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  • History of the RRDi


    There was a post at a Yahoo group in  November 23, 2002 that started the idea of making a non profit organization for rosacea sufferers to collaborate together. 

    The Rosacea Research & Development Institute began as an idea by the founder, Brady Barrows, on November 23, 2002 when he founded the following yahoo group:

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/international-rosacea-society/

    The above yahoo group was changed on July 24, 2004 to:

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/irosacea/

    And then later changed on February 14, 2005 to this yahoo group:

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/rosacea-research/

    The above yahoo group was deleted June 7, 2006 since the private forum for corporate members began in April/May 2006.

    A need for a non-profit organization that heard the voice of rosaceans suffering from this disease was seen early on and discussion continues to this day. Upon moving to Hawaii the founder discovered that forming a non-profit organization in this state would be simpler than in other states and applied for approval as a non-profit corporation. A Charter was set up. The non profit recognition was approved on June 7, 2004 by the State of Hawaii and after a lengthy period, tax-exempt approval as a 501 (c) (3) non profit organization was obtained by the IRS in January 2006 and recognition was effective back to June 7, 2004. This process took over a year and a half. More details of all this are written in the article Why Form Another Non Profit Organization For Rosacea?

    The Board of Directors were chosen by the corporation members and the officers were appointed in January 2005. More board members were added in 2006 and later.

    The web site is constantly being improved by volunteers. Volunteers are seeking funding and you can join us to seek corporate donations, seek grants, or find the best minds to join the RRDi MAC, the only medical advisory committee volunteering to find a cure for rosacea, listen to corporate RRDi members' concerns and advise the board of directors on the direction the RRDi should go. Several private member forums were experimented which have not proven popular. For a number of years the RRDi recommended Warren Stuart's www.rosaceagroup.org as the public forum and volunteers have made the private forum for corporate members on the irosacea.org web site. To use the private forum you must join the RRDi. This private corporate member forum is where decisions are discussed. The private forum can be found at this url:

    http://irosacea.org/forums

    Steve Andreessen spent many volunteer hours on not only the above IPB forum (now called Invision Community)  but also our web site. Warren Stuart has also spent many hours volunteering on the web site as well. Under Warren's direction we purchased the Invision Power Services forum (now called Invision Community). Sadly, Warren Stuart passed away. David Pascoe took over Warren's Rosacea Forum. The focus of the RRDi for years has been to gather together the best minds on rosacea into the RRDi Medical Advisory Committee, gathering volunteers to raise public awareness of the RRDi in the Public Relations Committee and to increase RRDi membership, and finally to increase funding through volunteer efforts in the Funding Committee by volunteers. You can see the results of all this volunteer effort and you can become part of it by joining with just an email address. You may want to read the Message from the Founder and our post about Anonymity, Transparency and Posting before joining.

  • Posts

    • We have some instructions provided by IPS on how to use our forum. For example, watch this video on how to change your display name:  Editing your profile Sending/Receiving messages General Posting Control Previewing post content Managing followed content How to Use CLUBS Two Factor Authentication Viewing Attachments Reputation & Reactions Custom Profile Fields User Ranks Post color highlighting Profile Completion Other Profile Settings
    • "The mechanism of action (MOA) of Soolantra® (ivermectin) Cream, 1% in treating rosacea lesions is unknown." However, we are concentrating on an investigation into the 'basis for the vehicle' statement by Galderma regarding Soolantra.  In the Soolantra News post if you scroll down to Cetaphil Base, Galderma, on its Mechanism of Action page, posts : "Soolantra Cream combats inflammatory lesions of rosacea with a formulation designed for tolerability, utilizing Cetaphil® Moisturizing Cream as the basis for the vehicle." However, now this page is no longer available, but we have a screen shot of the Way Back Machine on August 21, 2018 which shows you the statement below:  Soolantra mechanism of action (MOA) (Way Back Machine url)  Actually after a careful search, Galderma has moved the statement that Cetaphil is the 'basis for the vehicle' statement to this page:  https://www.soolantra.com/hcp/about-soolantra-cream SOOLANTRA (ivermectin) cream, 1% is a white to pale yellow hydrophilic cream. Each gram of SOOLANTRA cream contains 10 mg of ivermectin. It is intended for topical use. While the claim by Galderma that utilizing Cetaphil is 'basis for the vehicle' we have investigated and notice the differences with the inactive ingredients in Soolantra with the ingredients in Cetaphil below.  SOOLANTRA cream contains the following inactive ingredients: carbomer copolymer type B, cetyl alcohol, citric acid monohydrate, dimethicone, edetate disodium, glycerin, isopropyl palmitate, methylparaben, oleyl alcohol, phenoxyethanol, polyoxyl 20 cetostearyl ether, propylene glycol, propylparaben, purified water, sodium hydroxide, sorbitan monostearate, and stearyl alcohol. Source Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream Ingredients: Water, Glycerin, Petrolatum, Dicaprylyl Ether, Dimethicone, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetyl Alcohol, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, PEG-30 Stearate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Dimethiconol, Benzyl Alcohol, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Acrylate/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Propylene Glycol, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Hydroxide Source Compare Soolantra inactive ingredients to Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream Ingredients Google Sheet
    • What is interesting is that Galderma claims Soolantra's base is Cetaphil. However, we did an investigation and compared Cetaphil's ingredients with the list shown in Soolantra and discovered there is a difference. For more information:  Soolantra mechanism of action (MOA)  SOOLANTRA (ivermectin) cream, 1% is a white to pale yellow hydrophilic cream. Each gram of SOOLANTRA cream contains 10 mg of ivermectin. It is intended for topical use. SOOLANTRA cream contains the following inactive ingredients: carbomer copolymer type B, cetyl alcohol, citric acid monohydrate, dimethicone, edetate disodium, glycerin, isopropyl palmitate, methylparaben, oleyl alcohol, phenoxyethanol, polyoxyl 20 cetostearyl ether, propylene glycol, propylparaben, purified water, sodium hydroxide, sorbitan monostearate, and stearyl alcohol. Source Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream Ingredients: Water, Glycerin, Petrolatum, Dicaprylyl Ether, Dimethicone, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetyl Alcohol, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, PEG-30 Stearate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Dimethiconol, Benzyl Alcohol, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Acrylate/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Propylene Glycol, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Hydroxide Source Compare Soolantra inactive ingredients to Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream Ingredients Google Sheet
    • With regard to flushing, it would be good to read this post. There are a number of drugs used to avoid flushing. There are also a number of other non prescription treatments to avoid flushing which are found here. 
    • There are so many alcohols in Soolantra's inactive ingredients which cause dryness and flakiness of skin which in turn cause itching and irritation and redness. Parabens and propylene glycol are also there which tend to penetrate the skin to help allow other ingredients to enter and this may be the reason your skin reacted and couldn't handle because everyone's skin reacts differently to chemicals.
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