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    We have completed two surveys with our members and general public.  These surveys were developed with the input of our RRDi Medical Advisory Consultants, and consists of questions of most concern to these doctors when diagnosing rosacea and based upon last year's survey. The more members respond to the survey, the more accurate and complete will be our picture of the rosacea experience of our extensive community, so your input is highly valued by the RRDi.

    To review our survey results click here

    We appreciate your continued support of the RRDi in helping to find a cure for rosacea.

    Thanks very much for your participation.

    Brady Barrows
    RRDi Director

    Joanne Whitehead, Ph.D.
    RRDi Assistant Director
    RRDi Journal Editor in Chief

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    • Related ArticlesRosacea and the gastrointestinal system. Australas J Dermatol. 2020 Aug 06;: Authors: Searle T, Ali FR, Carolides S, Al-Niaimi F Abstract Rosacea is a common skin condition characterised by erythema, papules and pustules. Increasing evidence suggests that the gut-skin axis is implicated in the pathogenesis of rosacea. Sufficient evidence exists to support the notion that the gut microbiome plays a role in the inflammatory cutaneous response and there appear to be associations with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. A dysbiotic microbiome and an innate immune system dysregulation contribute to the pathophysiology of rosacea, and further exploration of their roles is warranted. Greater understanding of this condition and the effect of the gut-skin axis could allow for more efficacious and timely treatment. This article reviews our current findings and understanding in the skin and gut relationship in rosacea. PMID: 32761824 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • This is odd to me that a 2020 article is discussing a 'Cross-sectional study of Finnish adults aged 70 to 93 as part of the Norther Finland Cohort 1966 Study.'' Why not examine adults the same age today?
    • In the spirit of posting 'everything rosacea' the RRDi is announcing this 'natural' treatment which the official website states, "Grahams Natural Rosacea Cream is a natural formula which includes clinically tested ingredients to reduce redness. Designed to reduce inflammation and soothe sensitive skin, our rosacea cream will hydrate and calm the skin." It is made in Australia and here are the ingredients: Water Purified, Medium-chain Triglycerides, Cetostearyl Alcohol, Simmondsia chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Coconut Oil, Macrogol Cetostearyl Ether / Polyoxyl 20 Cetostearyl Ether, Tocopherol, Gluconolactone, Niacinamide, Taurine, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Monocaprylate, Ethyl Ascorbic Acid, Retinyl Palmitate, Lactic Acid. If you have used this treatment please find the green reply button and post your experience. 
    • Related ArticlesThe High Prevalence of Skin Diseases in Adults Aged 70 and Older. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2020 Aug 04;: Authors: Sinikumpu SP, Jokelainen J, Haarala AK, Keränen MH, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Huilaja L Abstract BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of skin findings and skin diseases in adults aged 70 and older, and to study the association between cutaneous diseases and socioeconomic status (SES), sex, and living status in the older population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of Finnish adults aged 70 to 93 as part of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study. SETTINGS: Skin examination data were available for 552 adults. MEASUREMENTS: A whole-body skin examination was performed by dermatologists. The associations between skin diseases and SES, sex, and living status were analyzed. RESULTS: Nearly 80% of the adults had at least one skin disease that required further treatment or follow-up. More than one-third of the study cases (39.1%) had three or more simultaneous skin diseases. Skin diseases were more common in men than in women (P < .001). The most common skin diseases were tinea pedis (48.6%), onychomycosis (29.9%), rosacea (25.6%), actinic keratosis (22.3%), and asteatotic eczema (20.8%). Some association was found between skin diseases and SES and living status. CONCLUSION: A whole-body clinical skin examination is important because it reveals important diagnoses. PMID: 32754902 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesFrequency of different types of facial melanoses referring to the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital in 2019, and assessment of their effect on health-related quality of life. BMC Dermatol. 2020 Aug 03;20(1):4 Authors: Amatya B, Jha AK, Shrestha S Abstract BACKGROUND: Abnormalities of facial pigmentation, or facial melanoses, are a common presenting complaint in Nepal and are the result of a diverse range of conditions. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, underlying cause and impact on quality of life of facial pigmentary disorders among patients visiting the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital (NMCTH) over the course of one year. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, NMCTH. We recruited patients with facial melanoses above 16 years of age who presented to the outpatient department. Clinical and demographic data were collected and all the enrolled participants completed the validated Nepali version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). RESULTS: Between January 5, 2019 to January 4, 2020, a total of 485 patients were recruited in the study. The most common diagnoses were melasma (166 patients) and post acne hyperpigmentation (71 patients). Quality of life impairment was highest in patients having melasma with steroid induced rosacea-like dermatitis (DLQI = 13.54 ± 1.30), while it was lowest in participants with ephelides (2.45 ± 1.23). CONCLUSION: Facial melanoses are a common presenting complaint and lead to substantial impacts on quality of life. Accurate diagnosis and management can prevent or treat many facial melanoses, including those that lead to substantial loss of quality of life, such as melasma with steroid induced rosacea-like dermatitis. Health care systems in low and middle-income countries should dedicate resources to the identification, prevention and treatment of these conditions to improve quality of life. PMID: 32746823 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
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