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  • Welcome to the Rosacea Research and Development Institute [RRDi] official web site. The RRDi is a 501 (c) 3 non profit organization. If you suffer from rosacea you are a rosacean. Join us to find the cure. 

    We are rosaceans. Our non profit organization for rosacea patient advocacy web site is a digital data repository of rosacea information. You can add more information to our web site by joining and posting in our member forum becoming a part of 'finding the cure' for rosacea if you join. Our goal is 10,000 members. You can help us reach our goal by joining

    Where to Begin Your Search
    Community Support • About Us • What Causes Rosacea? • What Should I Ask My Physician?Rosacea NewbiesFamous RosaceansRosacea in the NewsTapatalk • Contact us
    Suggest you read our FAQs for at least a half hour. After that browse our member forum for another half hour. 

    What is Rosacea?
    Rosacea is a chronic and sometimes progressive disorder of the face, characterized by some or all of the following symptoms:

    Extremely sensitive facial skin with blushing, flushing, permanent redness, burning, stinging, swelling, papules, pustules, broken red capillary veins, red gritty eyes (which can lead to visual disturbances) and in more advanced cases, a disfiguring bulbous nose. Men and women of all ages can be affected, with over 415 million estimated rosacea sufferers worldwide

    "Rosacea is probably a collection of many different diseases that are lumped together inappropriately." Zoe Diana Draelos, MD. 
    Dr. Draelos is a member of the ROSIE [ROSacea International Expert] Group that says the subtype classification of rosacea is controversial. Dr. Draelos is also a member of the RRDi MAC. Just because you have a red face might mean you have another skin condition instead of or with rosacea, since other skin conditions may co-exist with rosaceamimic rosacea or you might have a rosacea variant (a dozen variants to differentiate).  

    "Rosacea is a multifactorial, hyper-reactivity, vascular and neural based disease with a broad range of facial manifestations where normal vasodilation is greater and more persistent and involves an autoimmune component of microscopic amounts of extravasated plasma induce localized dermal inflammation that may induce repeated external triggers, vasodilation, telangiectasias, redness with eventual fibrosis and hypertrophic scarring of the dermis." Sandra Cremers, M.D., F.A.C.S., RRDi MAC Member.

    If you note, there are different definitions of what constitutes rosacea which is common. Clarity with phenotypes (see below) helps in a differential diagnosis. 

    Phenotypes
    In November 2016, the RRDi endorsed the phenotype classification of rosacea which was announced by the ROSCO panel as a better approach of diagnosising rosacea than using subtypes.

    Rosacea Differential Diagnosis and Misdiagnosis
    Your physician should differentiate rosacea from a plethora of other skin conditions. If you need photos of rosacea click here.

    Sometimes rosacea is misdiagnosed.

    Treatment
    'There are a number of topical, oral and systemic treatments available. Yet, treatment for rosacea remains difficult." Expert Opinion Pharmacotherapy 

    “There’s no one treatment that’s going to work for everybody, but we evaluate each patient individually and try to select the treatments from our armamentarium that we think will be the simplest and safest for long-term control.” John Meisenheimer, MD, Orlando, The City's Magazine

    ""Ultimately, rosacea is a subjective and entirely individual experience." Rosacea: Beyond the visable

    Cause of Rosacea
    No one really knows what causes rosacea and there are a number of theories for your consideration. Our latest article on this subject, Rosacea Theories Revisited is worth your time to consider. 

    What will the RRDi Do For Me?
    You can view the list of prescription treatments prescribed for rosacea. There is a list of non prescription treatments for rosacea to consider. We have an affiliate store dedicated to rosacea books, treatments and odd and ends. You can browse our public member forum and learn about rosacea. The digital medical revolution can assist you in your search for a treatment to improve your condition. Your rosacea is an individual case and you need to find what treatment will work for your rosacea and not a treatment aimed at the masses. Individuals can come together and share data, using collaboration tools that the RRDi offers for free. If you have the volunteer spirit and want to become part of this innovative non profit, learn how you can volunteer and be part of this digital medical revolution. You can post in our member forum if you join and register simply with an email address. If you have concerns regarding your privacy, please consider this post.

    Once you join you have a number of tools to collaborate with other members. You can create your own rosacea blog, with easy step by step directions on how to do this. Our Gallery application lets members share photos and videos with the community. Volunteers who contribute their time and energy may receive a free G Suite account through a generous contribution of Google, one of our sponsors.  

    You may receive a free ebook, Rosacea 101: Includes the Rosacea Diet as a gift from the founder/director if you mention in your registration application that you want the free ebook (write in the volunteer box you want the free ebook).

    You can post in our member forum about your rosacea experience. However, we want real members, not spammers, hackers or trolls. We provide a safe, secure forum for our members, so our membership registration is very secure requiring your accepting our terms for membership.

