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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide a valid email address. 

    3. Members may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Voting members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members will adhere, agree to and obey the Guidelines, Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Anyone can join as a non voting member and post in the forum without providing any contact information other than a valid email address. 

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. 

     

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    • Related Articles An Open-Label, Intra-Individual Study to Evaluate a Regimen of Three Cosmetic Products Combined with Medical Treatment of Rosacea: Cutaneous Tolerability and Effect on Hydration. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2019 Oct 17;: Authors: Santoro F, Lachmann N Abstract INTRODUCTION: Although rosacea management includes general skincare, previous studies have not evaluated comprehensive skincare regimens as adjuvants to other treatments. METHODS: The primary objective of this open-label, intra-individual study of subjects with rosacea was to evaluate the cutaneous tolerability of a regimen consisting of Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Day Moisturizing Cream (once daily in the morning), Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Night Repair Cream (once daily in the evening) and Cetaphil PRO Redness Control Facial Wash (foam once in the morning and once in the evening). Secondary objectives were to evaluate the effect on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and cutaneous hydration and to determine the subjects' evaluation of efficacy, tolerability and future use. A dermatologist examined subjects and measured TEWL and cutaneous hydration on day (D) 0, D7 and D21, when subjects ranked symptoms. Subjects completed a questionnaire on D21. RESULTS: The per-protocol population consisted of 42 subjects receiving treatment for rosacea. Eleven subjects developed adverse events, none of which were considered to be related to the skincare products. Five subjects showed signs or symptoms that were potentially associated with the skincare products that might suggest poor cutaneous tolerability; these were generally mild. TEWL decreased significantly by a mean of 17% on D7 and a mean of 28% on D21 compared with baseline (both P < 0.001). Skin hydration increased significantly by a mean of 5% on D7 (P = 0.008) and a mean of 10% on D21 (P < 0.001) compared with baseline. Subjects reported that the regimen was pleasant (98%) and effective (95%) and that it offered various benefits; 90% of subjects reported that they would like to continue to use the regimen and would buy the products. CONCLUSION: The skincare regimen improved skin hydration and skin barrier function in subjects receiving medical treatment for rosacea and was well tolerated. FUNDING: Galderma S.A. PMID: 31625112 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Dermoscopy in the differential diagnosis between malar rash of systemic lupus erythematosus and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: an observational study. Lupus. 2019 Oct 16;:961203319882493 Authors: Errichetti E, Lallas A, De Marchi G, Apalla Z, Zabotti A, De Vita S, Stinco G Abstract BACKGROUND: Malar rash is one of the three cutaneous diagnostic criteria of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although its clinical recognition is often straightforward, the differential diagnosis with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea may sometimes be challenging. OBJECTIVE: To describe dermoscopic features of SLE malar rash and investigate the accuracy of dermoscopy for the differential diagnosis with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. METHODS: A representative dermoscopic image of target areas was evaluated for the presence of specific features. Fisher's test was used to compare their prevalence between the two cohorts, and accuracy parameters (specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values) were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were included in the analysis, of which 13 had SLE malar rash and 15 erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. The main dermoscopic features of malar rash were reddish/salmon-coloured follicular dots surrounded by white halos ('inverse strawberry' pattern), being present in 53.9% of the cases, while network-like vessels (vascular polygons) turned out to be the main feature of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with a prevalence of 93.3%. The comparative analysis showed that the 'inverse strawberry' pattern was significantly more common in SLE malar rash, with a specificity of 86.7%, while vascular polygons were significantly more frequent in rosacea, with a specificity of 92.3%. CONCLUSION: Dermoscopy may be a useful support to distinguish SLE malar rash and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea by showing peculiar features. PMID: 31619142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1, -9, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1, and CD117 in Granulomatous Rosacea Compared with Non-granulomatous Rosacea. Acta Derm Venereol. 2019 Oct 17;: Authors: Park JB, Suh KS, Jang JY, Seong SH, Yang MH, Kang JS, Jang MS PMID: 31620803 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Coffee and Skin - Considerations Beyond the Caffeine Perspective. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Oct 14;: Authors: Bray ER, Kirsner RS, Issa NT PMID: 31622642 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Clinical diagnosis through paintworks observation Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc. 2019 Jul 31;57(2):113-117 Authors: Zamudio-Martínez G, Zamudio-Martínez A Abstract Despite of the important technological advances which today allow a precise diagnosis through genetic or imaging studies, one of the fundamental pillars of medical diagnosis is, and always will be, patient examination. The visual identification of the signs that distinguish a disease is still important to make a clinical diagnosis. These very same examination skills and the knowledge on the disorders’ appearance, as well as the technical abilities of the artists that once painted pictures, allow us to diagnose a rosacea among Rembrandt’s self-portraits, or Marfan’s syndrome amidst Egon Schiele’s elongated figures. It is possible to find diseases represented in paintworks from long before someone ever described them in a book, longer even before someone considered them illnesses. PMID: 31618566 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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