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  • Welcome to the RRDi official web site. Finding the Cure. 

    Where to Begin Your Search
    Suggest you read our FAQs for at least a half hour. After that browse our member forum for another half hour. 
    Tapatalk • About Us • What Causes Rosacea? • What Should I Ask My Physician?Rosacea NewbiesFamous RosaceansRosacea in the News • Contact us

    What is Rosacea?
    Rosacea is a chronic and sometimes progressive disorder of the face, characterized by some or all of the following symptoms:

    Extremely sensitive facial skin with blushing, flushing, permanent redness, burning, stinging, swelling, papules, pustules, broken red capillary veins, red gritty eyes (which can lead to visual disturbances) and in more advanced cases, a disfiguring bulbous nose. Men and women of all ages can be affected, with over 75 million estimated Rosacea Sufferers worldwide

    "Rosacea is probably a collection of many different diseases that are lumped together inappropriately." Zoe Diana Draelos, MD. 
    Dr. Draelos is a member of the ROSIE [ROSacea International Expert] Group that says the subtype classification of rosacea is controversial. Dr. Draelos is also a member of the RRDi MAC. Just because you have a red face might mean you have another skin condition instead of or with rosacea, since other skin conditions may co-exist with rosaceamimic rosacea or you might have a rosacea variant

    "Rosacea is a multifactorial, hyper-reactivity, vascular and neural based disease with a broad range of facial manifestations where normal vasodilation is greater and more persistent and involves an autoimmune component of microscopic amounts of extravasated plasma induce localized dermal inflammation that may induce repeated external triggers, vasodilation, telangiectasias, redness with eventual fibrosis and hypertrophic scarring of the dermis." Sandra Cremers, M.D., F.A.C.S., RRDi MAC Member.

    'There are a number of topical, oral and systemic treatments available. Yet, treatment for rosacea remains difficult." Expert Opinion Pharmacotherapy 
    Treatment options.

    In November 2016, the RRDi endorsed the phenotype classification of rosacea which was announced by the ROSCO panel as a better approach of diagnosising rosacea than subtypes.

    Rosacea Differential Diagnosis and Misdiagnosis
    Your physician should differentiate rosacea from a plethora of other skin conditions. If you need photos of rosacea click here.

    Sometimes rosacea is misdiagnosed.

    Cause of Rosacea
    No one really knows what causes rosacea and there are a number of theories for your consideration. Our latest article on this subject, Rosacea Theories Revisited is worth your time to consider. 

    What will the RRDi Do For Me?
    You can view the list of prescription treatments prescribed for rosacea. There is a list of non prescription treatments for rosacea to consider. We have an affiliate store dedicated to rosacea books, treatments and odd and ends. You can browse our public member forum and learn about rosacea. The digital medical revolution can assist you in your search for a treatment to improve your condition. Your rosacea is an individual case and you need to find what treatment will work for your rosacea and not a treatment aimed at the masses. Individuals can come together and share data, using collaboration tools that the RRDi offers for free. If you have the volunteer spirit and want to become part of this innovative non profit, learn how you can volunteer and be part of this digital medical revolution. You can post in our member forum if you join and register simply with an email address. If you have concerns regarding your privacy, please consider this post.

    Once you join you have a number of tools to collaborate with other members. You can create your own rosacea blog, with easy step by step directions on how to do this. Our Gallery application lets members share photos and videos with the community. Volunteers who contribute their time and energy may receive a free G Suite account through a generous contribution of Google, one of our sponsors.  

    You may receive a free ebook, Rosacea 101: Includes the Rosacea Diet as a gift from the founder/director if you mention in your registration application that you want the free ebook (write in the volunteer box you want the free ebook).

    Our 2016 Rosacea Survey is completed and available for public viewing.  You may review a list of our education grants. Finally, ask not what the RRDi can do for you, ask.....

    What Can You Do for the RRDi?
    Your joining and registering with our organization will increase our membership. All that is required to join is an email address (your email address is private and members never see your email address nor does the RRDi give your private email address out to anyone). What if the RRDi reached a membership of 10,000 members? Think about that, 10,000 rosacea sufferers joined together as a non profit organization and you are member. We need you to join to help us reach this goal!

