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    • Related ArticlesRosacea and the gastrointestinal system. Australas J Dermatol. 2020 Aug 06;: Authors: Searle T, Ali FR, Carolides S, Al-Niaimi F Abstract Rosacea is a common skin condition characterised by erythema, papules and pustules. Increasing evidence suggests that the gut-skin axis is implicated in the pathogenesis of rosacea. Sufficient evidence exists to support the notion that the gut microbiome plays a role in the inflammatory cutaneous response and there appear to be associations with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. A dysbiotic microbiome and an innate immune system dysregulation contribute to the pathophysiology of rosacea, and further exploration of their roles is warranted. Greater understanding of this condition and the effect of the gut-skin axis could allow for more efficacious and timely treatment. This article reviews our current findings and understanding in the skin and gut relationship in rosacea. PMID: 32761824 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • This is odd to me that a 2020 article is discussing a 'Cross-sectional study of Finnish adults aged 70 to 93 as part of the Norther Finland Cohort 1966 Study.'' Why not examine adults the same age today?
    • In the spirit of posting 'everything rosacea' the RRDi is announcing this 'natural' treatment which the official website states, "Grahams Natural Rosacea Cream is a natural formula which includes clinically tested ingredients to reduce redness. Designed to reduce inflammation and soothe sensitive skin, our rosacea cream will hydrate and calm the skin." It is made in Australia and here are the ingredients: Water Purified, Medium-chain Triglycerides, Cetostearyl Alcohol, Simmondsia chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Coconut Oil, Macrogol Cetostearyl Ether / Polyoxyl 20 Cetostearyl Ether, Tocopherol, Gluconolactone, Niacinamide, Taurine, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Monocaprylate, Ethyl Ascorbic Acid, Retinyl Palmitate, Lactic Acid. If you have used this treatment please find the green reply button and post your experience. 
    • Related ArticlesThe High Prevalence of Skin Diseases in Adults Aged 70 and Older. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2020 Aug 04;: Authors: Sinikumpu SP, Jokelainen J, Haarala AK, Keränen MH, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Huilaja L Abstract BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of skin findings and skin diseases in adults aged 70 and older, and to study the association between cutaneous diseases and socioeconomic status (SES), sex, and living status in the older population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of Finnish adults aged 70 to 93 as part of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study. SETTINGS: Skin examination data were available for 552 adults. MEASUREMENTS: A whole-body skin examination was performed by dermatologists. The associations between skin diseases and SES, sex, and living status were analyzed. RESULTS: Nearly 80% of the adults had at least one skin disease that required further treatment or follow-up. More than one-third of the study cases (39.1%) had three or more simultaneous skin diseases. Skin diseases were more common in men than in women (P < .001). The most common skin diseases were tinea pedis (48.6%), onychomycosis (29.9%), rosacea (25.6%), actinic keratosis (22.3%), and asteatotic eczema (20.8%). Some association was found between skin diseases and SES and living status. CONCLUSION: A whole-body clinical skin examination is important because it reveals important diagnoses. PMID: 32754902 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesFrequency of different types of facial melanoses referring to the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital in 2019, and assessment of their effect on health-related quality of life. BMC Dermatol. 2020 Aug 03;20(1):4 Authors: Amatya B, Jha AK, Shrestha S Abstract BACKGROUND: Abnormalities of facial pigmentation, or facial melanoses, are a common presenting complaint in Nepal and are the result of a diverse range of conditions. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, underlying cause and impact on quality of life of facial pigmentary disorders among patients visiting the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital (NMCTH) over the course of one year. