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    • This question was asked and I am sharing my answer here as well.   Basically everyone has demodex mites and it has been thought that the mites have some sort of undisclosed symbiotic relationship, i.e., the mites eat sebum which helps the mites and helps the humans keep sebum stasis. One report states, "....Demodex mites were originally perceived to be commensals, having a symbiotic relationship with the human host." - See Jarmuda et al published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology (second article mentioned in this post). While this same report says that 'most human populations' have NOT been sampled for demodex mites the general belief is that demodex are common throughout humanity and pose no problem as a pathogen except in the case of demodectic rosacea as far as known.    A Russian study on the mites says, "Demodex folliculorum shows signs of parasitism, while Demodex folliculorum brevis is a saprophyte."  It is comparable to bacteria which humans have a relationship with, there is good bacteria and bad bacteria. The probiotic bacteria and the pathogen bacteria. The demodex mites usually pose no problem with the vast majority of humans since they are possibly on everyone. Why they become more numerous seems to be of more importance.    For some unknown reason the mites are in higher density in rosacea patients. We don't know if the rosacea cause this increase in mites or does the increase in mites cause the rosacea, the old chicken or egg conundrum? There is evidence that reducing the mite density count improves rosacea.  It is clear that the mites like human skin since they eat sebum.     Maybe the increase of sugar/carbohydrate in the diet increases sebum which in turn increases the mite population, and voila, the inflammation of rosacea?    I don't think all rosacea is demodectic. GUT Rosacea is a different variant, but may be connected or associated.  The list of systemic comorbidities with rosacea keeps growing. The gut microbiome is obviously connected with skin microbiome (see my post on this).  
    • Related Articles Epidemiological features of rosacea in Changsha, China: A population-based, cross-sectional study. J Dermatol. 2020 Mar 24;: Authors: Li J, Wang B, Deng Y, Shi W, Jian D, Liu F, Huang Y, Tang Y, Zhao Z, Huang X, Li J, Xie H Abstract Rosacea is a common chronic skin disorder of unknown etiology. While population prevalence rates range 0.2-22% in Europe and North America, prevalence in China is currently undetermined. We conducted a large population-based case-control study to determine the present epidemiological status of rosacea in China, involving 10 095 participants aged 0-100 years (mean age, 35.5 ± 19.1; 50.5% female). A census of rosacea among 15 communities in Changsha in south central China was conducted with skin examination by board-certified dermatologists. Rosacea was observed in 3.48% (95% confidence interval, 3.13-3.85%) of the study population. Subtype distribution was erythematotelangiectatic in 47.6%, papulopustular in 35.0% and phymatous in 17.4%. Family history was noted in 37.8% and ocular symptoms in 31.3%. Associations with rosacea were observed for melasma, hypertension, hyperthyroidism and breast cancer in females (P < 0.05), and also for hyperthyroidism and peptic ulcers in males (P < 0.05). Our results provide baseline information about epidemiological aspects of rosacea in China. PMID: 32207167 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Yes, because its all about immune system and HCQ does modulate the immune system in various ways and regulate the overactivity of immune system in some conditions. Not only does it work in getting rid of symptoms but it actually works behind the disease cause.
    • The president announced on March 19, 2020 that hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) has been approved by the FDA to treat COVID-19.  Virus has never been ruled out in rosacea.  CNN has a followup report on this.  There is a paper that indicates using Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) to treat rosacea "exerted satisfactory therapeutic effects on erythema and inflammatory lesions of rosacea patients, indicating that it is a promising drug for rosacea in clinical treatment." Duff Man told us about this a while back that it worked for him.  Wouldn't it be incredible if any rosaceans who are treated with hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19 also discovered that their rosacea improves or clears up! Is virus involved in rosacea?  If you do take hydroxycholoroquine and your rosacea improves, please let us know.
    • Related Articles Rosacea is Characterized by a Profoundly Diminished Skin Barrier. J Invest Dermatol. 2020 Mar 18;: Authors: Medgyesi B, Dajnoki Z, Béke G, Gáspár K, Szabó IL, Janka EA, Póliska S, Hendrik Z, Méhes G, Törőcsik D, Bíró T, Kapitány A, Szegedi A Abstract Rosacea is a common, chronic inflammation of sebaceous gland-rich facial skin characterized by severe skin dryness, elevated pH, transepidermal water loss, and decreased hydration levels. Until now, there has been no thorough molecular analysis of permeability barrier alterations in the skin of rosacea patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the barrier alterations in papulopustular rosacea (PPR) samples compared to healthy sebaceous gland-rich (SGR) skin, using RNASeq analysis (n=8). Pathway analyses by Cytoscape ClueGo revealed 15 significantly enriched pathways related to skin barrier formation. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to validate the pathway analyses. The results showed significant alterations in barrier components in PPR samples compared to SGR, including the cornified envelope and intercellular lipid lamellae formation, desmosome and tight junction organizations, barrier alarmins, and antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, the barrier damage in PPR was unexpectedly similar to atopic dermatitis (AD); this similarity was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. In summary, besides the well-known dysregulation of immunological, vascular, and neurological functions, we demonstrated prominent permeability barrier alterations in PPR at the molecular level, which highlight the importance of barrier repair therapies for rosacea. PMID: 32199994 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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