    The RRDi is a volunteeer member driven organization and invites rosacea sufferers to become involved. Volunteering is the force that drives the organization and is an integral spirit of the RRDi philosophy. The RRDi warmly invites rosacea sufferers to participate in this non profit which you can become a part of. You are not required to volunteer when you join, since we still want you to join even if you can't volunteer. If all you can do is become a member, that will increase our membership which is helpful in itself. So if you can volunteer, let us know on the application. Please join

    You can post in our member forum about your rosacea experience. However, we want real members, not spammers, hackers or trolls. We provide a safe, secure forum for our members, so our membership registration is very secure requiring your accepting our terms for membership. Please carefully read the next subheading on how to join and if you have concerns about privacy. 

    How to Join
    Members may now join with just an email address and a display name (your first and last name is no longer required to be a non voting member and you can set up a anonymous or cryptic display name so that no one knows who you are). To post in our Member Forum or submit articles for publication you must register to join to become a member. The RRDi no longer requires that you provide us with your contact info and mailing address to be a non voting member. However you still need to agree to our policies, rules, etc., since you become a member of the RRDi whether a voting member or not. If you want to vote, simply include all the profile contact fields. We have over 1000 members who are voting members, so we have plenty. It is your choice if you want to vote or not. 

    If you need assistance contact us. Our volunteers will be happy to assist you. 

    Your privacy is our utmost concern and we will take precautions to ensure your privacy will never be violated. Our Privacy Policy is solid. If you have concerns regarding your privacy, please consider this post.

    Once you have joined you can post in our secure members forum which will allow you to post questions to the Medical Advisory Consultants (MAC) and to fellow members or to submit articles for our journal. Yes, members may have an article published on our web site or in our journal. You may receive a free G Suite account with our organization if you have the volunteer spirit. 

    The Charter of the Corporation states the purpose and Mission Statement which clearly outlines the goals of our non profit corporation. If you are interested in the history of how and why this non profit organization was formed click here for more information

    Of course there are expenses to keep this non profit organization going. Any donation you give will assist us to continue to keep this web site going, publish our journal, and sponsor education grantsMahalo for your donation. even if it is small. Every dollar helps us keep going.  

