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  • Message from the Founder - Volunteers and Transparency

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    In January 2005 the Board of Directors chose me as the director of the RRDi, and Warren Stuart as the Assistant Director. In 2010 we were again voted to serve another five years on the board. Same for 2015 and in 2020. The board decided to make me the treasurer in 2020. 

    Warren was instrumental in forming and establishing the RRDi, helping out with our web site and setting up our member forum. Warren also established a sister site relationship with his Rosacea Forum. Sadly, Warren passed away in 2012 (for more info click here).

    You might be interested in a more detailed history of the RRDi

    An article was written on why I formed the RRDi. You should carefully investigate the other non profit organizations for rosacea and compare how they are run with the RRDi. The big difference is that this non profit is run with a volunteer spirit by rosacea sufferers, a grassroots, patient advocacy effort. The other non profit organizations for rosacea are run by non rosaceans who are businessmen and dermatologists. 


    Volunteers
    This is the driving force behind this non profit organization for rosacea founded by rosacea sufferers. For more information

    Spending
    The one thing you can be sure of is that any donations will NOT be spent on private contractors or salaries at this point since everyone associated with the RRDi are volunteers. This can be done because of the volunteer spirit with which this institute was set up. Can you help? When you join, in the comment box let us know you want to volunteer. If you simply join that would increase our numbers. Any small donation helps us keep going. However, volunteering is what makes this non profit different from the other rosacea non profits (read this post). 

    Research
    A database of research suggestions is being accumulated which you may access or make suggestions by clicking here.

    Who Serves on the Board of Directors
    The RRDi is the only non profit that allows rosaceans any say in determining who is on the board of directors. The other non profits are closed board of directors and if you aren't happy with the direction there is nothing you can do about it. Whatever the direction the RRDi takes, whether to research the cause, or the cure, or whatever is done you can at least know that rosaceans had a say into what research the RRDi will engage in. While the board of directors have the final say on this, you can change who serves on the board of directors who are all rosacea sufferers. Try doing this with the other non profit organizations for rosacea. 

    Transparency
    We believe in transparency. How the RRDi is run is public knowledge. You can clearly review all our financial records. All the other non profits keep their articles of incorporation a deep secret. Their financial records are cryptically revealed in only an IRS Form 990 report that is confusing and difficult to read. That is a big difference. You have a say if you join and become a corporate member. You can vote who is on the board of directors. Can you do that with any other rosacea non profit organization? I have always felt that rosaceans should have a say in what is being done and not leave that up totally to those who may have their own agenda or leave the decision to private contractors. The MAC at the RRDi is just that; a medical ADVISORY committee. The board of directors who are rosaceans make the final decision on the research and all matters. And if you desire, you as a rosacean, if you join the RRDi as a corporate member, can determine who serves on the board of directors.

    Non Profit Organization
    501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status has been approved by the IRS effective June 7, 2004. This means your donation is tax deductible. With such a legacy, you can see the RRDi is a solid non profit organization for rosaceans you can trust. Please join

    Brady Barrows
    RRDi Founder

     



