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  • Corporate Membership is open to the public and rosaceans are welcome

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    1. RRDi members (including guests) must be polite and respectful to fellow members taking into consideration the individual fellow member's religious, ethical, and cultural values, as well as age, race and sex. The institute determines what is polite and respectful and may or may not give warnings for violating this rule. Removal from the membership is possible for violating this rule. It is a privilege to be a member of the RRDi and not a right.

    2. To be a legal corporate voting member a name, mailing address, two email addresses, and a statement of whether the member is a rosacean or not a rosacean is required. Non voting members are only required to provide an email address.

    3. Members (including guests) may not profit from the institute; however, any Medical Advisory Consultants (or Committee) member or any other member may be compensated for services rendered to the institute.

    4. Members (including guests) who sell items or services for rosacea may comment on a treatment, product, book or service sold by the member when another member asks for information. However, the institute may at any time stop the discussion, delete the posts or ban the member at the sole discretion of the institute. Warnings may or may not be given to the member by the institute. Profiting from contacts of fellow members through the institute is not the purpose of this non profit institute. However, information is acceptable to post when asked and appropriate comments are allowed subject to the approval by the institute. The RRDi determines if the post is appropriate or not and you agree to this decision.

    5. Members should state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and failure to discuss this may be grounds for dismissal as a member. The institute needs to know which voting members are rosaceans to determine the percentage of voting members who have a diagnosis of rosacea from a physician and which voting members are not rosacea sufferers. Non voting members are also required to state if they have a diagnosis of rosacea if another member inquires.  

    6. Privacy is of concern to the institute. Names, mailing and email addresses are not given out to the public or to fellow members by the institute. Your public profile is available to anyone to view but only shows your location, country, and whether you are a rosacean if you put data into these public profile boxes. Your personal profile like first and last name, etc., is never shown to the public and only RRDi staff members can view your personal profile. You agree to allow your public profile to be shown. Members should not release names, mailing or email addresses of fellow members if you are aware of the personal contact information of a fellow member without the consent of the fellow member. A Privacy Policy is available for the public. Members who donate to the institute will be listed with their name and the amount unless the donor requests anonymity. If you want to remain anonymous please let the institute know when you donate otherwise your name will be posted without any address, phone, or email address.

    7. Members (including guests) will adhere, agree to and obey the Guidelines, Charter, Articles of Incorporation, the Bylaws, the Conflict of Interest Policy and these Rules of the Institute. Violation of any of these rules may be grounds for being removed as a corporate voting member or non voting member. You may view these documents by request or check the site index.

    8. A 'rosacean' is a rosacea sufferer. 'Institute' refers to the RRDi. RRDi refers to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. You accept these terms.

    9. Guests are NOT allowed to post for free since the end of June 2022 in the Guest Forum and are required to donate with a subscription and certain areas of the website open to guests for free (95%) to view and read, however, guests are never allowed to post. All these rules apply to registered members (and guests who subscribe) or volunteer members who post in our Guest Forum or member areas of our website. To remain as an active subscribed member requires a donation with a subscription of at least a minimum of $2/month donation (or $1/month for three or more months subscription). After thirty days a subscribed registered member becomes an inactive member who has stopped donating with a subscription. An inactive member may be an active member by simply logging into their registered account and subscribing for a minimum of $2/month donation (or $1/month for three or more months subscription). Subscribers may opt for a discounted ($1/month) three, six, twelve, hundred twenty month or a lifetime donation subscription plan. Volunteers may request a waived subscription.

       10.  The Rules of the Institute may be changed at any time at the sole discretion of the institute. Updated 10/30/2023

     

