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    We have a Member Forum which you can view and read the posts as a guest. 

    However to post in our state of the art forum you register as a non voting member. Simply provide your email address and create your own display name to join. You may also register with your Facebook, Twitter or Google secure login. 

    However to be a voting member you must join the RRDi and identify yourself when registering with your contact information to be able to vote who sits on the board of directors. You are not required to be a voting member. The RRDi will never reveal your identity to anyone so you can rest assured our privacy policy is solid. You may want to read this post, entitled, Anonymity, Transparency and Posting, look for the subheading, How You Can Remain Anonymous Posting in the RRDi Member Forum. Members can also post articles on rosacea which may be used later for publication either on our web site as a promoted article [see some of our member published articles] or as an article in a future publication of the Journal of the RRDi. There is also a member Blogs Area and member Gallery Area for your use if you join the RRDi. Also, ask about a free G Suite account available if you volunteer with our non profit organization (mention you want to volunteer when you join). We cordially invite you to join whether or not you can volunteer or post in our Member Forum. Increasing our membership shows you care about rosacea sufferers. Membership is free. If you have any questions, contact us. 

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  • Posts

    • Recognizing Rosacea: Tips on Differential Diagnosis J Drugs Dermatol. 2019 Sep 01;18(9):888-894 Authors: Johnson SM, Berg A, Barr C Abstract Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory dermatosis with a variety of clinical manifestations. Rosacea primarily affects the central face, and includes papules, pustules, erythema, telangiectasias, perilesional redness, phymatous changes, and even ocular involvement. Symptoms may vary among different patients and even vary over time in an individual patient. Central facial redness affects many adults and can be an indicator of the chronic inflammatory disease rosacea. Rosacea is a clinical diagnosis based on the patient’s history, physical examination, and exclusion of other disorders. It is under-diagnosed, particularly in individuals with skin of color. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians with the tools and understanding needed to correctly identify rosacea and differentiate it from other conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(9):888-894 PMID: 31524344 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Anti-Inflammatory Dose Doxycycline Plus Adapalene 0.3% and Benzoyl Peroxide 2.5% Gel for Severe Acne J Drugs Dermatol. 2019 Sep 01;18(9):924-927 Authors: Kircik LH Abstract Acne is primarily an inflammatory disease. Anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline (40mg: 30mg immediate release and 10mg delayed release beads) is approved for the treatment of rosacea but with demonstrated efficacy for acne. Fixed combination adapalene 0.3% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel is a once-daily formulation approved for the topical management of acne vulgaris. It has both anti-inflammatory and anti-comedogenic properties. Options for management of severe acne are somewhat limited; many patients are not candidates for or refuse treatment with isotretinoin. Systemic antibiotics may be indicated; acne treatment guidelines emphasize antibiotic stewardship in light of increasing concerns about antibiotic resistance and call for the judicious use of conventional systemic antibiotics. This single-center, open label pilot study involving 20 subjects with severe acne assessed the effects of combination treatment using anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline plus adapalene 0.3% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel on IGA scores as well as inflammatory lesion, non-inflammatory lesion, and nodule counts. By week 12, 95% of subjects had at least a 2-grade improvement in IGA scores. Reductions in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts were statistically significant beginning at week 4 and continuing through week 12. By week 4, the percentage of patients with 0 nodules was 70%, compared to baseline of 20%. Further improvements were seen through week 12. Treatment was well-tolerated with no serious treatment-related adverse events. Combination treatment with anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline plus combination adapalene 0.3% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel is safe and effective for management of severe acne. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(9):924-927. PMID: 31524349 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Intralesional Steroids for the Management of Periorificial Granulomatous Dermatitis J Drugs Dermatol. 2019 Sep 01;18(9):955 Authors: von Csiky-Sessoms S Abstract A 42-year-old male with skin type I and a history of rosacea and eczema presented with crusting, erythema, and pustules distributed on the left oral commissure. Angular cheilitis was diagnosed and regular petrolatum use recommended until resolution of the lesion. Eight days later, with no improvement in symptoms, fungal and bacterial cultures were performed which resulted in the growth of cutibacterium acnes, a variant of p. acnes. PMID: 31524997 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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