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  • Posts

    • Abstract
      In dermatology probiotic microorganisms have primarily been used orally for the prophylaxis and treatment of atopic disorders. In contrast to the successes achieved for gastrointestinal disorders, positive effects for atopic dermatitis only have been found in a few studies. New insights could now fundamentally change the impact of probiotics on dermatology. Probiotics are - like microflora of the skin - non-pathogenic microbes, which do not induce inflammatory responses in the skin. Common pathways for probiotics, non-pathogenic microbes, and microflora are characterized, in order to facilitate their more effective therapeutic use. These microbes display a majority of their effects directly at the site of application and thereby induce natural defense mechanisms. However, promotion of immunological tolerance is just as important in producing positive effects. Tolerance of the resident flora on surface organs developed during evolution and the mechanisms of action are multifaceted. Therefore, the topical application of probiotics and non-pathogenic microbes for prophylaxis and therapy of overwhelming cutaneous pro-inflammatory immune reactions is very promising. Results of recent clinical trials already have demonstrated the efficacy of this new therapeutic concept. Hautarzt. 2009 Oct;60(10):795-801. doi: 10.1007/s00105-009-1755-8.
      Outside-in. Probiotic topical agents.
      Volz T, Biedermann T.
    • Abstract
      INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE:
      Normal human skin can produce a range of antimicrobial chemicals that play an important part in eliminating potential cutaneous pathogens. Lactobacillus plantarum is a gram-positive bacteria that produces antimicrobial peptides, which when applied to the skin can act like an anti-inflammatory as well as enhance the antimicrobial properties of the skin. Clinical studies were conducted to determine the effect of lactobacillus extract on improvement of skin barrier and reduction of erythema from chemical irritant, skin microflora, and acne. Results show that lactobacillus extract was effective in reducing skin erythema, repairing skin barrier, and reducing skin microflora, thereby exhibiting an effective reduction in acne lesion size and erythema at 5%, but not at 1%.
      CONCLUSION:
      Based on the results of these studies, lactobacillus extract (5%) can be used to treat mild acne lesions. J Cosmet Sci. 2012 Nov-Dec;63(6):385-95.
      Physiological effect of a probiotic on skin.
      Muizzuddin N, Maher W, Sullivan M, Schnittger S, Mammone T.
    • Related Articles Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Hypnotherapy and Skin Disorders. Am J Clin Hypn. 2018 Jul;61(1):34-44 Authors: Shenefelt PD Abstract
      Mindfulness-based cognitive hypnotherapy integrates mindfulness, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and hypnotherapy to improve physical, emotional, mental, and/or spiritual aspects of skin disorders. Meditation, including mindfulness meditation, and hypnosis both utilize trance phenomena to help produce focalization and specific improvements in skin disorders through psycho-neuro-endocrine-immunologic mechanisms. Hypnosis, cognitive hypnotherapy, focused meditation, and mindfulness meditation are discussed with respect to improving various skin disorders including acne, acne excoriée, alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis, congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, dyshidrotic dermatitis, erythema nodosum, erythromelalgia, furuncles, glossodynia, herpes simplex, hyperhidrosis, ichthyosis vulgaris, lichen planus, neurodermatitis, nummular dermatitis, postherpetic neuralgia, prurigo nodularis, pruritus, psoriasis, rosacea, trichotillomania, urticaria, verruca vulgaris, and vitiligo. Their integration into mindfulness-based cognitive hypnotherapy is then discussed and illustrated with improvement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.
