• Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. Corporate members must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required.

    3. Members may not profit from the institute; however, the Medical Advisory Consultants ( or Committee) members or any other members may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which members are not rosacea sufferers.

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members will adhere, agree to and obey the Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute.
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    • "According to the researchers, while both the 532 and 940nm wavelength lasers are effective for facial telangiectasias, they lacked evidence to support whether one wavelength was superior to the other until now.....Given the efficacy and safety of the 940nm wavelength laser, the researchers recommend this wavelength be added to the standard treatment facial vasculature." Better Laser For Treating Facial Spider Veins Identified By BUSM Researchers, Medical News Today
    • Related Articles Alcohol intake and risk of rosacea in US women. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Apr 01;: Authors: Li S, Cho E, Drucker AM, Qureshi AA, Li WQ Abstract
      BACKGROUND: The epidemiologic association between alcohol and rosacea is unclear and inconsistent based on the previous cross-sectional or case-control studies.
      OBJECTIVE: We conducted a cohort study to determine the association between alcohol intake and the risk of rosacea in women.
      METHODS: A total of 82,737 women were included from the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on alcohol intake was collected every 4 years during follow-up. Information on history of clinician-diagnosed rosacea and year of diagnosis was collected in 2005.
      RESULTS: Over 14 years of follow-up, we identified 4945 cases of rosacea. Compared with never drinkers, increased alcohol intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of rosacea (Ptrend <.0001). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were 1.12 (95% CI 1.05-1.20) for alcohol intake of 1-4 g/day and 1.53 (1.26-1.84) for ≥30 g/day. The associations remained consistent across categories of smoking status. Further examination of types of alcoholic beverage consumed revealed that white wine (Ptrend <.0001) and liquor intake (Ptrend = .0006) were significantly associated with a higher risk of rosacea.
      LIMITATIONS: This was an epidemiologic study without examination into etiologic mechanisms.
      CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of rosacea in women.
      PMID: 28434611 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Disseminated extrafacial rosacea with papulonecrotic lesions. J Dermatol Case Rep. 2016 Dec 31;10(4):68-72 Authors: Demitsu T, Tsukahara R, Umemoto N, Nakamura S, Nagashima K, Yamada T, Kakurai M, Tanaka Y, Kakehashi A, Miyata T Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common skin disease and predominantly affects on the face of middle-aged women. It exceptionally occurs on the extrafacial areas such as ear, neck, axilla, and upper extremities, and has been reported as disseminated rosacea.
      MAIN OBSERVATION: A 40-year-old Japanese female presented with one-month history of erythematous skin eruption with burning sensation on the face, neck, and upper limbs. Physical examination showed rosacea-like eruption on the face as well as multiple papules disseminated on the neck, forearms, and hands. These extrafacial lesions demonstrated papulonecrotic appearance. Bilateral conjunctiva showed marked hyperemic which was consistent with ocular rosacea. Corneal opacity was also seen. Histology of the umbilicated papule on the neck revealed necrobiotic granulomas around the hair follicle with transepidermal elimination. Another tiny solid papule on the forearm suggesting early lesion also demonstrated necrobiosis with palisading granuloma but no transepidermal elimination. Systemic administration of minocycline and topical tacrolimus therapy promptly improved the skin lesions. Topical application of fluorometholone in temporary addition with levofloxacin improved ocular involvement 12 weeks after her 1st visit. The clinical course of the skin lesion and ocular symptoms mostly correlated. Then, the skin lesion and ocular symptoms often relapsed. Rosacea uncommonly associates with the extrafacial involvement as disseminated rosacea. The present case is characterized by the disseminated papulonecrotic lesions of the extrafacial areas histologically showing transepidermal elimination of necrobiotic granulomas.
      CONCLUSIONS: Dermatologists should recognize that papulonecrotic lesions of the neck and upper extremities might be extrafacial rosacea when the patient has rosacea on the face.
      PMID: 28435478 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • "I have one other suggestion. One of my patients finds that when she follows a strict sugar-free diet, her facial redness fades almost completely. But if she has so much as a chocolate biscuit, the redness flares up again the next day. There’s no evidence to back this up, but I’ve seen that it works for her. Why not try it?" How CAN I banish my embarrassing rosacea? DR MARTIN SCURR answers questions from readers, Martin Scurr, Daily Mail 
       
    • "Dermatologist Mara Weinstein says, "Rose hip oil is packed full of vitamins (vitamin A, vitamin C) and antioxidants. It has anti-inflammatory properties, which can help reduce the redness associated with rosacea and acne-prone skin, which is sensitive skin. Just make sure that whatever formulation you pick up is noncomedogenic (doesn't clog pores)." Red in the face: What to do about rosacea, Ellen Warren, Chicago Tribune