    The RRDi is registered at GuideStar

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    • Related Articles Psychosocial aspects of rosacea with a focus on anxiety and depression. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2018;11:103-107 Authors: Heisig M, Reich A Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition characterized by facial redness and inflammatory lesions. The disease can lead to social stigmatization and may significantly reduce the quality of life of patients. Psychosocial impact of rosacea can be severe and debilitating; however, it is still underestimated.
      Objective: This paper provides a literature review focused on depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea.
      Conclusion: Rosacea patients have an increased risk of developing depression and anxiety and tend to avoid social situations. However, there are still limited data on this condition. Effective treatment of clinical symptoms brings significant improvement in psychological symptoms. Further studies should be conducted to investigate in more detail the psychological impact of rosacea. In addition, improvement of the efficacy of rosacea treatment is still needed.
      PMID: 29551906 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Genome-Wide Analysis Characterization and Evolution of SBP Genes in Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume. Front Genet. 2018;9:64 Authors: Abdullah M, Cao Y, Cheng X, Shakoor A, Su X, Gao J, Cai Y Abstract
      The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors in plants. SBP TFs are known to play important functions in a diverse development process and also related in the process of evolutionary novelties. SBP gene family has been characterized in several plant species, but little is known about molecular evolution, functional divergence and comprehensive study of SBP gene family in Rosacea. We carried out genome-wide investigations and identified 14, 32, 17, and 17 SBP genes from four Rosacea species (Fragaria vesca, Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume, respectively). According to phylogenetic analysis arranged the SBP protein sequences in seven groups. Localization of SBP genes presented an uneven distribution on corresponding chromosomes of Rosacea species. Our analyses designated that the SBP genes duplication events (segmental and tandem) and divergence. In addition, due to highly conserved structure pattern of SBP genes, recommended that highly conserved region of microsyneteny in the Rosacea species. Type I and II functional divergence was detected among various amino acids in SBP proteins, while there was no positive selection according to substitutional model analysis using PMAL software. These results recommended that the purifying selection might be leading force during the evolution process and dominate conservation of SBP genes in Rosacea species according to environmental selection pressure analysis. Our results will provide basic understanding and foundation for future research insights on the evolution of the SBP genes in Rosacea.
      PMID: 29552026 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Quality of Life in Individuals with Erythematotelangiectatic and Papulopustular Rosacea: Findings From a Web-based Survey. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2018 Feb;11(2):47-52 Authors: Zeichner JA, Eichenfield LF, Feldman SR, Kasteler JS, Ferrusi IL Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of rosacea on self-perception, emotional, social, and overall well-being and quality of life in individuals with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) and papulopustular rosacea (PPR). DESIGN: We distributed a cross-sectional email invitation for participants in the United States to fill out a web-based survey. PARTICIPANTS: We included adults who reported having previously received a diagnosis of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea or papulopustular rosacea. MEASUREMENTS: Questionnaires measured the psychosocial aspects of rosacea, including the Satisfaction With Appearance Scale and modified Satisfaction With Appearance Scale questionnaires, Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Redness, Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life questionnaire, and RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. The Impact Assessment for Rosacea Facial Bumps or Pimples was administered to the papulopustular rosacea cohort. RESULTS: Six hundred participants enrolled and completed the survey, with most rating their rosacea as mild or moderate (ETR: 95.6%; PPR: 93.7%). In the erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts, respectively, 45 and 53 percent disagreed/strongly disagreed that they were satisfied with their appearance due to rosacea; 42 and 27 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they "worry how people will react when they see my rosacea"; and 43 and 59 percent agreed/strongly agreed that they feel their rosacea is unattractive to others. Rosacea-Specific Quality-of-Life total and domain scores indicated negative impact of rosacea for both cohorts. Both cohorts reported worse 36-item Short Form Health Survey overall and domain scores than population norms in the United States. CONCLUSION: Rosacea had wide-ranging, negative effects on self-perceptions and emotional, social, and overall well-being as well as rosacea-specific quality of life. Overall, both erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papulopustular rosacea cohorts reported a substantial negative impact of rosacea on quality of life on a range of instruments.
      PMID: 29552276 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • "Acne rosacea, or more commonly called just rosacea, affects 14 million people in the U.S., or five percent of the population, and is sometimes said to be an adult version of acne vulgaris." Rosacea affects 5 percent of population, Richard P. Holm, Medical Doctor, Argus Leader, Part of the USA Network, Dec 11, 2017
    • Martin Schaller, MD, from the Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen in Germany has co-wrote a paper that proposes using topical Ivermectin (Soolantra) to treat ocular rosacea. Dr. Schaller is a member of the RRDi MAC.  Br J Dermatol. 2018 Mar 12. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16534. 
      Successful therapy of ocular rosacea with topical ivermectin.
      Schaller M, Pietschke K. This was first announced by David Pascoe at RSG. 
    • A number of reports from patients who have used photo dynamic therapy [PDT] complain of hair loss, particularly males. Here is a list:  samoht  timo  [more will be added if anyone posts in this thread] The main point is that you should be aware that PDT has a risk of hair loss. Apparently PDT can be used to stimulate hair growth or eliminate hair growth, depending on the desired treatment.  "Several new devices (in-office procedures and at-home devices) are being touted to reverse hair loss and restore hair growth..." [1] "Our results suggest that PDT can damage the nonpigmented hair matrix, but not stem cells or dermal papillae. Repeated PDT may impair the hair-regeneration capacity via a bystander effect on bulge stem cells or dermal papillae. In this study, we found it was possible to remove nonpigmented hair using PDT" [2] "Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB) offered a successful PDT system in selectively damaging hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. The current PDT system provides better outcome than hair destruction through laser heat transfer procedures and laser-mediated hair removal, due to complete destruction of hair follicles." [3] "Here at WellMedica we treat hair loss and alopecia through Low Level Laser Therapy."  "An experimental method combining chemicals and radiation to induce controlled hair loss or reduction" Hair Facts, Photodynamic therapy hair removal End Notes [1] New generation of laser and light therapies could provide future treatment options for skin, hair and nail conditions
      American Academy of Dermatology’s 70th Annual Meeting by Molly Wanner, MD, FAAD, instructor at Harvard Medical School and dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.  [2] Lasers Surg Med. 2016 Oct;48(8):748-762. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22570. Epub 2016 Aug 9.
      Nonpigmented hair removal using photodynamic therapy in animal model.
      Shin H, Yoon JS2,, Koh W, Kim JY2,, Kim CH, Han KM, Kim EJ, Kwon  [3] Photodynamic therapy for hair removal
      Mohamed H.M. Ali, Mohamed M. Hashem, Amr Zaher, Soheir Korraa, Farouk Hamouda, Carmen M. Ali, Khalid A. Al-Saad
      QScience Connect 2013:16