    Our 2016 Rosacea Survey is completed and available for public viewing.  You may review a list of our education grants. Finally, ask not what the RRDi can do for you, ask.....

    What Can You Do for the RRDi?
    Your joining and registering with our organization will increase our membership. All that is required to join is an email address (your email address is private and members never see your email address nor does the RRDi give your private email address out to anyone). Our goal is to reach a membership of 10,000 members. Think about that, 10,000 rosacea sufferers joined together as a non profit organization and you are member. We need you to join to help us reach this goal!

    The RRDi is a volunteeer member driven organization and invites rosacea sufferers to become involved. Volunteering is the force that drives the organization and is an integral spirit of the RRDi philosophy. The RRDi warmly invites rosacea sufferers to participate in this non profit which you can become a part of. You are not required to volunteer when you join, since we still want you to join even if you can't volunteer. If all you can do is become a member, that will increase our membership which is helpful in itself. So if you can volunteer, let us know on the application. Please join

    Please carefully read the next subheading on how to join and if you have concerns about privacy. 

    How to Join
    Members may now join with just an email address and a display name (your first and last name is no longer required to be a non voting member and you can set up a anonymous or cryptic display name so that no one knows who you are). To post in our Member Forum or submit articles for publication you must register to join to become a member. The RRDi no longer requires that you provide us with your contact info and mailing address to be a non voting member. However you still need to agree to our policies, rules, etc., since you become a member of the RRDi whether a voting member or not. If you want to vote, simply include all the profile contact fields. We have over 1000 members who are voting members, so we have plenty. It is your choice if you want to vote or not. 

    If you need assistance contact us. Our volunteers will be happy to assist you. 

    Your privacy is our utmost concern and we will take precautions to ensure your privacy will never be violated. Our Privacy Policy is solid. If you have concerns regarding your privacy, please consider this post.

    Once you have joined you can post in our secure members forum which will allow you to post questions to the Medical Advisory Consultants (MAC) and to fellow members or to submit articles for our journal. Yes, members may have an article published on our web site or in our journal. You may receive a free G Suite account with our organization if you have the volunteer spirit. 

    Charter and Mission Statement
    The Charter of the Corporation states the purpose and Mission Statement which clearly outlines the goals of our non profit corporation. If you are interested in the history of how and why this non profit organization was formed click here for more information

    Of course there are expenses to keep this non profit organization going. Any donation you give will assist us to continue to keep this web site going, publish our journal, and sponsor education grantsMahalo for your donation. even if it is small. Every dollar helps us keep going.  

    The RRDi is registered at GuideStar

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  • Posts

    • [Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma: A case report]. Arch Argent Pediatr. 2019 Feb 01;117(1):e56-e58 Authors: Garais JA, Bonetto VN, Frontino L, Salduna MD, Ruiz Lascano A Abstract
      Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma is a childhood condition characterized by asymptomatic erythematous-violaceous nodules, often confused with abscesses. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors have postulated its relationship with infantile rosacea. We present a case of a patient with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma, with ocular involvement and a good response to oral metronidazole treatment.
      PMID: 30652457 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Rosacea: Relative risk vs Absolute Risk of Malignant Comorbidities. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Jan 14;: Authors: Tjahjono LA, Cline A, Huang WW, Fleischer AB, Feldman SR PMID: 30654083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Trigger, tripwire, flareup and flush. These are probably the four most common terms used when discussing rosacea. Because of poor communication and rosaceans not understanding what there terms actually mean much confusion results, adding to the already confusing dilemma of rosacea understanding. So to set the record: 

      Flare up according to the NRS is "a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples.."  

      Tripwire or Trigger is the same thing according to the NRS who uses these words interchangeably and states that both terms mean, "factors that may cause a rosacea sufferer to experience a flare-up—a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples. [1]

      A medical dictionary source defines flush as: flush 1. transient, episodic redness of the face and neck caused by certain diseases, ingestion of certain drugs or other substances, heat, emotional factors, or physical exertion. See also erythema. [2]

      A blush is a flush usually caused by psychological factors. A flush can be caused by a any number of factors as noted above including psychological factors. 

      The reason this is brought up is that while most rosaceans confuse flushing with a flare up there are rosaceans who report having a flare up of rosacea and DO NOT FLUSH. These ones are admittedly fewer in number, and flushing is usually associated with a flare up, but nevertheless demonstrates that flushing is not necessarily a rosacea flare up. One could flush or blush and the skin returns to normal in a rosacea sufferer. Flushing does not NECESSARILY mean a rosacea flare up and it only means that it MAY produce a rosacea flare up. Those who think flushing is rosacea is like thinking pimples mean you have rosacea (or for that matter, believing that erythema is rosacea). There is more to a diagnosis of rosacea than simply having pimples and erythema (see Diagnosis). For example, one could have erythema and have Atopic Dermatitis, not rosacea.  Flushing is one of the signs or symptoms usually associated with rosacea, but not necessarily required. Pimples are associated with rosacea but not necessarily required, i.e., Phenotype 2. Rosacea is always associated with redness or erythema.  Hopefully, if rosaceans understand these terms, trigger, tripwire, flareup and flush better, we will all be on the same page when we discuss rosacea. 

