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  1. Rosacea and alcohol intake. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Nov 07;: Authors: Drago F, Ciccarese G, Herzum A, Rebora A, Parodi A PMID: 29126626 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  2. Related Articles Rhinophyma graft for repair of the phymatous nasal ala. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 04;76(4):e123 Authors: Malone CH, DeCrescenzo AJ, Subrt AP, Wagner RF PMID: 28325413 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
  3. Related Articles Rhinophyma graft for repair of the phymatous nasal ala. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 04;76(4):e123 Authors: Malone CH, DeCrescenzo AJ, Subrt AP, Wagner RF PMID: 28325413 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
  4. Related Articles Topical a-Agonist Therapy for Persistent Facial Erythema of Rosacea and the Addition of Oxmetazoline to the Treatment Armamentarium: Where Are We Now? J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2017 Jul;10(7):28-32 Authors: Del Rosso JQ Abstract The presence of vasoactivity in rosacea-affected skin led to the development of two topical α-adrenergic receptor agonists, brimonidine tartrate 0.5% gel and oxymetazoline hydrochloride 1% cream, both approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of persistent facial erythema of rosacea. In this article, the author discusses challenges related to the treatment of persistent facial erythema of rosacea and the use of a-agonist therapy. The author also discusses cases of worsening of facial erythema after the application of brimonidine, as well as briefly reviews recently reported clinical data on oxymetazoline. Finally, the author attempts to differentiate some potential mechanistic differences between these two agents. PMID: 29104721 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
  5. Comorbidities in rosacea: A systematic review and update. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Oct 26;: Authors: Haber R, El Gemayel M Abstract BACKGROUND: Rosacea is linked to abnormalities of cutaneous vasculature and dysregulation of the inflammatory response. Recent reports on rosacea have shown a significant association with cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and psychiatric diseases, all of which may affect morbidity and mortality among these patients. OBJECTIVE: To review available data regarding comorbidities associated with rosacea, discuss their pathogenesis, and highlight the evaluation of affected patients. METHODS: We performed a complete and systematic literature review in PubMed/Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaboration databases, searching for all articles on possible associated diseases that have been reported with rosacea, with no limits on publication date, participant age, sex, or nationality. RESULTS: A total of 29 studies were included in this systematic review, including 14 case-control, 8 cross-sectional, and 7 cohort studies. Statistically significant association with rosacea has been mostly demonstrated with depression (n = 117,848 patients), hypertension (n = 18,176), cardiovascular diseases (n = 9739), anxiety disorder (n = 9079), dyslipidemia (n = 7004), diabetes mellitus (n = 6306), migraine (n = 6136), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 4192), Helicobacter pylori infection (n = 1722), ulcerative colitis (n = 1424), and dementia (n = 1194). LIMITATIONS: Limitations included the accuracy of the published data, potential patient selection, and possible confounding factors. The true nature of the drawn correlations is uncertain, and causality cannot be established. CONCLUSIONS: Rosacea is associated with a number of systemic disorders. Recognition of these conditions is critical to providing appropriate screening and management of affected patients. PMID: 29107339 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  6. Rosacea comorbidities and future research: The 2017 update by the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Nov 01;: Authors: Gallo RL, Granstein RD, Kang S, Mannis M, Steinhoff M, Tan J, Thiboutot D PMID: 29102687 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  7. Role of Topical Oxymetazoline for Management of Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea. Ann Pharmacother. 2017 Nov 01;:1060028017740139 Authors: Hoover RM, Erramouspe J Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review and summarize topical oxymetazoline's pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, cost, and place in therapy for persistent redness associated with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. DATA SOURCES: Literature searches of MEDLINE (1975 to September 2017), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1975 to September 2017), and Cochrane Database (publications through September 2017) using the terms rosacea, persistent redness, α -agonist, and oxymetazoline. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Results were limited to studies of human subjects, English-language publications, and topical use of oxymetazoline. Relevant materials from government sources, industry, and reviews were also included. DATA SYNTHESIS: Data support the efficacy of oxymetazoline for persistent facial redness. Little study beyond clinical trials cited in the drug approval process has been conducted. Current data suggest that oxymetazoline is similar in safety and efficacy to brimonidine. Head-to-head comparisons of topical α-agonists for erythema caused by rosacea are needed. CONCLUSION: The topical α-agonist, oxymetazoline, is safe and effective for reducing persistent facial redness associated with erythematotelangiectatic subtype of rosacea. Health care practitioners selecting among treatments should consider not only the subtype of rosacea but also individual patient response, preference, and cost. PMID: 29094614 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  8. Related Articles Standard classification and pathophysiology of rosacea: The 2017 update by the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Oct 28;: Authors: Gallo RL, Granstein RD, Kang S, Mannis M, Steinhoff M, Tan J, Thiboutot D Abstract In 2002, the National Rosacea Society assembled an expert committee to develop the first standard classification of rosacea. This original classification was intended to be updated as scientific knowledge and clinical experience increased. Over the last 15 years, significant new insights into rosacea's pathogenesis and pathophysiology have emerged, and the disorder is now widely addressed in clinical practice. Growing knowledge of rosacea's pathophysiology has established that a consistent multivariate disease process underlies the various clinical manifestations of this disorder, and the clinical significance of each of these elements is increasing as more is understood. This review proposes an updated standard classification of rosacea that is based on phenotypes linked to our increased understanding of disease pathophysiology. This updated classification is intended to provide clearer parameters to conduct investigations, guide diagnosis, and improve treatment. PMID: 29089180 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  9. Related Articles Evidence-based update on rosacea comorbidities and their common physiologic pathways. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Oct 28;: Authors: Holmes AD, Spoendlin J, Chien AL, Baldwin H, Chang ALS Abstract Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory disease affecting the facial skin whose etiology and pathophysiology are the subject of much investigation. Risk factors include genetic and environmental elements that may predispose individuals to localized inflammation and abnormal neurovascular responses to stimuli. Recent studies have introduced an array of systemic rosacea comorbidities, such as inflammatory bowel disease and neurologic conditions, that can be challenging to synthesize. We critically review the current data behind reported rosacea comorbidities and identify and highlight underrecognized physiologic mediators shared among rosacea and associated comorbidities. This information may be helpful in addressing patient questions about potential systemic implications of rosacea and can serve as a candidate platform for future research to understand rosacea and improve treatments. PMID: 29089181 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
  10. Related Articles Severe Rosacea: A Case Report. J Ophthalmic Vis Res. 2017 Oct-Dec;12(4):429-433 Authors: Shirzadeh E, Bagheri A, Abdizadeh MF, Kanavi MR Abstract PURPOSE: To describe a case of severe rosacea with ocular involvement. CASE REPORT: A 28-year-old female patient presented with extensive facial and ocular eruptions. She had a history of treatment with oral prednisolone due to the clinical diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE), which had resulted in transient improvement of the lesions, but was followed by exacerbation of the lesions. With the clinical diagnosis of severe oculofacial rosacea, she was successfully treated with oral doxycycline, steroid eye drops, and ocular lubricants. Histopathological features of skin biopsy were consistent with rosacea in the context of infection with Demodexfolliculorum. After four years, a relapse of the oculofacial lesions occurred, for which retreatment with oral tetracycline, steroid eye drops, and ocular lubricants was administered. CONCLUSION: Rosacea can be extremely severe and disfiguring, and it can be misdiagnosed as the pathognomonic butterfly rash of LE. Demodex carriage in rosacea is consistent and may play a significant role in the severe forms. PMID: 29090055 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
  11. Real-World Efficacy of Azelaic Acid 15% Gel for the Reduction of Inflammatory Lesions of Rosacea. Skin Therapy Lett. 2017 11;22(6):5-7 Authors: Wirth PJ, Henderson Berg MH, Sadick N Abstract Approximately 16 million Americans have rosacea, an inflammatory cutaneous disorder with central facial erythema, papules, pustules, telangiectasia, flushing, and swelling being among the more commonly recognized features. Overexpression of cathelicidin peptide LL-37 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of rosacea. Azelaic acid has been found to inhibit the pathologic expression of cathelicidin, as well as the hyperactive protease activity that cleaves cathelicidin into LL-37. Given these findings, a small prospective, open-label, interventional trial was undertaken to assess the effects of azelaic acid 15% gel on inflammatory lesions of papulopustular rosacea in a real-world setting. Use of azelaic acid was associated with a significant reduction in inflammatory lesions, which persisted beyond the active treatment phase. Overall, azelaic acid 15% gel is an appropriate initial topical therapy for the treatment of moderate facial rosacea. PMID: 29091380 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
  12. PubMed RSS Feed - -Rosacea.

    Rosacea. N Engl J Med. 2017 Nov 02;377(18):1754-1764 Authors: van Zuuren EJ PMID: 29091565 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
  13. Inhibition of Human Kallikrein 5 Protease by Triterpenoids from Natural Sources. Molecules. 2017 Oct 27;22(11): Authors: Matsubara Y, Matsumoto T, Koseki J, Kaneko A, Aiba S, Yamasaki K Abstract Stratum corneum tryptic enzyme kallikrein 5 (KLK5) is a serine protease that is involved in the cell renewal and maintenance of the skin barrier function. The excessive activation of KLK5 causes an exacerbation of dermatoses, such as rosacea and atopic dermatitis. Some triterpenoids are reported to suppress the serine proteases. We aimed to investigate whether bioactive triterpenoids modulate the KLK5 protease. Nineteen triterpenoids occurring in medicinal crude drugs were evaluated using an enzymatic assay to measure the anti-KLK5 activity. The KLK5-dependent cathelicidin peptide LL-37 production in human keratinocytes was examined using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Screening assays for evaluating the anti-KLK5 activity revealed that ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, saikosaponin b₁, tumulosic acid and pachymic acid suppressed the KLK5 protease activity, although critical molecular moieties contributing to anti-KLK5 activity were unclarified. Ursolic acid and tumulosic acid suppressed the proteolytic processing of LL-37 in keratinocytes at ≤10 μM; no cytotoxicity was observed. Both triterpenoids were detected in the plasma of rats administered orally with triterpenoid-rich crude drug Jumihaidokuto. Our study reveals that triterpenoids, such as ursolic acid and tumulosic acid, modulate the KLK5 protease activity and cathelicidin peptide production. Triterpenoids may affect the skin barrier function via the regulation of proteases. PMID: 29077044 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
  14. Related Articles Development of Ocular Rosacea following Combined Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Treatment for Metastatic Malignant Skin Melanoma. Ocul Oncol Pathol. 2017 Sep;3(3):188-192 Authors: Brouwer NJ, Haanen JBAG, Jager MJ Abstract PURPOSE: To report a case of severe ocular rosacea following ipilimumab plus nivolumab treatment in a patient with metastatic malignant skin melanoma. METHODS: Case report and review of the literature. RESULTS: A 68-year-old male with newly diagnosed metastatic malignant cutaneous melanoma was treated with first-line ipilimumab plus nivolumab, which resulted in a partial response. Four months after initiation of treatment, the patient developed red eyelids and conjunctivae, with painful gritty eyes, limiting his capacity to read. Following a diagnosis of severe ocular rosacea and dry eyes, treatment including corticosteroids, antimicrobial agents, and eyelid hygiene was started, and within 3 months, the ocular complaints resolved. CONCLUSION: Treatment with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma may trigger several ocular immune-related adverse events. This case describes severe ocular rosacea as an adverse event following ipilimumab plus nivolumab treatment. PMID: 29071268 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
  15. Related Articles Uncaria tomentosa. G Ital Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Dec;152(6):651-657 Authors: Della Valle V Abstract Uncaria tomentosa (U. tomentosa) or uña de gato, a species of vine of Rubiaceae family, was used from centuries in various medical conditions. Although there are no randomized controlled trials or published human outcome studies, some conditions reportedly improved by U. tomentosa include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, prostatitis, viral illnesses and cancer (acting as a non-specific immunomodulantign agent) and it may also have potential as an immunomodulating adaptogen in cellular aging. The understanding of some specific mechanisms of molecular action leads to the demonstration of various anti-inflammatory, immunostimulating and protective effects. These results bring the strong hypothesis that U. tomentosa could be effective in the topical treatment of dermatological manifestation, namely rosacea. PMID: 29050447 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
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