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  • Posts

    • If we had 100 core members who subscribe a dollar a month we could see the RRDi website and non profit organization going. Would you be one the core 100 members who subscribe a dollar a month? 
    • Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2024 Jun 6;151(3):103244. doi: 10.1016/j.annder.2023.103244. Online ahead of print. NO ABSTRACT PMID:38848643 | DOI:10.1016/j.annder.2023.103244 {url} = URL to article
    • Indian J Dermatol. 2024 Mar-Apr;69(2):152-158. doi: 10.4103/ijd.ijd_815_22. Epub 2024 Apr 29. ABSTRACT Gluten, a polypeptide hapten, found in many cereals such as barley, wheat, rye, oats, and others, has been recently implicated in a range of cutaneous disorders ranging from chronic plaque psoriasis through psoriatic arthritis, urticaria (chronic as well as paediatric onset), and angioedema to lichen planus, vitiligo, and rosacea. The evidence for them is still not well reviewed. To generate evidence for the causal role of gluten in various dermatological disorders. The Pubmed, MedLine, and EMBASE databases were searched using the keywords "Gluten" and one of the dermatoses, namely, "Atopic Dermatitis", "Vasculitis", "Psoriasis", "Psoriatic Arthritis", "Acne", "Alopecia Areata", and "Immunobullous disorders". All articles published in English for which free full text was available were taken into consideration. The search strategy returned in a total of 1487 articles which were screened for relevance and elimination of duplicates. Ultimately, around 114 articles were deemed suitable. The data were extracted and presented in the narrative review format. A simple and cost-effective solution to many of these chronic and lifelong conditions is to restrict gluten in the diet. However, the dermatologist would do well to remember that in the vast majority of dermatological disorders including the ones listed here, gluten restriction is not warranted and can even lead to nutritional deficiencies. The evidence varied from Grade I for some disorders like psoriatic arthritis to Grade IV to most disorders like acne, vitiligo, vasculitis, and atopic dermatitis. Herein, we review the evidence for each of these conditions and make practical recommendations for gluten restriction in them. PMID:38841247 | PMC:PMC11149804 | DOI:10.4103/ijd.ijd_815_22 {url} = URL to article
    • Skin Appendage Disord. 2024 Jun;10(3):207-214. doi: 10.1159/000536246. Epub 2024 Feb 2. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory dermatosis characterized by erythema, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules on the central face. The frequency of contact sensitization complicating rosacea and its therapy is unknown, with only few studies published in the literature. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate contact sensitivity in patients with rosacea. METHODS: A total of 50 rosacea patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Both groups were patch tested with the European Baseline Series. RESULTS: A positive reaction to at least one allergen of the European Baseline Series was observed in 15 (30%) of rosacea patients and 10 (20%) of the healthy controls. Although the rate of positive reaction in the rosacea group was higher than in the controls, no statistically significant difference was documented. In addition, the total number of positive reactions to allergens in the rosacea group was higher than the control group, namely, 26 versus 17. CONCLUSION: Contact hypersensitivity may coexist with rosacea. Its identification holds significant clinical relevance, influencing the long-term management and justifying the application of patch testing in rosacea patients. PMID:38835717 | PMC:PMC11147521 | DOI:10.1159/000536246 {url} = URL to article
    • J Cosmet Dermatol. 2024 Jun 3. doi: 10.1111/jocd.16372. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND & AIM: Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory, multifactorial disease for which combination therapy could be an effective treatment. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the combination therapy of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% as a single cream for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea. METHOD: A stable and appropriate formulation was prepared by adding the aqueous phase to the lipid phase while being stirred. The stability and physicochemical properties of the formulation were evaluated under accelerated conditions. Twelve patients (36-60 years) with mild to moderate papulopustular rosacea and a Demodex count of five or more were treated with the combination of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% cream. Clinician's Erythema Assessment (CEA), Patients Self-Assessment (PSA), skin erythema (ΔE) and lightness (ΔL), and skin biophysical parameters including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, pH, and sebum content, as well as erythema and melanin index and ultrasound parameters, were measured before treatment and 4 and 8 weeks after. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded. RESULTS: CEA and PSA decreased significantly from 3 to 2 after 8 weeks, respectively (p-value = 0.014 for CEA and 0.010 for PSA). ΔE and ΔL, as well as skin erythema index and TEWL improved after 8 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05). Two patients withdrew from the study in the first week because of local adverse effects; one developed flushing following treatment and left the investigation after 4 weeks and another patient withdrew from the study after 4 weeks due to deciding to become pregnant. CONCLUSION: Eight-week treatment with the combination of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% was shown to be effective for improvement of erythema and inflammatory lesions in mild to moderate papulopustular rosacea. PMID:38831548 | DOI:10.1111/jocd.16372 {url} = URL to article
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