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    We are rosaceans and this is a grassroots rosacea non profit organization. Finding the Cure for rosacea. If you like to read, scroll down to the bottom. If you prefer videos, scroll down to view all the videos about the RRDi. What's with the butterfly? We need 100 Active Subscribers! To learn more about the RRDi watch the videos by scrolling below, or if you prefer reading, keep scrolling. 

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  • The Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is the first 501 (c) (3) non profit organization approved by the IRS established June 7, 2004 in the State of Hawaii, USA for the purpose of finding a cure for rosacea, researching rosacea, and to form a rosacea patient advocacy organization established by volunteer rosaceans for rosacea sufferers. In December 2019 we have moved the corporate office to the State of Alabama and have registered as a non profit corporation.

    Our non profit organization for rosacea patient advocacy web site is a digital data repository of rosacea information that can serve you personally as an armamentarium of rosacea treatment options. We have tools to help you in your search for a cure to rosacea, or at least a way to control it.

    We have chosen the Invision Community as the chief digital platform tool (with beta versions for Android and iOS mobile apps) to use, a public platform for guests and inactive members. Our member forum is the most private forum for rosacea on the internet. We also have a private platform using Tapatalk using our rosacea-control.com domain. 

    We are rosacea sufferers [rosaceans] and all are volunteers. We rely on donations. No one is receiving a salary or getting paid. We don't spend donated funds on private contractors that are owned by any member of the board of directors. We do not spend donated funds so our members can attend dermatology conventions. All donations are spent on keeping this non profit organization for rosacea sufferers a viable patient advocacy organization and our rules state that 'members may not profit from the institute' (rule number 3). Read our mission statement

    No one has a paid salary, we pay NO private contractors nor do we use donations so our members can attend dermatology conventions. 

    All the other rosacea non profits are not run by rosacea sufferers (see Other Non Profit Rosacea Organizations on this page). Check out the other non profit organizations for rosacea, discover for yourself and you will find out who serve on the board of directors (non rosaceans - dermatologists/businessmen) and then simply follow the money (what does the organization spend most of the donated money on?) and discover for yourself that the other non profit organizations for rosacea spend most of the donations on (1) private contractors, (2) dermatologist member conventions or (3) salaries. We have no special interest other than finding the cure for rosacea and forming a rosacea patient advocacy organization. Our non profit has no salaries, no spending on private contractors, no expenses for member conventions. Follow the money (this is where we spend our money). Notice where most of the money is spent with another rosacea non profit, who has spent millions of dollars on private contractors owned by the president of the non profit and only 10% on rosacea research. 

    Read our Misson Statement and see if you agree? If you suffer from rosacea, this is the rosacea non profit to join. Your membership increases our impact on the medical community. Our goal is to reach 10,000 members. Please join and help us reach our goal. What if 10,000 members got together and each donated one dollar and all the members agreed we should sponsor a certain rosacea research study. Is this possible? Only with your help. 

    You may want to read our post about Anonymity, Transparency and Posting before joining. We have now switched to a subscription member service

    The logo of the RRDi includes a butterfly because rosacea typically manifests itself in a facial butterfly formation, however the irony of the butterfly effect is apropros. Learn More.

    You may want to learn about the history of this non profit or why it was formed

    If you are a rosacean, volunteer by joining our private member forum and posting or in our public guest forum (registration required) becoming a part of 'finding the cure' for rosacea if you join. Our goal is 10,000 members. Membership is free. You can help us reach our goal by joining with just your email address.  if privacy is of paramount importance to you use Sign in with Apple and join our private member forum. Or you can simply browse our web site and guest forum for free. Our non profit affiliate store is another source of rosacea treatment options. 

    If you want to post about your rosacea, we certainly allow you to post feedback in our GUEST forum or register an account in our member forum, i.e,, in our public community support, and, if you want to learn about and treat your rosacea, this is the best non profit organization for rosacea sufferers. At the social networks like Facebook, Instagram or Reddit can you find the incredible digital tools the RRDi provides free to its members or the ability to find what you are searching for in rosacea research? Are you able through such social media groups to influence the medical community how you feel about rosacea? Read our mission statement and compare with your private rosacea social media group, i.e., like Facebook, Instagram or Reddit.  

