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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide a valid email address. 

    3. Members may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Voting members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members will adhere, agree to and obey the Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Anyone can join as a non voting member and post in the forum without providing any contact information other than a valid email address. 

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. 

     

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  • Posts

    • Surgical Treatment Strategy for Severe Rhinophyma With Bilateral Pedicled Nasolabial Flaps. J Craniofac Surg. 2019 Apr 12;: Authors: Cui MY, Guo S, Wang CC, Lv MZ, Jin SF Abstract BACKGROUND: Rhinophyma is a rare disease characterized by chronic inflammation and hypertrophy of sebaceous glands, blood vessels, and fibrous tissue, associated with end-stage severe acne rosacea. There are multiple approaches to treatment and repair, including dermal shaving, secondary intention healing, free skin graft, and skin flaps. However, these methods have various disadvantages, such as prolonged healing, obvious scarring, and skin texture mismatch. Therefore, the authors adopted surgical excision with bilateral pedicled nasolabial flaps, which have better color, texture, thickness, and symmetry. METHODS: The authors present a case of severe nasal tip rhinophyma successfully treated by excision and repair with bilateral pedicled nasolabial flaps. This procedure combines deep excision of the focal lesion and coverage with bilateral nasolabial flaps. RESULTS: The bilateral pedicled nasolabial flaps were used for severe rhinophyma in a patient. After the operation, the flaps survived uneventfully in this study. Both functional and aesthetic results were satisfactory at 3 months. CONCLUSION: The authors offer an effective method for surgical treatment of rhinophyma. Excision of hypertrophic nasal tissue is an acknowledged effective treatment for patients with severe rhinophyma. After excision, reconstruction with nasolabial flaps results in satisfactory outcomes both functionally and aesthetically. Therefore, this approach should be considered an appropriate alternative in cases of severe rhinophyma. PMID: 30998589 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • A detailed report on cannabinoid signaling in the skin had this to say:  "It has recently been shown that abuse of synthetic, hyperpotent cannabinoids (e.g., “Bonsai”, “fake weed”, “K2”, and “Jamaica”) can result in dermatological disorders, such as premature skin aging, hair loss and graying, or acne [88], indicating that cannabinoid signaling can profoundly influence skin biology." "Importantly, with respect to the efficiency of PEA, human clinical data are also available. Indeed, the PEA containing Physiogel® A.I. Cream was found to alleviate itch in 14 out of 22 patients suffering from prurigo, lichen simplex and other pruritic diseases. Importantly, the same formulation was found to be effective in alleviating erythema, excoriation, scaling, lichenification, dryness, as well as pruritus in AD patients (ATOPA study). However, another vehicle controlled, randomized clinical trial involving a total of 100 subjects suffering from pruritic dry skin (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00663364) found that a PEA containing lotion was not significantly superior in alleviating itch as compared to its emollient vehicle." PEA is Palmitamide MEA, a naturally occurring lipid compound that may act as an anti-oxidant and anti-irritant. Molecules. 2019 Mar; 24(5): 918. Published online 2019 Mar 6. doi: 10.3390/molecules24050918 Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the “C(ut)annabinoid” System Kinga Fanni Tóth, Dorottya Ádám, Tamás Bíró, Attila Oláh
    • Related Articles [The value of reflectance confocal microscopy in detection of Demodex mites]. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Jun - Jul;144(6-7):459-461 Authors: Harmelin Y, Le Duff F, Passeron T, Lacour JP, Bahadoran P PMID: 28347561 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • A sample of food-grade diatomaceous Earth  Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Diatomaceous earth - also known as D.E., diatomite, or kieselgur/kieselguhr – is a naturally occurring, soft, siliceous sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. Wikipedia Can it be used to treat demodectic rosacea?  At least one person thinks so.  This was posted initially at Facebook, Rosacea Tips and Support Group, by Karli Walton who writes, "People are using horsepaste (ivermectin) for their mites, ivermectin is also in sooIantra. I haven’t tried either. You can also use diatomaceous earth powder mixed with honey. I use the powder on my dogs for their mites and fleas. It’s natural and won’t hurt you. Just keep in mind with any of these things, that it will get better before it gets worse. When you put it on, the mites start freaking out before they die." Karli probably meant it 'gets worse before it gets better.' Without a doubt, since it was posted on Facebook, others will try this and we receive more reports  since you can obtain food grade diatomaceous earth below and other mediums besides honey will be attempted and the results will be coming in. 
    • Related Articles Do Dermatologic Diagnosis Change in Hot vs. Cold Periods of The Year? A Sub-Analysis of the DIADERM National Sample (Spain 2016). Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2019 Apr 11;: Authors: Gonzalez-Cantero A, Arias-Santiago S, Buendía-Eisman A, Molina-Leyva A, Gilaberte Y, Fernández-Crehuet P, Husein-ElAhmed H, Viera-Ramírez A, Fernández-Peñas P, Taberner R, Descalzo MA, García-Doval I Abstract BACKGROUND: Knowledge of seasonal variation of cutaneous disorder may be useful for heath planning and disease management. To date, however, descriptions of seasonality including all diagnoses in a representative country sample are very scarce. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if clinical dermatologic diagnosis in Spain change in the hot vs. cold periods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Survey based on a random sample of dermatologists in Spain, stratified by area. Each participant collected data during 6 days of clinical activity in 2016 (3 in the cold period of the year, 3 in the hot period). Clinical diagnoses were coded using ICD-10. RESULTS: With a 62% response proportion, we got data on 10999 clinical diagnoses. ICD-10 diagnostic groups that showed changes were: other benign neoplasms of skin (D23), rosacea (L71) and other follicular disorders (L73), which were more common in the hot period and acne (L70) which was more frequent in the cold period. We describe differences in the paediatric population and in private vs. public practice. Some of these differences might be associated to differences in the population demanding consultations in different periods. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of most clinical diagnosis made by dermatologists does not change over the year. Just a few of the clinical diagnoses made by dermatologists show a variation in hot vs. cold periods. These variations could be due to the diseases themselves or to seasonal changes in the demand for consultation. PMID: 30982569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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