      End Notes

      [1] Coping With Rosacea, National Rosacea Society, page 1

      [2] Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary
    • Trends in Oral Antibiotic Prescription in Dermatology, 2008 to 2016. JAMA Dermatol. 2019 Jan 16;: Authors: Barbieri JS, Bhate K, Hartnett KP, Fleming-Dutra KE, Margolis DJ Abstract
      Importance: Dermatologists prescribe more oral antibiotic courses per clinician than any other specialty, and this use puts patients at risk of antibiotic-resistant infections and antibiotic-associated adverse events.
      Objective: To characterize the temporal trends in the diagnoses most commonly associated with oral antibiotic prescription by dermatologists, as well as the duration of this use.
      Design, Setting, and Participants: Repeated cross-sectional analysis of antibiotic prescribing by dermatologists from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2016. The setting was Optum Clinformatics Data Mart (Eden Prairie, Minnesota) deidentified commercial claims data. Participants were dermatology clinicians identified by their National Uniform Claim Committee taxonomy codes, and courses of oral antibiotics prescribed by these clinicians were identified by their National Drug Codes.
      Exposures: Claims for oral antibiotic prescriptions were consolidated into courses of therapy and associated with the primary diagnosis from the most recent visit. Courses were stratified into those of extended duration (>28 days) and those of short duration (≤28 days).
      Main Outcomes and Measures: Frequency of antibiotic prescribing and associated diagnoses. Poisson regression models were used to assess for changes in the frequency of antibiotic prescribing over time.
      Results: Between 2008 and 2016 among 985 866 courses of oral antibiotics prescribed by 11 986 unique dermatologists, overall antibiotic prescribing among dermatologists decreased 36.6% (1.23 courses per 100 visits) from 3.36 (95% CI, 3.34-3.38) to 2.13 (95% CI, 2.12-2.14) courses per 100 visits with a dermatologist (prevalence rate ratio for annual change, 0.931; 95% CI, 0.930-0.932), with much of this decrease occurring among extended courses for acne and rosacea. Oral antibiotic use associated with surgical visits increased 69.6% (2.73 courses per 100 visits) from 3.92 (95% CI, 3.83-4.01) to 6.65 (95% CI, 6.57-6.74) courses per 100 visits associated with a surgical visit (prevalence rate ratio, 1.061; 95% CI, 1.059-1.063).
      Conclusions and Relevance: Continuing to develop alternatives to oral antibiotics for noninfectious conditions, such as acne, can improve antibiotic stewardship and decrease complications from antibiotic use. In addition, the rising use of postoperative antibiotics after surgical visits is concerning and may put patients at unnecessary risk of adverse events. Future studies are needed to identify the value of this practice and the risk of adverse events.
      PMID: 30649187 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Exploring the potential for rosacea therapeutics of siRNA dispersion in topical emulsions. Exp Dermatol. 2019 Jan 16;: Authors: Colombo S, Harmankaya N, Water JJ, Bohr A Abstract
      Rosacea is a prevalent skin condition dependent on the individual genetic profile. The current pharmacological management of this condition is mostly based on small molecule drugs predominately effective in ameliorating the inflammatory condition. Emerging molecular approaches could present an opportunity for managing rosacea conditions at transcriptomic level, and in the future allow personalized approaches. RNA medicines, such as small RNA interference (siRNA), could provide a flexible and applicable tool reaching this aim. However, the topical siRNA delivery by dermatological emulsions, commonly used in the daily management of rosacea, is still largely unexplored. Consequently, RNA interference application to rosacea was defined on molecular bases by genetic expression meta-data analysis. Based on this, an siRNA directed against TLR2 was designed and validated in vitro on murine macrophages and fibroblasts. Next, siRNA was dispersed in the continuous phase of emulsions and was characterized for commonly used dermatologic bases. Finally, the potential delivery performance of the topical emulsions was tested in vivo on healthy Balb/c mice. It was found that the interaction of siRNA with combination of excipients such as urea and glycerol, is likely to favor the siRNA delivery, inducing genetic silencing of TLR2. These findings provide a foundation for the future development of topical RNA-based dispersions for topical molecular medicines, by emphasizing on the formulation and therapeutic-based opportunities with dermatological treatments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
      PMID: 30650201 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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