    The RRDi is registered at GuideStar and Trustpilot • Write a Review of Our Non Profit

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  • Posts

    • Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2023 Jan 26;16:253-256. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S394754. eCollection 2023. ABSTRACT Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative antibiotic commonly used to treat acne, rosacea, and other inflammatory skin conditions. Taking minocycline risks inducing skin pigmentation. If minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation is not treated, it may take months to years for the symptoms to subside after discontinuation of the drug, or the hyperpigmentation may never disappear completely, which can lead to cosmetic anxiety and affect people's quality of life. Previous treatment options for hyperpigmentation were mainly q-switched nd: YAG, ruby, and alexandrite lasers. This article reports a case of facial hyperpigmentation caused by minocycline using a combination of chemical peel and intense pulsed light in a patient with eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells syndrome) who was taking oral minocycline. This case suggests combining chemical peel and intense pulsed light is an effective treatment option for minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation. PMID:36726812 | PMC:PMC9885878 | DOI:10.2147/CCID.S394754 {url} = URL to article
    • Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2023 Jan 11;16:71-77. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S391893. eCollection 2023. ABSTRACT PURPOSE: Rosacea is a common facial dermatosis, with flares induced by exposome factors. M89PF containing Vichy mineralizing water, probiotic fractions, hyaluronic acid, niacinamide and tocopherol repairs the skin barrier and reinforces skin defences against exposome factors. This study assessed the benefit of M89PF in subjects with rosacea associated with erythema and sensitive skin during the Covid-19 pandemic using protective face masks. METHODS: M89PF was compared to usual skin care in a randomized, split-face study, for 30 days in subjects with rosacea associated with erythema and sensitive skin. Clinical evaluations included erythema, desquamation, skin tightness, dryness, burning sensation, itching, stinging, stinging test, and local tolerability. Instrument evaluations included erythema, skin hydration and TEWL. Subject satisfaction was also assessed. RESULTS: Erythema significantly improved with M89PF at both time points (p<0.01 at D15, and p<0.001 at D30). Skin sensitivity assessed by the skin stinging test improved significantly (p<0.01) with M89PF at D30, compared to baseline and usual skin care. Skin erythema, tightness, dryness, hydration and TEWL significantly improved (p≤0.05) with M89PF at D15 and D30, versus baseline and the untreated side. Subjects were highly satisfied with M89PF at D15 and D30. Tolerance was very good in all subjects. CONCLUSION: In subjects with rosacea, M89PF significantly reduces erythema, skin tightness, dryness and TEWL, and improves skin hydration and skin sensitivity, even when using protective masks. M89PF is well tolerated and received high satisfaction ratings. CLINICALTRIALSGOV NO: NCT05562661. PMID:36660190 | PMC:PMC9843703 | DOI:10.2147/CCID.S391893 {url} = URL to article
    • Arch Dermatol Res. 2023 Jan 18. doi: 10.1007/s00403-023-02531-7. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Patient adherence to medications usually increases with age, however, it can also be impacted by other factors. Accountability is a psychosocial construct that is defined as the expectation for an individual to account for their actions. Accountability may also influence patients' motivation to adhere to their treatments. We assessed the relationship between age and perception of accountability as well as efficacy of interventions to improve accountability in a clinical study of 30 rosacea patients. Accountability was assessed using the validated Accountability Measurement Tool. Interventions to improve accountability included a digital interaction group and a digital skin analysis group. All patients were given ivermectin cream 1% and informed to apply it daily for 3-months. There was a negative association between age and AMT scores in all intervention groups, including the control group. Younger patients have a baseline greater perception of accountability that responded more to our interventions. PMID:36652005 | DOI:10.1007/s00403-023-02531-7 {url} = URL to article
