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    We have a Member Forum which you can view and read the posts as a guest. Guests can post here without registering an account

    However to post in our state of the art forum you register as a non voting member. Simply provide your email address and create your own display name to join. You may also register with your Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, Linkedin or Google secure login. 

    However to be a voting member you must join the RRDi and identify yourself when registering with your contact information to be able to vote who sits on the board of directors. You are not required to be a voting member. The RRDi will never reveal your identity to anyone so you can rest assured our privacy policy is solid. You may want to read this post, entitled, Anonymity, Transparency and Posting, look for the subheading, How You Can Remain Anonymous Posting in the RRDi Member Forum. Members can also post articles on rosacea which may be used later for publication either on our web site as a promoted article [see some of our member published articles] or as an article in a future publication of the Journal of the RRDi. There is also a member Blogs Area and member Gallery Area for your use if you join the RRDi. Also, ask about a free G Suite account available if you volunteer with our non profit organization (mention you want to volunteer when you join). We cordially invite you to join whether or not you can volunteer or post in our Member Forum which is a public forum. Increasing our membership shows you care about rosacea sufferers. Membership is free. Or you may want to join our private Tapatalk Forum. If you have any questions, contact us. 

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    • The RRDi has been using Invision Community forum platform since 2004. When we started in 2004 it was recommended by Warren Stuart who was the assistant director of the RRDi to use what was then called Invision Power Services (later the name was changed to Invision Community). It is a powerful platform with many add-on features and a significant number of developers adding plugins and additional features to the platform. However, with the advent of mobile devices and social media platforms the trend has focused on mobile apps using iOS and Android devices found in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. The popularity of using these apps over using a browser to view a website has increased the use of social media platforms such as Reddit, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. The developers and owners of the Invision Community platform have now announced beta versions of iOS and Android apps for their platform which has been embedded for years using only a web browser, so we have announced with this post here asking for volunteers to download the beta versions and help test these new apps. Please consider volunteering and using these beta versions of the apps.  Invision Community Clients There are some significant clients who use Invision Community as their platform which you can see below:  Medical Clients Who Use Invision Community Platform
    • Amelioration of Compound 48/80-Mediated Itch and LL-37-Induced Inflammation by a Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide. Front Immunol. 2020;11:559589 Authors: Dondalska A, Rönnberg E, Ma H, Pålsson SA, Magnusdottir E, Gao T, Adam L, Lerner EA, Nilsson G, Lagerström M, Spetz AL Abstract Numerous inflammatory skin disorders display a high prevalence of itch. The Mas-related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2) has been shown to modulate itch by inducing non-IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and the release of endogenous inducers of pruritus. Various substances collectively known as basic secretagogues, which include inflammatory peptides and certain drugs, can trigger MRGPRX2 and thereby induce pseudo-allergic reactions characterized by histamine and protease release as well as inflammation. Here, we investigated the capacity of an immunomodulatory single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssON) to modulate IgE-independent mast cell degranulation and, more specifically, its ability to inhibit the basic secretagogues compound 48/80 (C48/80)-and LL-37 in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of ssON on MRGPRX2 activation in vitro by measuring degranulation in a human mast cell line (LAD2) and calcium influx in MRGPRX2-transfected HEK293 cells. To determine the effect of ssON on itch, we performed behavioral studies in established mouse models and collected skin biopsies for histological analysis. Additionally, with the use of a rosacea mouse model and RT-qPCR, we investigated the effect on ssON on LL-37-induced inflammation. We reveal that both mast cell degranulation and calcium influx in MRGPRX2 transfected HEK293 cells, induced by the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the basic secretagogue C48/80, are effectively inhibited by ssON in a dose-dependent manner. Further, ssON demonstrates a capability to inhibit LL-37 and C48/80 activation in vivo in two mouse models. We show that intradermal injection of ssON in mice is able to block itch induced via C48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. Histological staining revealed that ssON inhibits acute mast cell degranulation in murine skin treated with C48/80. Lastly, we show that ssON treatment ameliorates LL-37-induced inflammation in a rosacea mouse model. Since there is a need for new therapeutics targeting non-IgE-mediated activation of mast cells, ssON could be used as a prospective drug candidate to resolve itch and inflammation in certain dermatoses. PMID: 33101278 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
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