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  • Message from the Founder - Volunteers and Transparency

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    In January 2005 the Board of Directors chose me as the director of the RRDi, and Warren Stuart as the Assistant Director. In 2010 we were again voted to serve another five years on the board. Warren was instrumental in forming and establishing the RRDi, helping out with our web site and setting up our member forum. Warren also established a sister site relationship with his Rosacea Forum. Sadly, Warren passed away in 2012 (for more info click here). In 2015 I was again voted to serve another five years on the board as director. 

    You might be interested in a more detailed history of the RRDi

    An article was written on why I formed the RRDi. You should carefully investigate the other non profit organizations for rosacea and compare how they are run with the RRDi. The big difference is that this non profit is run with a volunteer spirit by rosacea sufferers. 

    Volunteers
    What other non profit organization for rosacea is run by volunteers? This is the driving force behind this non profit organization for rosacea founded by rosacea sufferers. 

    The one thing you can be sure of is that any donations will NOT be spent on private contractors or salaries at this point since everyone associated with the RRDi are volunteers. This can be done because of the volunteer spirit with which this institute was set up. Can you help? When you join, in the comment box let us know you want to volunteer. If you simply join that would increase our numbers. Any small donation helps us keep going. However, volunteering is what makes this non profit different from the other rosacea non profits (read this post). 

    A database of research suggestions is being accumulated which you may access or make suggestions by clicking here.

    The RRDi is the only non profit that allows rosaceans any say in determining who is on the board of directors. The other non profits are closed board of directors and if you aren't happy with the direction there is nothing you can do about it. Whatever the direction the RRDi takes, whether to research the cause, or the cure, or whatever is done you can at least know that rosaceans had a say into what research the RRDi will engage in. The board of directors have the final say on this.

    Transparency
    We believe in transparency. How the RRDi is run is public knowledge. You can clearly review all our financial records. All the other non profits keep their articles of incorporation a deep secret. Their financial records are cryptically revealed in only an IRS Form 990 report that is confusing and difficult to read. That is a big difference. You have a say if you join and become a corporate member. You can vote who is on the board of directors. Can you do that with any other rosacea non profit organization? I have always felt that rosaceans should have a say in what is being done and not leave that up totally to those who may have their own agenda or leave the decision to private contractors. The MAC at the RRDi is just that; a medical ADVISORY committee. The board of directors who are rosaceans make the final decision on the research and all matters. And if you desire, you as a rosacean, if you join the RRDi as a corporate member, can determine who serves on the board of directors.

    Non Profit Organization

    501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status has been approved by the IRS effective June 7, 2004. With such a legacy, you can see the RRDi is a solid non profit organization for rosaceans you can trust. Please join

    Brady Barrows
    RRDi Founder

     

