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    All the board members have been diagnosed with rosacea and are volunteers who are available to answer your questions or listen to your concerns in the Member Forum for members if you join with just an email address to post. One board member has a master of science biotechnology.

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    Johannes Schild [Director, Board Member]                                                                    
    Spanish Fort, Alabama, USA
    Schild Investments, LLC
    Marine Consultancy, LLC
    Johannes_Schild_Resumé.pdf
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    Pam Tobey [Secretary, Board Member]                                                                                       
    Arlington, Virginia, USA
    Retired, Washington Post, News Information Designer
    Visuals Director at the Beijing Review Magazine
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    Brady Barrows [Treasurer, Board Member]                                         
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Founder
    About
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    Apurva Tathe [Assistant Director, Board Member]                                                                            
    Bhilai, India
    Master of Science Biotechnology 
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  • Posts

    • Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2021 Jul 23. doi: 10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.229. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) are considered important plant-food allergens in the Mediterranean area, but little is known about LTP allergy in pediatric age. Our aim was to characterize LTP allergy in children.We reviewed the clinical data from all children evaluated in our department with LTP allergy. From the 76 patients with LTP allergy, 26 children were included, 50% female, median age 10 years (1-17). Symptoms included urticaria in 58% (n = 15), 168 anaphylaxes in 46% (n = 12) and OAS in 42% (n = 11). Multiple reactions with different foods occurred in 69%. Cofactors were reported in 27% (n = 7). All patients had positive SPT to peach LTP extract and sIgE Pru p 3. No association between the occurrence of severe reactions and sIgE to Pru p 3 (p = 0.462), sIgE to Cor a 8 (p = 0.896), SPT to peach LTP extraxt (p = 0.846) or the number of positive SPT to fruits/tree nuts (p = 0.972; p = 0.676) was found. Ninety-two percent of the patients tolerated fruits from Rosacea family without peel. Twelve percent reported reactions to new LTP containing foods during follow-up. LTP allergy can occur since early childhood. Since anaphylaxis is common and cofactors act as severity enhancers, it is fundamental to recognize LTP allergy in children. Currently available diagnostic tests (SPT and sIgE) cannot accurately predict food tolerance or anticipate reaction severity. PMID:34296844 | DOI:10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.229 {url} = URL to article
    • J Dermatolog Treat. 2021 Jul 22:1-8. doi: 10.1080/09546634.2021.1959507. Online ahead of print. NO ABSTRACT PMID:34291712 | DOI:10.1080/09546634.2021.1959507 {url} = URL to article
    • Front Immunol. 2021 Jul 5;12:674871. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2021.674871. eCollection 2021. ABSTRACT Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory condition that mainly affects the central face. However, the molecular background of the normal central face and the transcriptional profiling and immune cell composition of rosacea lesions remain largely unknown. Here, we performed whole-skin and epidermal RNA-seq of central facial skin from healthy individuals, lesions and matched normal skin from rosacea patients. From whole-skin RNA-seq, the site-specific gene signatures for central facial skin were mainly enriched in epithelial cell differentiation, with upregulation of the activator protein-1 (AP1) transcription factor (TF). We identified the common upregulated inflammatory signatures and diminished keratinization signature for rosacea lesions. Gene ontology, pathway, TF enrichment and immunohistochemistry results suggested that STAT1 was the potential core of the critical TF networks connecting the epithelial-immune crosstalk in rosacea lesions. Epidermal RNA-seq and immunohistochemistry analysis further validated the epithelial-derived STAT1 signature in rosacea lesions. The epidermal STAT1/IRF1 signature was observed across ETR, PPR, and PhR subtypes. Immune cell composition revealed that macrophages were common in all 3 subtypes. Finally, we described subtype-specific gene signatures and immune cell composition correlated with phenotypes. These findings reveal the specific epithelial differentiation in normal central facial skin, and epithelial-immune crosstalk in lesions providing insight into an initial keratinocyte pattern in the pathogenesis of rosacea. PMID:34290700 | PMC:PMC8287635 | DOI:10.3389/fimmu.2021.674871 {url} = URL to article