    • JCI Insight. 2023 Jan 12:e151846. doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.151846. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease with a fluctuating course of excessive inflammation and apparent neovascularization. Microbial dysbiosis with high density of B. oleronius and increased activity of kallikrein 5, which cleaves cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, are key pathogenic triggers in rosacea. However, how these events are linked to the disease remains unknown. Here, we show that type I interferons produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells represent the pivotal link between dysbiosis, the aberrant immune response, and neovascularization. Compared to other commensal bacteria, B. oleronius is highly susceptible and preferentially killed by cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides leading to enhanced generation of complexes with bacterial DNA. These bacterial DNA-complexes but not DNA-complexes derived from host cells are required for cathelicidin-induced activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and type I interferon production. Moreover, kallikrein 5 cleaves cathelicidin into peptides with heightened DNA-binding and type I interferon-inducing capacities. In turn, excessive type I interferon expression drives neoangiogenesis via IL22 induction and upregulation of the IL22 receptor on endothelial cells. These findings unravel a novel pathomechanism, which directly links hallmarks of rosacea to the killing of dysbiotic commensal bacteria with induction of a pathogenic type I interferon-driven and IL22-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:36633910 | DOI:10.1172/jci.insight.151846 {url} = URL to article
    • J Clin Med. 2022 Dec 23;12(1):115. doi: 10.3390/jcm12010115. ABSTRACT Rosacea is a common skin disease that affects about 5% of the general population. Its symptoms include telangiectasia, persistent erythema, burning/stinging sensation, dry skin sensation, and pruritus. It is characterized by a chronic course with frequent exacerbation. It often coexists with anxiety and depression, reducing the quality of life of affected patients. The etiopathogenesis of rosacea is complex and not fully elucidated; hence, there is no causative effective treatment. In this review, we highlight the role of a cosmetologist in the treatment of rosacea and the maintenance of remission. As part of medical treatment, patients are advised to introduce lifestyle changes and use proper skin care; a cosmetologist can help educate patients affected with rosacea, create effective home care programs for skin care, and support them with treatments in beauty salons. Proper skin care is essential, including the use of dermocosmetics, cleansing of the skin, and frequent visits to beauty salons for tailored apparatus procedures. A cosmetologist is more accessible to patients and can help implement healthy daily habits, including skin care and eating habits, as well as support and mediate good communication between the patient and the patient's treating physician, thereby improving compliance and ensuring long-term satisfactory outcomes. PMID:36614915 | DOI:10.3390/jcm12010115 {url} = URL to article
    • J Drugs Dermatol. 2023 Jan 1;22(1):45-53. doi: 10.36849/JDD.7021. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Rosacea is primarily an inflammatory disease of facial skin associated with impaired skin barrier function. While it is commonly thought of as a Caucasian person's disease, it is likely underdiagnosed in people of color, including Asians, leading to missed and delayed diagnoses and increased morbidity. The purpose of this review is to highlight literature on rosacea in Asian people and the role of non-prescription skincare in managing rosacea. METHODS: Four dermatologists (the panel) completed pre-meeting surveys and participated in a web meeting to discuss the role of skin care in treating rosacea in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region. The survey results were summarized, then presented during the virtual meeting. These survey results and relevant papers identified through a literature review were then discussed. This review shows the fruit of these discussions, as well as the advisors' expert opinions and experiences. RESULTS: The panel crafted 5 consensus statements regarding the role of skin care in the treatment of rosacea in the APAC region. The most common forms of rosacea seen by the advisors are mostly erythematous and papulopustular. Among the panel, doxycycline is the most popular treatment for papulopustular rosacea. The panel prioritize gentleness when choosing skincare products for patients with rosacea. CONCLUSIONS: In Asian patients with rosacea, adjunctive skincare is an important part of treatment, maintenance, and prescription treatment. Given the highly sensitive skin of certain Asian patients with rosacea, avoiding potentially irritating substances is crucial. J Drugs Dermatol. 2023;22(1):45-53. doi:10.36849/JDD.7021. PMID:36607763 | DOI:10.36849/JDD.7021 {url} = URL to article