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  • Posts

    • Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2021 Oct 18. doi: 10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Depression and anxiety are common among people with rosacea. However, the exact magnitude of the prevalence rate and odds ratios (ORs) for depression and anxiety, respectively, in rosacea patients is unclear, and no systematic review or meta-analysis of published data has yet been performed. We therefore performed as systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in rosacea patients. METHODS: We performed a systematic search of the PubMed, Embase and Medline databases for all observational studies published up to October 2020 that reported the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. The primary outcome measures were prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the I2 statistic. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup and meta-regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies involving 14,134,021 patients with rosacea were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of depression was 19.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.0-24.3%) and that of anxiety was 15.6% (95% CI 11.8-19.3%). The prevalence of depression and anxiety was significantly lower in studies using clinical criteria to diagnose depression and anxiety (9.2 and 10.2%, respectively) than in those studies using screening tools (26.2% [P < 0.01] and 22.7% [P = 0.03], respectively). The methodological quality of the included studies greatly contributed to the heterogeneity. Patients with rosacea were more likely to experience depression (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.79-2.72) and anxiety (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.56-3.44) than healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that patients with rosacea are at a higher risk of experiencing depression and anxiety. More efforts are warranted to recognize and manage depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. PMID:34657997 | DOI:10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w {url} = URL to article
    • Postepy Dermatol Alergol. 2021 Aug;38(4):590-596. doi: 10.5114/ada.2021.108917. Epub 2021 Sep 17. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Inflammation, immune system disorders, Demodex infestation, neurovascular dysregulation and oxidative stress are thought to be contributory factors in the pathogenesis of rosacea. AIM: To evaluate the presence of Demodex mites, the morphologic features of the nailfold capillaries, and the systemic oxidative stress status in patients with rosacea. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed with rosacea and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects were included in this prospective case-control study. The presence of Demodex infestation, the findings of nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), and the status of systemic oxidative stress measured by total oxidant capacity (TOC), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and oxidative stress index (OSI) were evaluated. RESULTS: Demodex infestation rates were significantly higher in rosacea patients than in controls (p = 0.001). Increases in the diameters of the capillaries and the presence of avascular areas and crossing and abnormal structures were significantly more common in rosacea patients than in the healthy controls (p < 0.01, p = 0.016, p = 0.02, p < 0.001, respectively), and hairpin structures were significantly less common in rosacea patients than in the controls (p < 0.001). The presence of crossing capillaries was positively correlated with higher TOC levels (p = 0.05), while abnormal structures were found to be correlated with lower levels of TAC (p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative status and NFC may play diagnostic and prognostic roles in rosacea, which should be confirmed by studies with larger sample sizes. PMID:34658699 | PMC:PMC8501418 | DOI:10.5114/ada.2021.108917 {url} = URL to article
    • J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2021 Oct 17. doi: 10.1111/jdv.17758. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Few studies have investigated the relationship between rosacea and upper gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, with two studies reporting conflicting data that patients with rosacea are at higher risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).1, 2 Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate a potential relationship between rosacea and GI disorders with a focus on the upper GI tract defined as the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. PMID:34661953 | DOI:10.1111/jdv.17758 {url} = URL to article
    • Cureus. 2021 Aug 31;13(8):e17617. doi: 10.7759/cureus.17617. eCollection 2021 Aug. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The multifactorial nature of rosacea and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) pathogenesis complicates the achievement of satisfactory treatment outcomes. 13C urea breath test (UBT) has been identified as an accurate, non-invasive, and quick procedure to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with high sensitivity and specificity. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aim to assess the correlation between H. pylori infection and rosacea and CSU patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted on patients with rosacea and CSU in the dermatology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. History and physical examination were performed by a dermatologist. H. pylori 13C-UBT detection was performed in all subjects. RESULTS: In total, 114 patients were included in this current study, with 41 rosacea and 73 urticaria patients. The vast majority of our subjects were females (96.5%). The mean (±SD) age was 42.3 (±12.7). More than half (58.8%) of the examined samples were positive for 13C-UBT; however, positive results were significantly higher in the rosacea patients (73.2%) compared to the urticaria group (50.7%), with a p-value of 0.019. CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the significant association of H. pylori with rosacea and CSU regardless of the presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. We thus recommend the inclusion of H. pylori testing in the routine workup of CSU and rosacea patients. PMID:34646668 | PMC:PMC8483814 | DOI:10.7759/cureus.17617 {url} = URL to article
    • Acta Derm Venereol. 2021 Oct 13. doi: 10.2340/actadv.v101.356. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Rosacea, a chronic condition usually recognized by its visible presentation, can be accompanied by invisible symptoms, such as burning and stinging. This aim of this review is to gather the most recent evidence on burning and stinging, in order to further emphasize the need to address these symptoms. Inflammatory pathways can explain both the signs and symptoms of rosacea, but available treatments are still evaluated primarily on their ability to treat visible signs. Recent evidence also highlights the adverse impact of symptoms, particularly burning and stinging, on quality of life. Despite an increasing understanding of symptoms and their impact, the management of burning and stinging as part of rosacea treatment has not been widely investigated. Clinicians often underestimate the impact of these symptoms and do not routinely include them as part of management. Available therapies for rosacea have the potential to treat beyond signs, and improve burning and stinging symptoms in parallel. Further investigation is needed to better understand these benefits and to optimize the management of rosacea. PMID:34643244 | DOI:10.2340/actadv.v101.356 {url} = URL to article More Information on Burning and Stinging in Rosacea
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