    • Med Res Rev. 2021 Jul 21. doi: 10.1002/med.21842. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT The sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin from Artemisia annua L. is well established for malaria therapy, but its bioactivity spectrum is much broader. In this review, we give a comprehensive and timely overview of the literature regarding the immunosuppressive activity of artemisinin-type compounds toward inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Numerous receptor-coupled signaling pathways are inhibited by artemisinins, including the receptors for interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), β3-integrin, or RANKL, toll-like receptors and growth factor receptors. Among the receptor-coupled signal transducers are extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT serine/threonine kinase (AKT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK), phospholipase C γ1 (PLCγ), and others. All these receptors and signal transduction molecules are known to contribute to the inhibition of the transcription factor nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB). Artemisinins may inhibit NF-κB by silencing these upstream pathways and/or by direct binding to NF-κB. Numerous NF-κB-regulated downstream genes are downregulated by artemisinin and its derivatives, for example, cytokines, chemokines, and immune receptors, which regulate immune cell differentiation, apoptosis genes, proliferation-regulating genes, signal transducers, and genes involved in antioxidant stress response. In addition to the prominent role of NF-κB, other transcription factors are also inhibited by artemisinins (mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR], activating protein 1 [AP1]/FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homologue [FOS]/JUN oncogenic transcription factor [JUN]), hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF-1α), nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NF-ATC1), Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), NF E2-related factor-2 (NRF-2), retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (ROR-γt), and forkhead box P-3 (FOXP-3). Many in vivo experiments in disease-relevant animal models demonstrate therapeutic efficacy of artemisinin-type drugs against rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus erythematosus, arthrosis, and gout), lung diseases (asthma, acute lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis), neurological diseases (autoimmune encephalitis, Alzheimer's disease, and myasthenia gravis), skin diseases (dermatitis, rosacea, and psoriasis), inflammatory bowel disease, and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Randomized clinical trials should be conducted in the future to translate the plethora of preclinical results into clinical practice. PMID:34288018 | DOI:10.1002/med.21842 {url} = URL to article
    • An Bras Dermatol. 2021 Jul 15:S0365-0596(21)00173-2. doi: 10.1016/j.abd.2021.02.004. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The frequency of autoimmune diseases and thyroid cancer has been increasingly reported in association with rosacea. However, studies investigating thyroid diseases in rosacea are scarce with conflicting results. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between thyroid disorders and rosacea. METHODS: A large case-control study on age- and gender-matched 2091 rosacea patients and 9572 controls was conducted. Rosacea patients using the rosacea-specific ICD codes were compiled from the hospital records. Additionally, all participants were evaluated in terms of the presence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to compute case-control odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The analysis comprehended 2091 rosacea patients (1546 female, 545 male; mean 48.73 ± 14.53 years) and 9572 controls (7009 female, 2563 male; mean 48.73 ± 15.1 years). Whereas the rate of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in rosacea patients (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.13-1.49, p < 0.001), there was no significant difference in the rate of hyperthyroidism between the groups (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.81-1.53, p = 0.497). Stratification for genderrevealed a significant association between hypothyroidism and rosacea in females (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.1-1.47, p = 0.002) and males (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.04-2.4, p = 0.032). The frequency of hypothyroidism in rosacea patients increased towards the age range of 40-49 and then decreased, parallel with the hypothyroidism frequency of the study population. STUDY LIMITATIONS: Different subtypes and severities of rosacea were not distinguished. CONCLUSIONS: Hypothyroidism may be a comorbidity of rosacea and investigation for hypothyroidism may be appropriate when evaluating rosacea patients. PMID:34275693 | DOI:10.1016/j.abd.2021.02.004 {url} = URL to article
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