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  • We have a limited number of the Journal of RRDi available if you simply make a donation of $5 and mention you want a copy mailed to you and give us your mailing address. Otherwise, you can purchase a copy from Amazon below: 

    Paperback                  Kindle Edition

  • Journal of the RRDI Vol 1 No 1

  • Posts

    • From 1998 through 2005 there was an incredible volunteer spirit that drove the formation of the RRDi. Since 2005 the force that motivated so many to bring together rosacea sufferers into a non profit organization has dwindled to just a flickering wick. Why is it that rosaceans (rosacea sufferers) don't volunteer anymore?  Andy Seth, an entrepreneur, has a blog post, The Way We Think About Volunteering Is Dead Wrong, states, "research shows that the happiest volunteers are those who give 2 hours per week. That’s it. 2 hours."   If I could get any rosacean to volunteer 2 hours a weeks, that would be miraculous. Are there volunteers who actually volunteer that many hours a week? There must be, otherwise the study is bogus. If I could get any RRDi member to just post their thought or experience with rosacea for 15 minutes a week I would be elated. I have dotted the RRDi forum with requests to RRDi members to simply post anything and the 1200 plus members as of this date are simply miniscule when it comes to posting. Getting our members to post is a challenge.  The research Mr. Seth referred to may have been the study commented on by the American Psychological Association that reports, "Volunteers lived longer than people who didn't volunteer if they reported altruistic values or a desire for social connections as the main reasons for wanting to volunteer, according to the study." This same study, Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis, the co-author concludes:  "It is reasonable for people to volunteer in part because of benefits to the self; however, our research implies that should these benefits to the self become the main motive for volunteering, they may not see those benefits."  In trying to understand why volunteering amongst rosaceans has continued on this course, and googling this for an answer, The Guardian has an article about this subject and concluded, "But while the benefits of volunteering are clear, there is worrying evidence that the people who could benefit most from giving their time are precisely those least likely to be involved."  Without a doubt this explains the situation. Any thoughts on this subject would be much appreciated. 
    • Dr. Ben Johnson, RRDi MAC Member, discusses a holistic approach to treating rosacea in an interview with Lori Crete, Licensed Esthetician, Spa 10. 
    • I had a mole on my forehead that I was told that 3% Hydrogen Peroxided might remove, so I dabbed a little on the mole and after some weeks it did indeed remove the mole. However, I noticed that the rosacea or seb derm on my forehead that was near the mole also cleared up. So I experimented and began putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on my red spots on my forehead and after some days they began to fade away too!  Since then I have been putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on all my facial rosacea red spots and letting it dry, then adding the ZZ cream, just before bed and this regimen seems to really work for me. I also have taking the Lutein/Zeazanthin 40 mg capsule each day. I also avoid sugar as much as possible and eat very low carbohydrate. 
    • An interesting article in The New York Times Magazine states, "Enough people reported good results that patients were continually lined up at Mesmer’s door waiting for the next session."  Dr. Mesmer is where the word mesmerize comes from. The article explains how 'double blind' placebo controlled clinical studies originated and why drug companies have to differentiate between a drug's actual pharmaceutical effect and the placebo effect. I particularly like this paragraph in the article: 

      "What if, Hall wonders, a treatment fails to work not because the drug and the individual are biochemically incompatible, but rather because in some people the drug interferes with the placebo response, which if properly used might reduce disease? Or conversely, what if the placebo response is, in people with a different variant, working against drug treatments, which would mean that a change in the psychosocial context could make the drug more effective? Everyone may respond to the clinical setting, but there is no reason to think that the response is always positive. According to Hall’s new way of thinking, the placebo effect is not just some constant to be subtracted from the drug effect but an intrinsic part of a complex interaction among genes, drugs and mind. And if she’s right, then one of the cornerstones of modern medicine — the placebo-controlled clinical trial — is deeply flawed."

      What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?, The New York Times Magazine
    • Rosacea Diet Triggers always come up in a discussion of rosacea. Just about every dermatologist parrots the NRS list of proposed rosacea diet triggers, especially physicians explain to their patients to avoid "spicy food and wine." There is a much longer trigger factor list that include other proposed food and drink triggers. An interesting read is Liver, Yogurt, Sour Cream, Cheese, Eggplant, and Spinach that discusses this subject. 

      There are some who can eat anything and their skin looks great. This is probably due to genetics. There is a theory that rosacea is genetic and we have simply been dealt with a bad set of rosacea prone genes. 

      Whether diet really does affect rosacea or acne, do you think that eating a diet with the proper proportion of protein, fat, carbohydrate and essential nutrients improves health? If a person has a poor diet without a proper proportion of the three food groups and lacks the essential nutrients, would that effect the skin?  

      The Rosacea Diet that I have proposed since 1999 you can obtain for free if you join the RRDi and mention when joining you want a free copy and explains in detail what to ingest and what to avoid for just 30 days to see if this improves your skin. Most rosacea sufferers will not do this because it means reducing your carbohydrate intake to 30 grams a day for 30 days, a task that very few are willing to undertake because sugar is addictive. Also due to a misunderstanding on what carbohydrate actually is, many think that carbohydrate is an essential nutrient which is far from the truth. The Rosacea Diet is simply a short test that clearly shows whether reducing carbohydrate for thirty days helps clear your skin. After this simple test one can modify carbohydrate intake according to one's individual situation and may be able to use this method to help control your rosacea, because in RF you will find that the majority will tell you that diet does indeed affect rosacea and acne. While there are a few who claim diet doesn't have anything to do with rosacea, these are definitely in the minority. It would be good to substantiate this in a poll, but the NRS has already done that with its survey asking what food and drink triggers your rosacea and came up with the 'official' diet trigger list which all the dermatologists parrot, namely 'spicy food and wine.' Did the NRS even mention sugar or carbohydrate in its poll?  No. The NRS avoids mentioning sugar or carbohydrate as a rosacea diet trigger. The RRDi does list sugar and carbohydrate as rosacea diet triggers. 
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