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  • Message from the Founder - Volunteers and Transparency


    In January 2005 the Board of Directors chose me as the director of the RRDi, and Warren Stuart as the Assistant Director. In 2010 we were again voted to serve another five years on the board. Warren was instrumental in forming and establishing the RRDi, helping out with our web site and setting up our member forum. Warren also established a sister site relationship with his Rosacea Forum. Sadly, Warren passed away in 2012 (for more info click here). In 2015 I was again voted to serve another five years on the board as director. 

    You might be interested in a more detailed history of the RRDi

    An article was written on why I formed the RRDi. You should carefully investigate the other non profit organizations for rosacea and compare how they are run with the RRDi. The big difference is that this non profit is run with a volunteer spirit by rosacea sufferers. 

    What other non profit organization for rosacea is run by volunteers? This is the driving force behind this non profit organization for rosacea founded by rosacea sufferers. 

    The one thing you can be sure of is that any donations will NOT be spent on private contractors or salaries at this point since everyone associated with the RRDi are volunteers. This can be done because of the volunteer spirit with which this institute was set up. Can you help? When you join, in the comment box let us know you want to volunteer. If you simply join that would increase our numbers. Any small donation helps us keep going. However, volunteering is what makes this non profit different from the other rosacea non profits (read this post). 

    A database of research suggestions is being accumulated which you may access or make suggestions by clicking here.

    The RRDi is the only non profit that allows rosaceans any say in determining who is on the board of directors. The other non profits are closed board of directors and if you aren't happy with the direction there is nothing you can do about it. Whatever the direction the RRDi takes, whether to research the cause, or the cure, or whatever is done you can at least know that rosaceans had a say into what research the RRDi will engage in. The board of directors have the final say on this.

    We believe in transparency. How the RRDi is run is public knowledge. You can clearly review all our financial records. All the other non profits keep their articles of incorporation a deep secret. Their financial records are cryptically revealed in only an IRS Form 990 report that is confusing and difficult to read. That is a big difference. You have a say if you join and become a corporate member. You can vote who is on the board of directors. Can you do that with any other rosacea non profit organization? I have always felt that rosaceans should have a say in what is being done and not leave that up totally to those who may have their own agenda or leave the decision to private contractors. The MAC at the RRDi is just that; a medical ADVISORY committee. The board of directors who are rosaceans make the final decision on the research and all matters. And if you desire, you as a rosacean, if you join the RRDi as a corporate member, can determine who serves on the board of directors.

    Non Profit Organization

    501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status has been approved by the IRS effective June 7, 2004. With such a legacy, you can see the RRDi is a solid non profit organization for rosaceans you can trust. Please join

    Brady Barrows
    RRDi Founder


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    • Related Articles Psychosocial aspects of rosacea with a focus on anxiety and depression. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2018;11:103-107 Authors: Heisig M, Reich A Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition characterized by facial redness and inflammatory lesions. The disease can lead to social stigmatization and may significantly reduce the quality of life of patients. Psychosocial impact of rosacea can be severe and debilitating; however, it is still underestimated.
      Objective: This paper provides a literature review focused on depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea.
      Conclusion: Rosacea patients have an increased risk of developing depression and anxiety and tend to avoid social situations. However, there are still limited data on this condition. Effective treatment of clinical symptoms brings significant improvement in psychological symptoms. Further studies should be conducted to investigate in more detail the psychological impact of rosacea. In addition, improvement of the efficacy of rosacea treatment is still needed.
      PMID: 29551906 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Genome-Wide Analysis Characterization and Evolution of SBP Genes in Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume. Front Genet. 2018;9:64 Authors: Abdullah M, Cao Y, Cheng X, Shakoor A, Su X, Gao J, Cai Y Abstract
      The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors in plants. SBP TFs are known to play important functions in a diverse development process and also related in the process of evolutionary novelties. SBP gene family has been characterized in several plant species, but little is known about molecular evolution, functional divergence and comprehensive study of SBP gene family in Rosacea. We carried out genome-wide investigations and identified 14, 32, 17, and 17 SBP genes from four Rosacea species (Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume, respectively). According to phylogenetic analysis arranged the SBP protein sequences in seven groups. Localization of SBP genes presented an uneven distribution on corresponding chromosomes of Rosacea species. Our analyses designated that the SBP genes duplication events (segmental and tandem) and divergence. In addition, due to highly conserved structure pattern of SBP genes, recommended that highly conserved region of microsyneteny in the Rosacea species. Type I and II functional divergence was detected among various amino acids in SBP proteins, while there was no positive selection according to substitutional model analysis using PMAL software. These results recommended that the purifying selection might be leading force during the evolution process and dominate conservation of SBP genes in Rosacea species according to environmental selection pressure analysis. Our results will provide basic understanding and foundation for future research insights on the evolution of the SBP genes in Rosacea.
      PMID: 29552026 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Quality of Life in Individuals with Erythematotelangiectatic and Papulopustular Rosacea: Findings From a Web-based Survey. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2018 Feb;11(2):47-52 Authors: Zeichner JA, Eichenfield LF, Feldman SR, Kasteler JS, Ferrusi IL Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of rosacea on self-perception, emotional, social, and overall well-being and quality of life in individuals with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) and papulopustular rosacea (PPR). DESIGN: We distributed a cross-sectional email invitation for participants in the United States to fill out a web-based survey. PARTICIPANTS: We included adults who reported having previously received a diagnosis of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea or papulopustular rosacea. MEASUREMENTS: Questionnaires measured the psychosocial aspects of rosacea, including the Satisfaction With Appearance Scale and modified Satisfaction With Appearance Scale questionnaires, Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Redness, Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life questionnaire, and RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. The Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Bumps or Pimples was administered to the papulopustular rosacea cohort. RESULTS: Six hundred participants enrolled and completed the survey, with most rating their rosacea as mild or moderate (ETR: 95.6%; PPR: 93.7%). In the erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts, respectively, 45 and 53 percent disagreed/strongly disagreed that they were satisfied with their appearance due to rosacea; 42 and 27 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they "worry how people will react when they see my rosacea"; and 43 and 59 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they feel their rosacea is unattractive to others. Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life total and domain scores indicated negative impact of rosacea for both cohorts. Both cohorts reported worse 36-item Short Form Health Survey overall and domain scores than population norms in the United States. CONCLUSION: Rosacea had wide-ranging, negative effects on self-perceptions and emotional, social, and overall well-being as well as rosacea-specific quality of life. Overall, both erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts reported a substantial negative impact of rosacea on quality of life on a range of instruments.
      PMID: 29552276 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • "Acne rosacea, or more commonly called just rosacea, affects 14 million people in the U.S., or five percent of the population, and is sometimes said to be an adult version of acne vulgaris." Rosacea affects 5 percent of population, Richard P. Holm, Medical Doctor, Argus Leader, Part of the USA Network, Dec 11, 2017
    • Martin Schaller, MD, from the Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen in Germany has co-wrote a paper that proposes using topical Ivermectin (Soolantra) to treat ocular rosacea. Dr. Schaller is a member of the RRDi MAC.  Br J Dermatol. 2018 Mar 12. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16534. 
      Successful therapy of ocular rosacea with topical ivermectin.
      Schaller M, Pietschke K. This was first announced by David Pascoe at RSG.