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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members (including guests) must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide an email address.

    3. Members (including guests) may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members (including guests) who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members (including guests) will adhere, agree to and obey the Guidelines, Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Guests are allowed to post for free in the Guest Forum without registering an email address and certain area of the website open to guests. All these rules apply to registered members and guests who are not registering an email (or account) and post in our Guest Forum. To remain as an active member requires a paid subscription of at least a minimum of $2/month donation. After thirty days a subscribed registered member becomes an inactive member and has the same access to our website as a guest who is not allowed in the member areas of our website. An inactive member may be an active member by simply logging into their registered account and subscribing for a minimum of $2/month donation. Subscribers may opt for a discounted ($1/month) three, six, twelve, hundred twenty month or a lifetime donation subscription plan. 

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. 

     



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  • Posts

    • Int J Dermatol. 2022 May 17. doi: 10.1111/ijd.16235. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ocular rosacea is a special manifestation of rosacea with unknown etiology. Eye involvement in rosacea patients is surprisingly common; however, it is often underdiagnosed, resulting in inappropriate treatment. We aimed to provide an updated epidemiologic perspective on ocular rosacea in Germany to improve patient care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data of 777 rosacea patients were assessed using a detailed online questionnaire regarding ocular and skin symptoms, previous dermatological and ophthalmological consults, presence of type 1 hypersensitivities, and Demodex testing. All data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Most patients reported ocular symptoms (399/777, 51.4%), including red eyes (179/399, 44.9%), itching (187/399, 46.9%), sty or chalazion (309/399, 77.4%), and dryness (108/399, 27.1%). Ocular rosacea was confirmed in 149/309 cases who consulted an ophthalmologist (45.3%). A total of 159/399 (39.8%) had no pre-existing allergies. Eye involvement was significantly associated with the presence of skin symptoms (P < 0.05), impacting patients' general well-being and overall treatment satisfaction. About half of Demodex-positive patients (21/45, 46.7%) showed ocular symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Eye involvement in rosacea patients was common, often presenting with unspecific symptoms. PMID:35579395 | DOI:10.1111/ijd.16235 {url} = URL to article
    • Just an update on the previous announcement mentioned above, consider this Version 2.  As the treasurer I have been trying to keep the RRDi non profit organization going with over a hundred videos and keeping the website going switching over to a subscription service (watch Rosacea Episodes S3:E1 and announcement) as well as sending out our latest newsletter to members (read the last newsletter dated 5/12/22). Yesterday, I went to a family reunion with my siblings and in-laws and had a short discussion with my sister-in-law who happens to be an editor for a prestigious journal in the scientific world and she explained to me that calling our ‘magazine’ a ‘journal’ is what is the issue since the title ‘journal’ implies it is a scientific journal with peer reviews and since we don’t have the funds to accomplish this since we have no rich donors, nothing to sell, and our income is derived solely from affiliate links from our store and now subscriptions to our website, we should simply use our newsletter tool we purchase through Invision Community as the medium to provide not only pro bono articles from the RRDi MAC but also from our members who may want to publish an article on rosacea. So instead of any article you wish to submit for our newsletter please follow the instructions mentioned in our previous post if you are a subscribed member of the RRDi. From henceforth, the Newsletter of the RRDi will only be available to subscribed members and we will be asking for a donation from those who do not subscribe to read the newsletter.  Then, if we can obtain the funds through donations we may be able to resume publishing the Journal of the Rosacea Research and Development Institute again properly with a peer review process.  We will mention any featured posts from RRDi members who post in the category of their choice in our member forum with a link to your post. So login to your RRDi member account and post your thoughts on rosacea. It may be considered as worthy of mentioning in a blurb mentioned in the next edition of the Newsletter of the RRDi. 
    • J Cosmet Dermatol. 2022 May 16. doi: 10.1111/jocd.15089. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES/AIMS: Rosacea is not only a skin condition but a systemic inflammatory disease that includes chronic inflammation, vascular alterations, and autoimmunity in pathogenesis. We aimed to evaluate the presence of a sensorineural hearing loss in the patients with rosacea in comparison with the healthy control group and, also to compare the audiometric results according to the severity of disease among the patient group. METHODS: Fifty-three patients with erythematelangiectatic or papulopustular type of rosacea and 105 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. Each participant had audiometric measurements after a complete ear-nose-throat examination by the same otorhinolaryngologist. RESULTS: The results of air and bone conduction thresholds showed statistically significant differences in particularly high frequencies between the groups in both the right and left ear (for all p <0.05). But there was no correlation between audiometric measurements and the severity or the type of rosacea (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of disease severity or type, rosacea patients are likely to have sensorineural hearing loss, and it is important to refer these patients in the early period. PMID:35575907 | DOI:10.1111/jocd.15089 {url} = URL to article
    • J Adv Res. 2021 Sep 1;38:261-274. doi: 10.1016/j.jare.2021.08.012. eCollection 2022 May. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Endogenous gasotransmitters are small gaseous mediators that can be generated endogenously by mammalian organisms. The dysregulation of the gasotransmitter system is associated with numerous disorders ranging from inflammatory diseases to cancers. However, the relevance of these endogenous gasotransmitters, prodrug donors and inhibitors in inflammatory dermatological disorders has not yet been thoroughly reviewed and discussed. AIM OF REVIEW: This review discusses the recent progress and will provide perspectives on endogenous gasotransmitters in the context of inflammatory dermatological disorders. KEY SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS OF REVIEW: Endogenous gasotransmitters nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are signaling molecules that regulate several physiological and pathological processes. In addition, sulfur dioxide (SO₂), methane (CH4), hydrogen gas (H2), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2) can also be generated endogenously and may take part in physiological and pathological processes. These signaling molecules regulate inflammation, vasodilation, and oxidative stress, offering therapeutic potential and attracting interest in the field of inflammatory dermatological disorders including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne, rosacea, and chronic skin ulcers. The development of effective gas donors and inhibitors is a promising alternative to treat inflammatory dermatological disorders with controllable and precise delivery in the future. PMID:35572410 | PMC:PMC9091779 | DOI:10.1016/j.jare.2021.08.012 {url} = URL to article
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