    • J Drugs Dermatol. 2023 Jan 1;22(1):54-59. doi: 10.36849/JDD.7150. ABSTRACT Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) has been used extensively in industry and health care for more than a century and has been approved for the treatment of acne for over 60 years. Recently, BPO received a second approved indication by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of rosacea. Topical BPO use has historically been limited by tolerability, photosensitivity, oxidation, and, uncommonly, contact allergy. Research has led to enhanced efficacy and tolerability, as well as the combination of BPO with other topical medications. These advances have allowed extended use of BPO in additional dermatologic conditions that may not have been feasible in the past. Additionally, the role of BPO in preventing antibiotic resistance cannot be underestimated. Here, we discuss the historical limitations of BPO and recent advances developed to overcome these limitations. We also describe newly approved BPO medications and their role in aiding antibiotic stewardship. J Drugs Dermatol. 2023;22(1):54-59. doi:10.36849/JDD.7150. PMID:36607767 | DOI:10.36849/JDD.7150 {url} = URL to article
    • Dermatologie (Heidelb). 2023 Jan 2. doi: 10.1007/s00105-022-05096-0. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis vulgaris are common inflammatory dermatoses. Of note, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of these common dermatologic diseases varies considerably between people with different colors of skin. Yet, most dermatology textbooks present and describe the clinical pictures of White people. To provide excellent dermatological care for all patients, it is of central importance to know the epidemiology and recognize key clinical characteristics of these diseases in patients with skin of color (SOC). In acne, cultural habits of Blacks (use of steroid-based lighteners, comedogenic hair care products) may lead to manifestation of specific forms of acne. In addition, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloids pose particular therapeutic challenges in this patient group. Atopic dermatitis in Asians shows a clinical and histological picture that is similar to psoriasis in Whites. By contrast, atopic dermatitis manifests on the extensor side in Black people. Due to the difficulty of recognizing erythema in SOC, the severity of the respective inflammatory diseases in these individuals is often underestimated. The treatment of acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis does not differ between people of different skin colors. The exception is the necessary therapy for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in all the inflammatory dermatoses mentioned, and for keloids in acne. PMID:36592194 | DOI:10.1007/s00105-022-05096-0 {url} = URL to article
    • Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2022 Dec 20;15:2807-2816. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S390921. eCollection 2022. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Rosacea appears predominantly in highly visible areas of the facial region. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the psychological status and quality of life(QOL) of rosacea. METHODS: We used a hospital-based cross-sectional analytical study design between Jan 1, 2020, and Jan 1, 2021. We analyzed the differences and correlations in the severity of rosacea and its impacts on QOL and mental health, separately. RESULTS: 469 patients with rosacea were included. The mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was 12.6±7.7 and the affected level of DLQI was moderately severe. The total score of Rosacea-specific Quality-of-Life instrument (RosQol) was 2.34 ± 0.84, and the scores of emotion, symptoms, and function were 2.41 ± 0.99, 2.37 ±0.82, and 2.03 ± 0.89, respectively. 44.8% of patients suffered from anxiety and 37.5% from depression. There were statistically significant differences in the incidence of anxiety (p <0.001), the DLQL (p =0.02), RosQol emotion (p =0.04), symptom (p <0.01) and function (p =0.02) scores in the different severity. In addition, worsening QOL was significantly associated with increased disease severity [Spearman's rank correlation index (r) ranging from 0.171 to 0.266,p<0.01 (RosQol); r =0.104,p =0.024 (DLQI)]. There was also a positive correlation between anxiety [r =0.155; p<0.01] and the different severity levels. CONCLUSION: Rosacea maybe has a greater significant impact on patient's QOL and mental health. And the impact of QOL and mental health tend to deteriorate significantly with increasing disease severity. The relationship suggests that QOL assessment is of great interest in clinical practice and should be further explored. PMID:36573169 | PMC:PMC9789702 | DOI:10.2147/CCID.S390921 {url} = URL to article
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