      PMID: 29771216 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Assessment of rosacea symptom severity by genome-wide association study and expression analysis highlights immuno-inflammatory and skin pigmentation genes. Hum Mol Genet. 2018 May 16;: Authors: Aponte JL, Chiano MN, Yerges-Armstrong LM, Hinds DA, Tian C, Gupta A, Guo C, Fraser DJ, Freudenberg JM, Rajpal DK, Ehm MG, Waterworth DM Abstract
      Rosacea is a common, chronic skin disease of variable severity with limited treatment options. The cause of rosacea is unknown, but it is believed to be due to a combination of hereditary and environmental factors. Little is known about the genetics of the disease. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of rosacea symptom severity with data from 73,265 research participants of European ancestry from the 23andMe customer base. Seven loci had variants associated with rosacea at the genome-wide significance level (p≤5 × 10-8). Further analyses highlighted likely gene regions or effector genes including IRF4 (p=1.5 × 10-17), an HLA region flanked by PSMB9 and HLA-DMB (p=2.2 × 10-15), HERC2-OCA2 (p=4.2 × 10-12), SLC45A2 (p=1.7 × 10-10), IL13 (p=2.8 × 10-09), a region flanked by NRXN3 and DIO2 (p=4.1 × 10-9), and a region flanked by OVOL1and SNX32 (p=1.2 × 10-8). All associations with rosacea were novel except for the HLA locus. Two of these loci (HERC-OCA2, SLC45A2) and another precedented variant (rs1805007 in MC1R) with an association p value just below the significance threshold (p=1.3 × 10-7) have been previously associated with skin phenotypes and pigmentation, two of these loci are linked to immuno-inflammation phenotypes (IL13, PSMB9-HLA-DMA) and one has been associated with both categories (IRF4). Genes within three loci (PSMB9-HLA-DMA, HERC-OCA2, and NRX3-DIO2) were differentially expressed in a previously published clinical rosacea transcriptomics study that compared lesional to non-lesional samples. The identified loci provide specificity of inflammatory mechanisms in rosacea, and identify potential pathways for therapeutic intervention.
      PMID: 29771307 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • TEAE percentage rate is low with oxymetazoline treatment for rosacea. For more information. 
    • A new acronym, TEAE [Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events], has been published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,  in an article entitled, "Sustained Use of Oxymetazoline Cream Efficacious for Rosacea," according to MPR, about a study on the long-term safety (1 year) and efficacy of oxymetazoline cream 1.0% in 440 patients with rosacea spear headed by Zoe Diana Draelos, MD, who volunteers on the RRDi MAC. The study concluded: "This long-term study demonstrated sustained safety, tolerability, and efficacy of oxymetazoline for moderate-to-severe persistent erythema of rosacea." "The rate of discontinuation mostly due to application-site TEAEs was 3.2%" So the TEAE is low with oxymetazoline treatment for rosacea. 
    • Treatment for rosacea depends on the severity, but often requires some detective work to figure out your triggers as well as a carefully selected skin-care plan, including prescription and over-the-counter products. Some people may benefit from antibiotics, medications that specifically target redness, or isotretinoin (Accutane). For others, just keeping an eye on their triggers can have a profound impact.
      But the piece that tends to get overlooked in all of this is the mental health toll of dealing with a new skin condition—especially one that really has no cure. Below, we spoke with 11 people who have rosacea about how they were diagnosed, how they deal with their symptoms, and what they want others to know about the condition. 11 People Describe What It's Really Like to Have Rosacea, Sarah Jacoby, SELF
    • "For instance, at 28, I had what I thought was stubborn acne for a few years. I went all out in the drugstore aisle with harsh, drying products that ended up doing more harm than good. So when I was finally diagnosed with rosacea this past December, I was actually relieved. I assumed that having an answer would make it easier to treat."  Sarah Jacoby, Senior Health News Editor at SELF, who stated the above quote in her article, 11 People Describe What It's Really Like to Have Rosacea.  SELF Masthead • Twitter • Muck Rack • Refinery29 • Linkedin
    • image courtesy of Wikipedia Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala. Wikipedia Comparing Essential Oils with Metronidazole and Mercury Oxide in Killing Mites (with emphasis upon Salvia Hispanic) Abstract
      Demodex belong to the smallest mites: the average length of adults is 250 μm. Up to now, two Demodex species have been described, which are specific for humans: Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis. A medical condition caused by presence of Demodexis called demodicosis. Gao et al. in 2005 reported good effects of tea tree oil on Demodex sp. in the in vitro and in vivo settings. Aim of this study was to check survivability of Demodex mites in various substances. Tests were made with the use of the most common substances used in demodicosis treatment, i.e. metronidazole and mercury oxide. The effects of essential oils from tea tree, sea buckthorn, aloe, salvia, peppermint, camphor tree, fennel, eucalyptus, and lavender were tested as well. For controls, Demodex were placed in saline. The mean survival time of Demodex was 64 hours for metronidazole, and 46 hours – for 2.5% mercury oxide. