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    Transparency

    A fundamental principle in our charter states, "Sources of funding to the institute will be publicized including the name of the donor unless the donor requests anonymity. Expenses of the institute will be publicized down to the last cent, showing where all the spending went and for what purpose." So transparency (behavior) is at the core of our charter. 

    All funding expenses and donations will be reported on this page including exactly what was spent on each item, line by line. The names of all donors and the amount donated will be included, unless the donor requests anonymity. To make a donation click here.
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    The RRDi reports all financial statements so that you can see where the money is coming from and where it is going. What other non profit organization for rosacea does this? Can you find all the financial reports for a non profit organization for rosacea from the time of its inception to the most recent report? We believe in transparency. From 2004 thru 2013 we went the extra mile and filed Form 990 Schedule A and Form EZ. However, since we receive donations less than $50,000 we are only required to fill out Form 990N. So from 2014 we file only Form 990N and include a Google Doc Spreadsheet of our financial report which you can review below. 

    Financial Reports

    Spreadsheet
    Form 990 N
    Year
    Form 990 Schedule A
    Form 990 EZ
    Financial Report 2017 2017 2017    
    Financial Report 2016 2016 2016    
    Financial Report 2015 2015 2015    
    Financial Report 2014 2014 2014    
    2013
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2012 Form 990 EZ
    2012
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2012 Form 990 EZ
    2011
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2011 Form 990 EZ
     
    2010
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2010 Form 990 EZ
    2009
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2009 Form 990 EZ
     
    2008
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2008 Form 990 EZ
    2007
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2007 Form 990 EZ
     
    2006
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2006 Form 990 EZ
     
    2005
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2005 Form 990 EZ
     
    2004
    2004 Form 990 EZ
    2004 Form 990 EZ
  • Posts

    • Prevalence of gastrointestinal comorbidities in rosacea: Comparison of subantimicrobial, modified release doxycycline versus conventional release doxycycline. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Feb;78(2):417-419 Authors: Lim HG, Fischer A, Rueda MJ, Kendall J, Kang S, Chien AL PMID: 29332715 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • crawfish18 (at RF) reports mixing zinc oxide 20% and Sulfur 10% in a 50/50% mix which crawfish18 says works for rosacea. 
    • Related Articles Inate immunity in rosacea. Langerhans cells, plasmacytoid dentritic cells, Toll-like receptors and inducible oxide nitric synthase (iNOS) expression in skin specimens: case-control study. Arch Dermatol Res. 2018 Jan 12;: Authors: Moura AKA, Guedes F, Rivitti-Machado MC, Sotto MN Abstract
      Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition with predominant facial involvement. Because of that, many patients sense that rosacea affects quality of life. The etiology of rosacea remains unknown. Recent studies have suggested that aberrant innate immunity is central to this disease. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of Langerhans cells, plasmacytoid dentritic cells (PDC), the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR) and inducible oxide nitric synthase (iNOS) in skin of patients with rosacea, to highlight the participation of innate immunity in its pathogenesis. 28 biopsy specimens were taken from patients with clinical and histopathological findings of rosacea. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Langerhans cells (anti-CD1a antibody), PDC (anti-CD 123 antibody), TLR2, TLR4 and iNOS was performed in skin samples and compared with normal skin controls. The expression of Langerhans cells was lower in rosacea group than in control group. PDC were found in skin samples of rosacea as isolated cells and forming small clusters. Expression of TLR2, TLR4 and iNOS was higher in rosacea samples than in normal skin controls. This research demonstrates early and late stage components of innate immunity in specimens of rosacea ratifying the existence of an altered innate immunity in its pathogenesis.
      PMID: 29330632 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Pivotal Trial of the Efficacy and Safety of Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for the Treatment of Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Findings from the First REVEAL Trial. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Jan 01;17(1):97-105 Authors: Kircik LH, DuBois J, Draelos ZD, Werschler P, Grande K, Cook-Bolden FE, Weng E, Berk DR, Ahluwalia G Abstract
      An unmet need exists for a safe, tolerable, effective treatment for moderate to severe persistent facial erythema in patients with rosacea. This pivotal phase 3, multicenter, double-blind study evaluated the efficacy and safety of topical oxymetazoline in patients with facial erythema associated with moderate to severe rosacea. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with oxymetazoline hydrochloride cream 1.0% or vehicle applied once daily for 29 days, and were followed for 28 days posttreatment. The primary efficacy outcome was having at least a 2-grade decrease from baseline on both the Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) and the Subject Self-Assessment for rosacea facial redness (SSA) scales (composite success) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose on day 29. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and posttreatment worsening of erythema (composite CEA/SSA increase of 1-grade severity from baseline; rebound effect). A total of 440 patients (mean age, 49.5 years; 78.9% females) were randomized (oxymetazoline, n=222; vehicle, n=218); most had moderate erythema. On day 29, significantly greater proportions of oxymetazoline recipients achieved the primary efficacy outcome at each time point (P less than 0.02) and overall (P less than 0.001) compared with vehicle recipients. The incidence of discontinuation due to TEAEs was low in both groups (oxymetazoline group, 1.8%; vehicle group, 0.5%). The most common TEAEs reported during the entire study period were application-site dermatitis, application-site erythema, and headache in the oxymetazoline group (1.4% each), and headache (0.9%) in the vehicle group. Following cessation of treatment, low proportions of patients experienced rebound effect (oxymetazoline group, 2.2%; vehicle group, 1.1%). Oxymetazoline applied to the face once daily for 29 days was effective, safe, and well tolerated in patients with moderate to severe persistent facial erythema of rosacea. <p><em>J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(1):97-105.</em></p>.
      PMID: 29320594 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Patients' self-esteem before and after chemical peeling procedure. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2017 Dec 29;:1-3 Authors: Anargyros K, Eftychia P, Christos C, Vasiliki E, Vasiliki M, Kaliopi A, Irene P, Dimitrios R, George K Abstract
      INTRODUCTION: Chemical peeling is a safe method, widely used to treat a variety of skin conditions and reduce the aging effects. This study aims to evaluate self-esteem among adolescents who undergo chemical peelings.
      MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty six patients constituted the study group. Sixty seven individuals had undergone chemical peeling for therapeutic reasons and 59 individuals for cosmetic reasons. To assess patients' self-esteem, the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) was used before and after treatment. The control group included 71 healthy, age- and sex-matched volunteers from the general population. They were also asked to complete the RSES, after the same time interval as the patients.
      RESULTS: The healthy controls (23.01 ± 3.12) presented statistically significantly higher self-esteem than both the groups of individuals who would be submitted to chemical peeling. Furthermore, patients who would undergo peeling for therapeutic reasons (21.58 ± 3.20) had statistically significantly higher self-esteem than those who would undergo the procedure for cosmetic reasons (18.97 ± 3.36). After the chemical peeling sessions, the self-esteem of patients treated for therapeutic reasons (23.48 ± 2.43) and of patients treated for cosmetic reasons (22.83 ± 3.34) improved statistically significantly, while the self-esteem of the healthy controls remained stable, as expected.
      CONCLUSION: Patients who undergo chemical peelings tend to have low levels of self-esteem. Although facial lesions in skin diseases such as acne, acne scars, rosacea, and melasma seem to have negative effect on individuals' self-consciousness, patients who would be submitted to chemical peeling in order to treat wrinkles, loss of radiance, and skin tone clarity have even lower self-esteem. Chemical peelings were shown to favorably affect patient's self-esteem since all patients showed an increase in self-esteem after treatment, while the control group experienced no change.
      PMID: 29286838 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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