Jump to content
  • History of the RRDi


    There was a post at a Yahoo group in  November 23, 2002 that started the idea of making a non profit organization for rosacea sufferers to collaborate together. 

    The Rosacea Research & Development Institute began as an idea by the founder, Brady Barrows, on November 23, 2002 when he founded the following yahoo group:

    health.groups.yahoo.com/group/international-rosacea-society

    The above yahoo group was changed on July 24, 2004 to:

    health.groups.yahoo.com/group/irosacea

    And then later changed on February 14, 2005 to this yahoo group:

    health.groups.yahoo.com/group/rosacea-research

    The above yahoo group was deleted June 7, 2006 since the private forum for corporate members began in April/May 2006. Since then, Yahoo Groups has been removed from the internet. 

    A need for a non-profit organization that heard the voice of rosaceans suffering from this disease was seen early on and discussion continues to this day. Upon moving to Hawaii the founder discovered that forming a non-profit organization in this state would be simpler than in other states and applied for approval as a non-profit corporation. A Charter was set up. The non profit recognition was approved on June 7, 2004 by the State of Hawaii and after a lengthy period, tax-exempt approval as a 501 (c) (3) non profit organization was obtained by the IRS in January 2006 and recognition was effective back to June 7, 2004. This process took over a year and a half. More details of all this are written in the article Why Form Another Non Profit Organization For Rosacea?

    The Board of Directors were chosen by the corporation members and the officers were appointed in January 2005. More board members were added in 2006 and later.

    The web site is constantly being improved by volunteers. Volunteers are seeking funding and you can join us to seek corporate donations, seek grants, or find the best minds to join the RRDi MAC, the only medical advisory committee volunteering to find a cure for rosacea, listen to corporate RRDi members' concerns and advise the board of directors on the direction the RRDi should go. Several private member forums were experimented which have not proven popular. For a number of years the RRDi recommended Warren Stuart's www.rosaceagroup.org as the public forum and volunteers have made the private forum for corporate members on the irosacea.org web site. To use the public forum you must join the RRDi. This public corporate member forum is where decisions are discussed. The public forum can be found at this url:

    http://irosacea.org/forums

    Steve Andreessen spent many volunteer hours on not only the above IPB forum (now called Invision Community)  but also our web site. Warren Stuart has also spent many hours volunteering on the web site as well. Under Warren's direction we purchased the Invision Power Services forum (now called Invision Community). Sadly, Warren Stuart passed away. David Pascoe took over Warren's Rosacea Forum. The focus of the RRDi for years has been to gather together the best minds on rosacea into the RRDi Medical Advisory Committee, gathering volunteers to raise public awareness of the RRDi in the Public Relations Committee and to increase RRDi membership, and finally to increase funding through volunteer efforts in the Funding Committee by volunteers. You can see the results of all this volunteer effort and you can become part of it by joining with just an email address. You may want to read the Message from the Founder and our post about Anonymity, Transparency and Posting before joining.

    The RRDi has been affiliated with sponsoring Tapatalk since some users prefer using Tapatalk on mobile devices. In 2019 we have sponsored a private Tapatalk Rosaceans Forum



