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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide a valid email address. 

    3. Members may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Voting members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members will adhere, agree to and obey the Guidelines, Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Anyone can join as a non voting member and post in the forum without providing any contact information other than a valid email address. Guests are allowed to post in the Guest Forum. All these rules also apply to registered members and guests who are not registering an account in our Guest Forum. To remain as an active member requires posting at least once a month. After thirty days of no posting a member becomes an inactive member and has the same access to our website as a guest. 

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. 

     

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    • Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2021 Oct 18. doi: 10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Depression and anxiety are common among people with rosacea. However, the exact magnitude of the prevalence rate and odds ratios (ORs) for depression and anxiety, respectively, in rosacea patients is unclear, and no systematic review or meta-analysis of published data has yet been performed. We therefore performed as systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in rosacea patients. METHODS: We performed a systematic search of the PubMed, Embase and Medline databases for all observational studies published up to October 2020 that reported the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. The primary outcome measures were prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the I2 statistic. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup and meta-regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies involving 14,134,021 patients with rosacea were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of depression was 19.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.0-24.3%) and that of anxiety was 15.6% (95% CI 11.8-19.3%). The prevalence of depression and anxiety was significantly lower in studies using clinical criteria to diagnose depression and anxiety (9.2 and 10.2%, respectively) than in those studies using screening tools (26.2% [P < 0.01] and 22.7% [P = 0.03], respectively). The methodological quality of the included studies greatly contributed to the heterogeneity. Patients with rosacea were more likely to experience depression (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.79-2.72) and anxiety (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.56-3.44) than healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that patients with rosacea are at a higher risk of experiencing depression and anxiety. More efforts are warranted to recognize and manage depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. PMID:34657997 | DOI:10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w {url} = URL to article
    • Postepy Dermatol Alergol. 2021 Aug;38(4):590-596. doi: 10.5114/ada.2021.108917. Epub 2021 Sep 17. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Inflammation, immune system disorders, Demodex infestation, neurovascular dysregulation and oxidative stress are thought to be contributory factors in the pathogenesis of rosacea. AIM: To evaluate the presence of Demodex mites, the morphologic features of the nailfold capillaries, and the systemic oxidative stress status in patients with rosacea. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed with rosacea and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects were included in this prospective case-control study. The presence of Demodex infestation, the findings of nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), and the status of systemic oxidative stress measured by total oxidant capacity (TOC), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and oxidative stress index (OSI) were evaluated. RESULTS: Demodex infestation rates were significantly higher in rosacea patients than in controls (p = 0.001). Increases in the diameters of the capillaries and the presence of avascular areas and crossing and abnormal structures were significantly more common in rosacea patients than in the healthy controls (p < 0.01, p = 0.016, p = 0.02, p < 0.001, respectively), and hairpin structures were significantly less common in rosacea patients than in the controls (p < 0.001). The presence of crossing capillaries was positively correlated with higher TOC levels (p = 0.05), while abnormal structures were found to be correlated with lower levels of TAC (p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative status and NFC may play diagnostic and prognostic roles in rosacea, which should be confirmed by studies with larger sample sizes. PMID:34658699 | PMC:PMC8501418 | DOI:10.5114/ada.2021.108917 {url} = URL to article
    • J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2021 Oct 17. doi: 10.1111/jdv.17758. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Few studies have investigated the relationship between rosacea and upper gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, with two studies reporting conflicting data that patients with rosacea are at higher risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).1, 2 Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate a potential relationship between rosacea and GI disorders with a focus on the upper GI tract defined as the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. PMID:34661953 | DOI:10.1111/jdv.17758 {url} = URL to article
    • Cureus. 2021 Aug 31;13(8):e17617. doi: 10.7759/cureus.17617. eCollection 2021 Aug. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The multifactorial nature of rosacea and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) pathogenesis complicates the achievement of satisfactory treatment outcomes. 13C urea breath test (UBT) has been identified as an accurate, non-invasive, and quick procedure to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with high sensitivity and specificity. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aim to assess the correlation between H. pylori infection and rosacea and CSU patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted on patients with rosacea and CSU in the dermatology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. History and physical examination were performed by a dermatologist. H. pylori 13C-UBT detection was performed in all subjects. RESULTS: In total, 114 patients were included in this current study, with 41 rosacea and 73 urticaria patients. The vast majority of our subjects were females (96.5%). The mean (±SD) age was 42.3 (±12.7). More than half (58.8%) of the examined samples were positive for 13C-UBT; however, positive results were significantly higher in the rosacea patients (73.2%) compared to the urticaria group (50.7%), with a p-value of 0.019. CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the significant association of H. pylori with rosacea and CSU regardless of the presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. We thus recommend the inclusion of H. pylori testing in the routine workup of CSU and rosacea patients. PMID:34646668 | PMC:PMC8483814 | DOI:10.7759/cureus.17617 {url} = URL to article
    • Acta Derm Venereol. 2021 Oct 13. doi: 10.2340/actadv.v101.356. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Rosacea, a chronic condition usually recognized by its visible presentation, can be accompanied by invisible symptoms, such as burning and stinging. This aim of this review is to gather the most recent evidence on burning and stinging, in order to further emphasize the need to address these symptoms. Inflammatory pathways can explain both the signs and symptoms of rosacea, but available treatments are still evaluated primarily on their ability to treat visible signs. Recent evidence also highlights the adverse impact of symptoms, particularly burning and stinging, on quality of life. Despite an increasing understanding of symptoms and their impact, the management of burning and stinging as part of rosacea treatment has not been widely investigated. Clinicians often underestimate the impact of these symptoms and do not routinely include them as part of management. Available therapies for rosacea have the potential to treat beyond signs, and improve burning and stinging symptoms in parallel. Further investigation is needed to better understand these benefits and to optimize the management of rosacea. PMID:34643244 | DOI:10.2340/actadv.v101.356 {url} = URL to article More Information on Burning and Stinging in Rosacea
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