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    We have a Member Forum which you can view and read the posts as a guest. 

    However to post in our state of the art forum you register as a non voting member. Simply provide your email address and create your own display name to join. You may also register with your Facebook, Twitter or Google secure login. 

    However to be a voting member you must join the RRDi and identify yourself when registering with your contact information to be able to vote who sits on the board of directors. You are not required to be a voting member. The RRDi will never reveal your identity to anyone so you can rest assured our privacy policy is solid. You may want to read this post, entitled, Anonymity, Transparency and Posting, look for the subheading, How You Can Remain Anonymous Posting in the RRDi Member Forum. Members can also post articles on rosacea which may be used later for publication either on our web site as a promoted article [see some of our member published articles] or as an article in a future publication of the Journal of the RRDi. There is also a member Blogs Area and member Gallery Area for your use if you join the RRDi. Also, ask about a free G Suite account available if you volunteer with our non profit organization (mention you want to volunteer when you join). We cordially invite you to join whether or not you can volunteer or post in our Member Forum. Increasing our membership shows you care about rosacea sufferers. Membership is free. If you have any questions, contact us. 

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    • [Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma: A case report]. Arch Argent Pediatr. 2019 Feb 01;117(1):e56-e58 Authors: Garais JA, Bonetto VN, Frontino L, Salduna MD, Ruiz Lascano A Abstract
      Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma is a childhood condition characterized by asymptomatic erythematous-violaceous nodules, often confused with abscesses. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors have postulated its relationship with infantile rosacea. We present a case of a patient with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma, with ocular involvement and a good response to oral metronidazole treatment.
      PMID: 30652457 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Rosacea: Relative risk vs Absolute Risk of Malignant Comorbidities. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Jan 14;: Authors: Tjahjono LA, Cline A, Huang WW, Fleischer AB, Feldman SR PMID: 30654083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Trigger, tripwire, flareup and flush. These are probably the four most common terms used when discussing rosacea. Because of poor communication and rosaceans not understanding what there terms actually mean much confusion results, adding to the already confusing dilemma of rosacea understanding. So to set the record: 

      Flare up according to the NRS is "a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples.."  

      Tripwire or Trigger is the same thing according to the NRS who uses these words interchangeably and states that both terms mean, "factors that may cause a rosacea sufferer to experience a flare-up—a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples. [1]

      A medical dictionary source defines flush as: flush 1. transient, episodic redness of the face and neck caused by certain diseases, ingestion of certain drugs or other substances, heat, emotional factors, or physical exertion. See also erythema. [2]

      A blush is a flush usually caused by psychological factors. A flush can be caused by a any number of factors as noted above including psychological factors. 

      The reason this is brought up is that while most rosaceans confuse flushing with a flare up there are rosaceans who report having a flare up of rosacea and DO NOT FLUSH. These ones are admittedly fewer in number, and flushing is usually associated with a flare up, but nevertheless demonstrates that flushing is not necessarily a rosacea flare up. One could flush or blush and the skin returns to normal in a rosacea sufferer. Flushing does not NECESSARILY mean a rosacea flare up and it only means that it MAY produce a rosacea flare up. Those who think flushing is rosacea is like thinking pimples mean you have rosacea (or for that matter, believing that erythema is rosacea). There is more to a diagnosis of rosacea than simply having pimples and erythema (see Diagnosis). For example, one could have erythema and have Atopic Dermatitis, not rosacea.  Flushing is one of the signs or symptoms usually associated with rosacea, but not necessarily required. Pimples are associated with rosacea but not necessarily required, i.e., Phenotype 2. Rosacea is always associated with redness or erythema.  Hopefully, if rosaceans understand these terms, trigger, tripwire, flareup and flush better, we will all be on the same page when we discuss rosacea. 

      End Notes

      [1] Coping With Rosacea, National Rosacea Society, page 1

      [2] Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary
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