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, NMCTH. We recruited patients with facial melanoses above 16 years of age who presented to the outpatient department. Clinical and demographic data were collected and all the enrolled participants completed the validated Nepali version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). RESULTS: Between January 5, 2019 to January 4, 2020, a total of 485 patients were recruited in the study. The most common diagnoses were melasma (166 patients) and post acne hyperpigmentation (71 patients). Quality of life impairment was highest in patients having melasma with steroid induced rosacea-like dermatitis (DLQI = 13.54 ± 1.30), while it was lowest in participants with ephelides (2.45 ± 1.23). CONCLUSION: Facial melanoses are a common presenting complaint and lead to substantial impacts on quality of life. Accurate diagnosis and management can prevent or treat many facial melanoses, including those that lead to substantial loss of quality of life, such as melasma with steroid induced rosacea-like dermatitis. Health care systems in low and middle-income countries should dedicate resources to the identification, prevention and treatment of these conditions to improve quality of life. PMID: 32746823 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • "We compiled a comprehensive list of candidate medicinal herbs for skincare by analyzing terms employed in the Donguibogam and identified the characteristics of 52 such herbs using SRKs. Each herb exhibited a different skincare function. Our findings will guide the development of new skincare products via experimental and clinical studies....Further in-depth experimental studies are needed, though our work reduces the time required for future experimentation and product development. Our results enhance the understanding of the previously unknown characteristics of medicinal herbs used for skincare and facilitate the discovering additional novel herbs." [1] The Dongui Bogam (동의보감) is a Korean book compiled by the royal physician, Heo Jun (1539 – 1615) and was first published in 1613 during the Joseon Dynasty of Korea. The title literally means “a priceless book about medicines of an Eastern Country”. [2] Wouldn't it be novel of a grassroots rosacea non profit organization to sponsor clinical studies on this? What if 10K members of the RRDi each donated one dollar and sponsored these kind of studies into medicinal herbs for skincare?  Why not donate a dollar now to start the process? End Notes [1] Integr Med Res. 2020 Dec; 9(4): 100436. Identification of candidate medicinal herbs for skincare via data mining of the classic Donguibogam text on Korean medicine Gayoung Cho, Hyo-Min Park, Won-Mo Jung, Woong-Seok Cha, Donghun Lee, Younbyoung Chae [2] Dongui Bogam, Wikipedia image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
    • The RRDi is sponsoring free rosacea blogs so you can have your own private or public blog. That way you can direct your friends to your own blog and discuss what you are doing to control your rosacea. If you want it private here are the steps:  PRIVATE BLOG The default blog is public so all you do is change it to private and only invite your friends to view your blog.  (1) To setup your blog you first need to be a member of the RRDi by registering with just your email address.  (2) Go to Blogs and look for the CREATE A BLOG green button: (3) Look for the ONLY MEMBERS I CHOOSE CAN READ THIS BLOG radio button: Then click continue to setup your blog. If you need assistance, use the Invision Community help center or use the RRDi support center (only available for members of the RRDi). 
    • Related ArticlesThe Decrease of Demodex Density After Nd:YAG Laser Application for Facial Telengiactasias: A Case Report. Dermatol Ther. 2020 Jul 30;: Authors: Yalici-Armagan B, Elcin G PMID: 32734702 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesAcute inflammatory Demodex-induced pustulosis in an immunocompetent patient related to topical steroid use. Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Jul 29;: Authors: Guzman AK, Gittler JK, Amin B, Srikantha R, Balagula Y Abstract Demodex spp. mites are a common colonizer of sebaceous adult skin. Though usually clinically insignificant, demodicosis may be associated with a wide spectrum of skin diseases in immunocompetent hosts, such as erythematotelangiectatic and papulopustular rosacea, Demodex folliculorum, and blepharitis. We present a case of a healthy 9-year-old boy with an exuberant, inflammatory, Demodex-associated pustular eruption of the face, induced by the use of a high-potency topical steroid and successfully treated with oral ivermectin. PMID: 32729151 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesThe versatility of azelaic acid in dermatology. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020 Jul 30;:1-31 Authors: Searle T, Ali FR, Al-Niaimi F Abstract Azelaic acid has numerous pharmacological uses in dermatology. Its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties are thought to correlate with its efficacy in papulopustular rosacea and acne vulgaris, amongst other cutaneous conditions. We conducted a review of the literature on the use of azelaic acid in dermatology using key terms "acne," "azelaic acid," "dermatology," "melasma," "rosacea," searching databases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed. Only articles in English were chosen. The level of evidence was evaluated and selected accordingly listing the studies with the highest level of evidence first using the Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine 2011 guidance.This review found the strongest evidence supporting the use of azelaic acid in rosacea, followed by its use off-label in melasma followed by acne vulgaris. Weaker evidence is currently available to support the use of azelaic acid in several other conditions such as hidradenitis suppurativa, keratosis pilaris and male androgenic alopecia.Azelaic acid, as a monotherapy or in combination, could be an effective first-line or alternative treatment, which is well-tolerated and safe for a range of dermatological conditions. PMID: 32730109 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesA hypothesis: Role of physical factors in pathophysiology of rhinophyma - Focus on habitual mechanical trauma. Med Hypotheses. 2020 Jul 15;143:110097 Authors: Borzęcki A, Turska M Abstract BACKGROUND: Rhinophyma is a skin disorder which causes nose enlargement and deformation due to proliferation of sebaceous glands and connective tissue. It is not only an aesthetic problem but may also lead to impaired nasal breathing and problems with liquids intake. HYPOTHESIS: Although rhinophyma is considered to be a subtype of rosacea, here we hypothesise whether it is a separate disease with mechanical trauma as a main reason of the disease progress. METHODS: 22 patients with diagnosed rhinophyma were qualified for the study. All patients were physically examined and detailed patients' medical history was obtained. Patients were asked to answer a number of questions regarding their usual skin care, purification procedure as well as handling of the nose and nasal cavity. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: Due to our observations there is a group of patients who have never presented any typical symptoms of rosacea while they are now suffering from rhinophymatous changes. Most of those patients confirmed longlasting mechanical nose cleaning which included any skin lesions removal by squeezing and nose picking which resulted in local skin inflammation, swelling, pain or itching. CONCLUSION: It is suspected that many different factors may induce rhinophyma development. In our opinion, mechanical repetitive trauma is one of the most important. Therefore we encourage physicians to include adequate questions while taking medical history from the patient and implement proper recommendations for nasal care as soon as possible. PMID: 32721796 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related ArticlesEfficacy of non-ablative fractional 1440-nm laser therapy for treatment of facial acne scars in patients with rosacea: a prospective, interventional study. Lasers Med Sci. 2020 Jul 27;: Authors: Wang B, Deng YX, Yan S, Xie HF, Li J, Jian D Abstract Acne scarring is one of the most common facial skin disorders. The appropriate treatments for acne scars in patients with rosacea have not been studied. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of non-ablative fractional 1440-nm laser (1440-nm NAFL) therapy for treatment of atrophic acne scars in patients with rosacea. In this prospective, interventional study, 32 patients with rosacea and acne scars underwent three sessions of 1440-nm NAFL therapy. Therapy efficacy, epidermal barrier function, and side effects were evaluated. Thirty patients completed and the median acne scar scores significantly reduced from 45 (30, 50) to 15 (15, 30) after three treatments (P < 0.001). The improvement score of acne scars was 2.7 ± 0.7; 22 (73.3%) were satisfied or highly satisfied. The rosacea erythema scores changed from 2.1 ± 0.4 to 1.9 ± 0.5 (P = 0.326), and flushing, burning, and stinging were not worse. The oil content after treatments was significantly reduced (P < 0.001), while there was no significant difference in other indicators of skin barrier function. The quality-of-life score decreased from 17.5 ± 3.8 to 14.1 ± 3.0 (P < 0.001). No serious side effects were observed. The 1440-nm NAFL therapy is effective in the treatment of acne scaring in patients with rosacea with little damage to the skin barrier. PMID: 32719961 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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