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    We have a Member Forum which you can view and read the posts as a guest. 

    However to post in our state of the art forum you register as a non voting member. Simply provide your email address and create your own display name to join. You may also register with your Facebook, Twitter or Google secure login. 

    However to be a voting member you must join the RRDi and identify yourself when registering with your contact information to be able to vote who sits on the board of directors. You are not required to be a voting member. The RRDi will never reveal your identity to anyone so you can rest assured our privacy policy is solid. You may want to read this post, entitled, Anonymity, Transparency and Posting, look for the subheading, How You Can Remain Anonymous Posting in the RRDi Member Forum. Members can also post articles on rosacea which may be used later for publication either on our web site as a promoted article [see some of our member published articles] or as an article in a future publication of the Journal of the RRDi. There is also a member Blogs Area and member Gallery Area for your use if you join the RRDi. Also, ask about a free G Suite account available if you volunteer with our non profit organization (mention you want to volunteer when you join). We cordially invite you to join whether or not you can volunteer or post in our Member Forum. Increasing our membership shows you care about rosacea sufferers. Membership is free. If you have any questions, contact us. 

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    • Global Epidemiology and Clinical Spectrum of Rosacea, Highlighting Skin of Color: Review and Clinical Practice Experience. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Sep 18;: Authors: Alexis AF, Callender VD, Baldwin HE, Desai SR, Rendon MI, Taylor SC Abstract
      Among individuals with skin of color, rosacea has been reported less frequently than in those with white skin, but it is not a rare disease. In fact, rosacea may be underreported and underdiagnosed in populations with skin of color because of the difficulty of discerning erythema and telangiectasia in dark skin, as well as underestimation of the susceptibility of more highly pigmented skin to dermatologic conditions like rosacea whose triggers include sun exposure. Many people with skin of color who have rosacea may experience delayed diagnosis leading to inappropriate or inadequate treatment, greater morbidity, and uncontrolled, progressive disease with disfiguring manifestations, including phymatous rosacea. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rosacea in skin of color and highlights variations in the clinical presentation of rosacea across the diverse spectrum of patient populations affected. It presents strategies to aid in the timely diagnosis and effective treatment of rosacea in patients with skin of color, with an aim of promoting increased awareness of rosacea in these patients and reducing disparities in the management of their disease.
      PMID: 30240779 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Full Text The four components of this treatment are: (1) Dextran sulfate is an anionic polymer of sulfated glucose [1] Dextran sulfate contains approximately 17% sulfur which is equivalent to approximately 2.3 sulfate groups per glucosyl residue. [2]  (2) 4-t-butylcyclohexanol  [BCH; TRP-regulin ®] [3] (3) pongamia oil [4] (4) hesperidin methyl chalcone [HMC] [5] Some of the products mentioned in the above post, "Avène redness-relief cosmetic products for sensitive skin prone to redness" are:  
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Clean Redness-Relief Refreshing Cleansing Lotion
      Eau Thermale Avène Tolérance Extrême Emulsion
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Calm Soothing Repair Mask
      Eau Thermale Avène Xeracalm A.D Lipid-Replenishing Cleansing Oil
      Eau Thermale Avène Skin Recovery Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Cicalfate Restorative Skin Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Extremely Gentle Cleanser Lotion
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Dermo Cleansing Milk
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Day Redness Relief Soothing SPF 25 Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Fort Relief Concentrate End Notes  [1] Dextran Sulfate, Sodium Salt (CAS 9011-18-1), Santa Cruz Biotechnology [2] Dextran Sulfate, Sigma Aldrich, Millipore Sigma [3] PubChem, Sigma Aldrich, ChemSpider, Paula's Choice, Safety Data Sheet, Effective treatment for sensitive skin: 4-t-butylcyclohexanol and licochalcone A [4] derived from the seeds of the Millettia pinnata tree [5] Paula's Choice, Truth in Aging, Douglas Laboratories, 
    • Effects of dextran sulfate, 4-t-butylcyclohexanol, pongamia oil and hesperidin methyl chalcone on inflammatory and vascular responses implicated in rosacea. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2018;11:421-429 Authors: Hernandez-Pigeon H, Garidou L, Galliano MF, Delga H, Aries MF, Duplan H, Bessou-Touya S, Castex-Rizzi N Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a chronic facial skin disorder characterized by inflammation and vascular abnormalities. The pathophysiology of rosacea involves increased activation of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and cathelicidin LL-37, MMP-9, and KLKs. We evaluated the activity of four compounds (dextran sulfate, 4-t-butylcyclohexanol [BCH; TRP-regulin®], pongamia oil, and hesperidin methyl chalcone [HMC]) on inflammatory and vascular responses implicated in rosacea.
      Materials and methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of dextran sulfate was evaluated on PGE2 production after PMA stimulation of NCTC-2544 keratinocytes, and on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) after proinflammatory stimulation to mimic a rosacea environment. The anti-angiogenic activity of dextran sulfate was measured by analyzing pseudotube formation in co-cultured human microvascular endothelial cells/normal human dermal fibroblasts. HMC modulation of vascular responses and IL-8 cytokine production after SP stimulation was evaluated in human skin explants. We also assessed the effect of BCH on TRPV1 activation, and the effect of combined BCH and pongamia oil on the inflammatory response of NHEKs.
      Results: Dextran sulfate strongly and significantly inhibited PMA-induced PGE2 production, inhibited KLK5 and MMP-9 mRNA expression, and IL-8, IL-1α and VEGF production, and displayed a highly significant inhibitory effect on VEGF-induced pseudotube formation. In SP-stimulated human skin explants, HMC significantly decreased the proportion of dilated vessels, total vessel area, and IL-8 production. BCH significantly and dose-dependently inhibited TRPV1 activation, and BCH and pongamia oil inhibited CXCL1 and CXCL6 mRNA expression and IL-8 production in NHEKs. Combined BCH/pongamia oil inhibited IL-8 production synergistically.
      Conclusion: These in vitro results showed that dextran sulfate, BCH, pongamia oil and HMC, possess complementary soothing and anti-redness properties, supporting their combination in Avène redness-relief cosmetic products for sensitive skin prone to redness, and for topical adjunctive rosacea treatment.
      PMID: 30233225 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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