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    Volunteer Members of the RRDi who spend time actually volunteering may receive a G Suite (formerly Google Apps for Non Profits) account which includes a free Gmail account with 30 GB of email and Google Drive storage. Your email could be YOUR_NAME@irosacea.org (if available).  

    To request your G Suite (includes the RRDi domain Gmail account) fill out the Join the RRDi. In the comment box mention the G Suite Gmail account email address you want. 

    Learn more by visiting this page, The RRDi and the Medical Digital Revolution, and scroll down the page to the subheading, G SUITE FOR NON PROFITS.

    To understand the Google for NON PROFITS click here

    For more info on G Suite click here.

     

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    • Related Articles Miscellaneous skin disease and the metabolic syndrome. Clin Dermatol. 2018 Jan - Feb;36(1):94-100 Authors: Seremet S, Gurel MS Abstract
      The link between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and skin diseases is increasingly important, with new associations being discovered. The association between MetS and psoriasis or MetS and hidradenitis suppurativa is well known, although the relationship between MetS and various autoimmune or inflammatory diseases has only recently attracted interest. Some inflammatory skin diseases, such as vitiligo, scleredema, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, Behçet disease, rosacea, necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, skin tags, knuckle pads, and eruptive xanthomas, have possible associations with MetS. In this review, we examine the state of knowledge involving the relationship between MetS and these dermatologic diseases.
      PMID: 29241760 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Reply to: "Rosacea and alcohol intake". J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Jan;78(1):e27 Authors: Li S, Drucker AM, Cho E, Qureshi AA, Li WQ PMID: 29241804 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Given the evidence for an increased risk of GI disease in rosacea, further research into the role of the microbiome in rosacea is warranted. The role of the gut microbiome is an area of research of multiple inflammatory skin diseases. Synbiotics are a combination of prebiotics and probiotics, substances that support a healthy gut microbiome. In a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in atopic dermatitis (AD), it was found that the use of synbiotics for at least eight weeks had a significant effect on a measure of AD severity. Research is underway into the use of synbiotics in other inflammatory skin diseases. Diet and rosacea: the role of dietary change in the management of rosacea.
    • "The association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and rosacea is another topic of interest. A Taiwanese nationwide cohort study of over 89,000 patients with rosacea found an independent association with IBD incidence, as compared to matched controls. This association has been replicated by Egeberg et al.’s Danish study and Li et al.’s prospective study in American women. Moreover, both IBD and rosacea share possible genetic overlap on the histocompatibility complex class II gene HLA DRB1*03:01." Diet and rosacea: the role of dietary change in the management of rosacea.    
    • "Young men with acne have also been studied with respect to their diet. Smith et al recently studied 43 men (15–25 years) with acne who were given instructions to follow a high carbohydrate diet similar to their current diet (control group) compared to a group given instructions to follow a low glycemic load diet for 12 weeks. There was a significant decrease in the number of acne lesions following diet modification in the low glycemic load group compared to the control group." The Role of Diet in Acne and Rosacea
      JCAD Online Editor | September 16, 2008
      by Jonette E. Keri, MD, PhD, and Adena E. Rosenblatt
      Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
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