the Caffeine Perspective. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Oct 14;: Authors: Bray ER, Kirsner RS, Issa NT PMID: 31622642 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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