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  • Posts

    • Comparative effectiveness of purpuragenic 595 nm pulsed dye laser versus sequential emission of 595 nm pulsed dye laser and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser: a double-blind randomized controlled study. Acta Dermatovenerol Alp Pannonica Adriat. 2019 Mar;28(1):1-5 Authors: Campos MA, Sousa AC, Varela P, Baptista A, Menezes N Abstract INTRODUCTION: Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea is a common condition in Caucasians. The most frequently used lasers to treat this condition are pulsed dye laser (PDL) and neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (Nd:YAG). This study compares the treatment efficacy of purpuragenic PDL with that of sequential emission of 595 nm PDL and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG (multiplexed PDL/Nd:YAG). METHODS: We performed a prospective, randomized, and controlled split-face study. Both cheeks were treated, with side randomization to receive treatment with PDL or multiplexed PDL/Nd:YAG. Efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement, visual photograph evaluation, the Dermatology Quality of Life Index questionnaire, and a post-treatment questionnaire. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Treatment was associated with a statistically significant improvement in quality of life (p < 0.001). PDL and multiplexed PDL/Nd:YAG modalities significantly reduced the erythema index (EI; p < 0.05). When comparing the degree of EI reduction, no differences were observed between the two treatment modalities. PDL was associated with a higher degree of pain and a higher percentage of purpura. Multiplexed PDL/Nd:YAG modality was associated with fewer side effects and greater global satisfaction, and 96.3% of the patients would recommend this treatment to a friend. CONCLUSIONS: Both laser modalities are efficacious in the treatment of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. The multiplexed PDL/Nd:YAG modality was preferred by the patients. PMID: 30901061 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Logo of the Human Microbiome Project, a program of the NIH Common Fund, National Institutes of Health, image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons This subject of microbiome-based therapeutic strategies for rosacea is one of my favorite subjects which I have done a great deal of research on. You may want to read the latest article I have written on this subject of the human microbiome. 
    • Related Articles Skin diseases are more common than we think: screening results of an unreferred population at the Munich Oktoberfest. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2019 Mar 19;: Authors: Tizek L, Schielein MC, Seifert F, Biedermann T, Böhner A, Zink A Abstract BACKGROUND: Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, resulting in an enormous non-fatal burden. Despite this, many affected people do not consult a physician. Accordingly, the actual skin disease burden might be even higher since reported prevalence rates are typically based on secondary data that exclude individuals who do not seek medical care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of skin diseases in an unreferred population in a real-life setting. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 9 days duration was performed in 2016 at the 'Bavarian Central Agricultural Festival', which is part of the Munich Oktoberfest. As part of a public health check-up, screening examinations were performed randomly on participating visitors. All participants were 18 years or older and provided written informed consent. RESULTS: A total of 2701 individuals (53.5% women, 46.2% men; mean age 51.9 ± 15.3 years) participated in the study. At least one skin abnormality was observed in 1662 of the participants (64.5%). The most common diagnoses were actinic keratosis (26.6%), rosacea (25.5%) and eczema (11.7%). Skin diseases increased with age and were more frequent in men (72.3%) than in women (58.0%). Clinical examinations showed that nearly two-thirds of the affected participants were unaware of their abnormal skin findings. CONCLUSION: Skin diseases might be more common than previously estimated based on the secondary data of some sub-populations. Further information and awareness campaigns are needed to improve people's knowledge and reduce the global burden associated with skin diseases. PMID: 30891839 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Fractionated Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing as an Ideal Treatment Option for Severe Rhinophyma: A Case Report and Discussion. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2019 Jan;12(1):24-27 Authors: Comeau V, Goodman M, Kober MM, Buckley C Abstract Rhinophyma is a progressive, disfiguring condition that affects the nose and is caused by the hypertrophy of sebaceous glands and connective tissue. Although its exact pathogenesis remains unclear, it is generally thought to be a subtype of the chronic, inflammatory condition rosacea. To date, oral and topical treatments have been largely ineffective at treating rhinophyma. Laser resurfacing is an emerging treatment modality that offers hope for patients with severe rhinophyma. We present a case of rhinophyma treated via fractionated carbon dioxide laser resurfacing with impressive results, excellent tolerability, and minimal downtime. PMID: 30881573 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Effective Treatment of Morbihan's Disease with Long-term Isotretinoin: A Report of Three Cases. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2019 Jan;12(1):32-34 Authors: Olvera-Cortés V, Pulido-Díaz N Abstract Morbihan's disease is characterized by the presence of chronic and persistent edema of the periorbital tissue, forehead, glabella, nose, and cheeks. In some cases, it is related to acne and rosacea, but its exact etiology remains unknown. A defined therapeutic approach has yet to be established for the treatment of Morbihan's disease. To date, the systemic and surgical options attempted have not been very successful and/or do not yield sustained results. Isotretinoin is a key systemic treatment used for the treatment of various skin conditions. However, there are few reports of isotretinoin being used to treat Morbihan's disease. Here, we present the details of three patients with Morbihan's disease who were successfully treated long-term with isotretinoin. PMID: 30881575 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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