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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members (including guests) must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide an email address.

    3. Members (including guests) may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members (including guests) who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members (including guests) will adhere, agree to and obey the Guidelines, Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Guests are NOT allowed to post for free since the end of June 2022 in the Guest Forum and are required to donate with a subscription and certain areas of the website open to guests for free (95%) to view and read, however, guests are never allowed to post. All these rules apply to registered members (and guests who subscribe) or volunteer members who post in our Guest Forum or member areas of our website. To remain as an active subscribed member requires a donation with a subscription of at least a minimum of $2/month donation (or $1/month for three or more months subscription). After thirty days a subscribed registered member becomes an inactive member who has stopped donating with a subscription. An inactive member may be an active member by simply logging into their registered account and subscribing for a minimum of $2/month donation (or $1/month for three or more months subscription). Subscribers may opt for a discounted ($1/month) three, six, twelve, hundred twenty month or a lifetime donation subscription plan. Volunteers may request a waived subscription.

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Updated 10/30/2023

     

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    • This is an example of clinicians who still rely on the Subtype classification of rosacea which was abandoned several years ago. ETR is subtype 1. The new classification of rosacea into phenotypes separates this subtype into two phenotypes:  (2) Persistent Erythema (3) Telangiectasia Dapsone has been used to treat Granulomatous Rosacea [also known as Lupoid rosacea] [1] as well as PPR [2] [1] Hautarzt. 2013 Apr;64(4):226-8. doi: 10.1007/s00105-013-2556-7. Successful treatment of granulomatous rosacea with dapsone. Ehmann LM, Meller S, Homey B. Hautklinik des Universitätsklinikums Düsseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Deutschland. PubMed RSS Feed - - Dapsone  for Unresponsive Granulomatous Rosacea. [2] Dapsone Gel in the Treatment of Papulopustular Rosacea: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.        
    • Pediatr Dermatol. 2024 Feb 27. doi: 10.1111/pde.15571. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Idiopathic aseptic facial granuloma (IAFG) is an underrecognized pediatric skin disease, currently considered within the spectrum of rosacea. It usually manifests as a solitary, reddish, asymptomatic nodule on the cheek that resolves spontaneously. METHODS: Retrospective and descriptive observational study of 43 pediatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of IAFG, followed between 2004 and 2022, at two general hospitals in Argentina. RESULTS: IAFG predominated in girls (65%) and the average age of onset was about 6 years. A single asymptomatic nodule was seen in 79% of patients. The most common localization was the cheek (58%) followed by lower eyelids (41%). Family history of rosacea was present in 16% of patients. A concomitant diagnosis of rosacea and periorificial dermatitis was made in 14% and 9% of our population, respectively. Past or present history of chalazia was detected in 42% of the children. IAFG diagnosis was mainly clinical (88% of cases). Oral antibiotics were the most common indicated treatment (84%). Complete healing was achieved by the majority, but 18% of those with eyelid compromise healed with scars. CONCLUSIONS: IAFG is a benign pediatric condition that physicians should recognize in order to manage correctly. We herein refer to a particular morphologic aspect of IAFG lesions affecting the lower eyelids, where nodules adopt a linear distribution and have a higher probability of involute leaving a scar. Also, we consider that the concomitant findings of rosacea, periorificial dermatitis and chalazia in our patients, reinforce the consideration of IAFG within the spectrum of rosacea. PMID:38413004 | DOI:10.1111/pde.15571 {url} = URL to article
    • Cesk Slov Oftalmol. 2024;80(Ahead of print):1001-1008. doi: 10.31348/2024/3. ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study aims to address the issues surrounding the diagnosis of ocular rosacea and to evaluate the development of the patients' condition after treatment, as well as to distinguish between healthy and diseased patients using a glycomic analysis of tears. METHODOLOGY: A prospective study was conducted to assess a total of 68 eyes in 34 patients over a six-week period. These patients were diagnosed with ocular rosacea based on subjective symptoms and clinical examination. The study monitored the development of objective and subjective values. The difference between patients with the pathology and healthy controls was established by means of analysis of glycans in tears. RESULTS: Skin lesions were diagnosed in 94% of patients with ocular rosacea, with the most commonly observed phenotype being erythematotelangiectatic (68.8%). The mean duration of symptoms was 29.3 months (range 0.5-126 months) with a median of 12 months. Throughout the study, an improvement in all monitored parameters was observed, including Meibomian gland dysfunction, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, telangiectasia of the eyelid margin, anterior blepharitis, uneven and reddened eyelid margins, and corneal neovascularization. The study also observed improvements in subjective manifestations of the disease, such as foreign body sensation, burning, dryness, lachrymation, itching eyes, photophobia, and morning discomfort. The analysis of glycans in tears partially separated tear samples based on their origin, which allowed for the differentiation of patients with rosacea from healthy controls. In the first sample, the pathology was determined in a total of 63 eyes (98.4%) of 32 patients, with further samples showing a change in the glycomic profile of patients' tears during treatment. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated objective and subjective improvements in all the patients. Tear sampling and analysis could provide a means of timely diagnosis of ocular rosacea. PMID:38413227 | DOI:10.31348/2024/3 {url} = URL to article
    • This test seems to have cornered the diagnosis of different skin diseases. Gate Recurrent Unit "introduced in 2014 by Kyunghyun Cho et al." Wikipedia Maybe we will hear more about this in diagnosing rosacea?
    • This is a new variant of demodicidosis (demodectic rosacea). The variants keep growing. 
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