  • Posts

    • If we had 100 core members who subscribe a dollar a month we could see the RRDi website and non profit organization going. Would you be one the core 100 members who subscribe a dollar a month? 
    • Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2024 Jun 6;151(3):103244. doi: 10.1016/j.annder.2023.103244. Online ahead of print. NO ABSTRACT PMID:38848643 | DOI:10.1016/j.annder.2023.103244 {url} = URL to article
    • Indian J Dermatol. 2024 Mar-Apr;69(2):152-158. doi: 10.4103/ijd.ijd_815_22. Epub 2024 Apr 29. ABSTRACT Gluten, a polypeptide hapten, found in many cereals such as barley, wheat, rye, oats, and others, has been recently implicated in a range of cutaneous disorders ranging from chronic plaque psoriasis through psoriatic arthritis, urticaria (chronic as well as paediatric onset), and angioedema to lichen planus, vitiligo, and rosacea. The evidence for them is still not well reviewed. To generate evidence for the causal role of gluten in various dermatological disorders. The Pubmed, MedLine, and EMBASE databases were searched using the keywords "Gluten" and one of the dermatoses, namely, "Atopic Dermatitis", "Vasculitis", "Psoriasis", "Psoriatic Arthritis", "Acne", "Alopecia Areata", and "Immunobullous disorders". All articles published in English for which free full text was available were taken into consideration. The search strategy returned in a total of 1487 articles which were screened for relevance and elimination of duplicates. Ultimately, around 114 articles were deemed suitable. The data were extracted and presented in the narrative review format. A simple and cost-effective solution to many of these chronic and lifelong conditions is to restrict gluten in the diet. However, the dermatologist would do well to remember that in the vast majority of dermatological disorders including the ones listed here, gluten restriction is not warranted and can even lead to nutritional deficiencies. The evidence varied from Grade I for some disorders like psoriatic arthritis to Grade IV to most disorders like acne, vitiligo, vasculitis, and atopic dermatitis. Herein, we review the evidence for each of these conditions and make practical recommendations for gluten restriction in them. PMID:38841247 | PMC:PMC11149804 | DOI:10.4103/ijd.ijd_815_22 {url} = URL to article
    • Skin Appendage Disord. 2024 Jun;10(3):207-214. doi: 10.1159/000536246. Epub 2024 Feb 2. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory dermatosis characterized by erythema, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules on the central face. The frequency of contact sensitization complicating rosacea and its therapy is unknown, with only few studies published in the literature. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate contact sensitivity in patients with rosacea. METHODS: A total of 50 rosacea patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Both groups were patch tested with the European Baseline Series. RESULTS: A positive reaction to at least one allergen of the European Baseline Series was observed in 15 (30%) of rosacea patients and 10 (20%) of the healthy controls. Although the rate of positive reaction in the rosacea group was higher than in the controls, no statistically significant difference was documented. In addition, the total number of positive reactions to allergens in the rosacea group was higher than the control group, namely, 26 versus 17. CONCLUSION: Contact hypersensitivity may coexist with rosacea. Its identification holds significant clinical relevance, influencing the long-term management and justifying the application of patch testing in rosacea patients. PMID:38835717 | PMC:PMC11147521 | DOI:10.1159/000536246 {url} = URL to article
    • J Cosmet Dermatol. 2024 Jun 3. doi: 10.1111/jocd.16372. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND & AIM: Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory, multifactorial disease for which combination therapy could be an effective treatment. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the combination therapy of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% as a single cream for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea. METHOD: A stable and appropriate formulation was prepared by adding the aqueous phase to the lipid phase while being stirred. The stability and physicochemical properties of the formulation were evaluated under accelerated conditions. Twelve patients (36-60 years) with mild to moderate papulopustular rosacea and a Demodex count of five or more were treated with the combination of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% cream. Clinician's Erythema Assessment (CEA), Patients Self-Assessment (PSA), skin erythema (ΔE) and lightness (ΔL), and skin biophysical parameters including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, pH, and sebum content, as well as erythema and melanin index and ultrasound parameters, were measured before treatment and 4 and 8 weeks after. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded. RESULTS: CEA and PSA decreased significantly from 3 to 2 after 8 weeks, respectively (p-value = 0.014 for CEA and 0.010 for PSA). ΔE and ΔL, as well as skin erythema index and TEWL improved after 8 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05). Two patients withdrew from the study in the first week because of local adverse effects; one developed flushing following treatment and left the investigation after 4 weeks and another patient withdrew from the study after 4 weeks due to deciding to become pregnant. CONCLUSION: Eight-week treatment with the combination of brimonidine 0.33% and ivermectin 1% was shown to be effective for improvement of erythema and inflammatory lesions in mild to moderate papulopustular rosacea. PMID:38831548 | DOI:10.1111/jocd.16372 {url} = URL to article
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use