Jump to content
  • phenotypes.png
    (1) Flushing
    (2) Persistent Erythema
    (3) Telangiectasia
    (4) Papulopustular
    (Papules/pustules Lesion Counts)
    (5) Phymatous
    (6) Ocular Manifestations

    The RRDi endorsed the phenotype classification of rosacea in November 2016.  Galderma acknowledged the phenotype classification about a year later. In November 2017 the NRS has now moved forward with classifying rosacea into phenotypes with its own published paper. [1] Read about phenotype updates of medical authorities and rosacea organizations that have recognized this superior classification of rosacea

    For over fourteen years, rosacea was classified as subtypes, which has been controversial from the beginning. A new direction has emerged in the diagnosis and classification of rosacea which is superior to the subtype classification because the phenotype uses a "a symptom-oriented therapy approach."  

    "Because rosacea can encompass a multitude of possible combinations of signs and symptoms, the following updated classification system is based on phenotypes—observable characteristics that can result from genetic and/or environmental influences—to provide the necessary means of assessing and treating rosacea in a manner that is consistent with each individual patient's experience. The phenotypes and diagnostic criteria are largely in agreement with those recommended by the global rosacea consensus panel in 2016, and at least 1 diagnostic or 2 major phenotypes are required for the diagnosis of rosacea.' [1]

    For more information read the article by the ROSCO panel: 

    ROSCO Panel Recommends New Approach on Rosacea Diagnosis by Phenotype

    Phenotype Questions

    Phenotype Classification - How does it work? Answer.

    Why is the phenotype classification superior to the subtype classification?  Answer

    What distinguishes the phenotype classification from the subtype classification? Answer.

    Applying the Phenotype Approach for Rosacea to Practice and Research

    In the British Journal of Dermatology, May 25, 2018, it states, “Rosacea diagnosis and classification have evolved since the 2002 National Rosacea Society (NRS) expert panel subtype approach. Several working groups are now aligned to a more patient-centric phenotype approach, based on an individual's presenting signs and symptoms. However, subtyping is still commonplace across the field and an integrated approach is required to ensure widespread progression to the phenotype approach." The article concludes:

    These practical recommendations are intended to indicate the next steps in the progression from subtyping to a phenotyping approach in rosacea, with the goals of improving our understanding of the disease, facilitating treatment developments, and ultimately improving care for patients with rosacea.” [2]

    Subtype Classification Inferior to Phenotype Classification
    "Almost a decade and a half has elapsed since the initial proposition of criteria for rosacea diagnosis and grouping into common presentations or subtypes. Reappraisal of these items suggests shortcomings in case-finding and diagnostic accuracy that require revision to facilitate rather than undermine future investigation. Subtyping of rosacea, a post-hoc means of grouping more common presentations, can be and has been subverted inappropriately to imply strict categories without adequate consideration of the varying phenotypic presentation of individuals and the potential for temporal variation. Scales for rosacea severity are also confounded by similar multidimensional aspects represented in subtyping. In clinical investigation, this can interfere with study of the course of singular features of rosacea and their measurement." [3]

    End Notes
    [1] Standard classification and pathophysiology of rosacea: The 2017 update by the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee

    [2] Applying the phenotype approach for rosacea to practice and research.
    Br J Dermatol. 2018 May 25;
    Tan J, Berg M, Gallo RL, Del Rosso JQ

    [3]  Shortcomings in rosacea diagnosis and classification

  • Posts

    • As a medical assistant for a dermatologist I worry about the added fragrance in the baby shampoo causing further irritation. 
    • I work as a medical assistant for a dermatologist. I definitely think it is a possibility for rosacea to through periods of remissions and flare-ups. This can be due to environmental factors as well as psychological factors. 
    • Related Articles Symptomatic vulvar demodicosis: A case report and review of the literature. J Cutan Pathol. 2020 Nov;47(11):1063-1066 Authors: Hedberg ML, Chibnall RJ, Compton LA Abstract Demodex folliculorum is a mite that commonly inhabits the pilosebaceous units of facial skin, particularly in a perioral and periorbital distribution. While typically an incidental and asymptomatic parasite, Demodex spp. are proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of facial folliculitis, chronic blepharitis and papulopustular rosacea. Reports of demodicosis in anatomic locations other than the face are exceedingly rare. Here we report a 36-year-old woman with symptomatic Demodex spp. infestation of Fordyce spots of the labia minora. She was referred to dermatology after a 9-month history of tender red bumps on the vulva that would arise and drain over a 24 to 72 hours period, several times per week. Physical examination revealed erythema of the labia minora and introitus with a 4 mm, pink, dome-shaped soft papule on the left labium minus. Wet mount, microbiologic cultures and sexually transmitted infection (STI) screenings were unremarkable. Histopathologic examination revealed a well-circumscribed nodule of suppurative granulomatous inflammation arising in a background of mucosa with Fordyce spots, the majority of which were infiltrated by Demodex spp. Treatment with oral ivermectin and topical metronidazole cream resulted in a symptom-free period of 22 months. This case represents an unusual presentation of symptomatic Demodex infestation. PMID: 33448447 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article More information on oral ivermectin
    • This question has come up at RF whether Finasteride or Minoxidil causes flushing or may be a rosacea trigger and you may be interested in knowing that apparently there isn't any consensus on this and these two drugs haven't been listed on any rosacea trigger list as far as we know. If you have anything to add to this or your experience using either of these treatments with your rosacea, please find the reply to topic button.  For more information 
    • Related ArticlesResolution of Refractory Corneal Neovascularization with Subconjunctival Bevacizumab. Case Rep Ophthalmol. 2020 Sep-Dec;11(3):652-657 Authors: Britton AK, Crayford BB Abstract Corneal neovascularization (CNV) has a variety of causes and threatens corneal clarity, thus optimal visual acuity. Conventional medical management includes topical steroids and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors like doxycycline. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have demonstrated promise but remain off-label for this indication. However, these agents hold value in cases refractory to first-line medical management. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with ocular rosacea and CNV affecting vision, on a background of acne rosacea. She was initially treated with fluorometholone and doxycycline, yet continued to deteriorate. Eventually she received two 1.5-mg subconjunctival injections of bevacizumab 2 months apart. CNV completely resolved and results were maintained at 4-year follow-up. This case demonstrates that refractory CNV can be effectively treated with subconjunctival injection of anti-VEGF bevacizumab. The resolution of CNV was also maintained years after injection with minimal adjunctive therapy during this period, and to our knowledge there are no other studies reporting a follow-up period of 4 years after treatment. This is a pertinent case for other clinicians treating patients in a similar situation. PMID: 33442379 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
×
×
  • Create New...