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  • Journal of the RRDI Vol 1 No 1

  • Posts

    • And thats exactly the problem with Brevis. We have no way to check the levels of this parasite in rosacea. This study was able to check them by extracting eyelashes and found large numbers of brevis at the root. But what type of test is used to count them in the skin.  Surface tests will only count folliculorum levels and Soolantra won't have much of a problem killing them. But i have my doubts that it is able to kill brevis. 
    • Thanks Rory. Looking forward to your results. Did you see this paper about demodex brevis:  Demodex Brevis Higher Count Than Demodex Folliculorum in Cylindrical Dandruff Patients
    • Well, I think oral ivermectin should be more common as a rosacea treatment. Rosacea skin has a damaged barrier and topicals can be extremely difficult for many to tolerate. Also, topical treatments can be very slow to take effect as seen in a Galderma study of Soolantra where 30% of trial participants took up to a year to achieve clear/almost clear results. Then there is demodex brevis. A much smaller cousin of demodex folliculorum, which lives deeper in the pores. Little is known about brevis and, unlike folliculorum, it doesn't appear to exit pores at night to mate. If this is indeed the case then how do we kill it with a topical which may not penetrate the skin deep enough to reach it.  I think the horse paste is more of a hit in the States than in Europe. Its down to the crazy prescrition medication prices Americans pay, whereas in Europe Soolatra is many times cheaper. Ivermectin, as far as i know, is not water soluble. So any topical gel version of Soolantra will need one of those irritataing oil soluble excipients to disolve it. The horse paste looks like a gel but i have seen comments from people saying that it feels and looks like vaseline after applying it.  Anyway, I'll give it a couple of months and I'll post my results on the page you mentioned.
    • Actually I ran this by my dermatologist who was well aware that Rosaceans were using horse paste topically since he read about it in a journal. There are some dermatologists who are up to date with what is going on and then there are others who are in the dark. He told me that when prescribing Soolantra to his rosacea patients that about one in four patients were successful using it. He gave me a Rx for Soolantra and I tried it and I think now it was the inactive ingredients in Soolantra that irritated my skin. Galderma (or another pharmaceutical company) will probably eventually make an ivermectin gel with a very simple inactive ingredient list to compete with the horse paste that everyone is raving about. Galderma knows what is going on with rosaceans and obviously saw a slight dip in Soolantra sales due to thousands using horse paste. They know that a significant number of rosacea patients are not able to tolerate the inactive ingredients in Soolantra. 
    • Rory, thanks for clearing this up that you are taking the horse paste orally. We do have a thread dedicated to taking ivermectin orally. While many may think that taking oral ivermectin isn't a good idea, the fact is that oral ivermectin has been given to millions of people worldwide and there are long term studies on oral ivermectin in children. However, the RRDi recommends you check with your physician when embarking on this form of treatment as a precaution. It would be better you post in the oral ivermectin thread since this thread is about using horse paste topically. Thanks. 
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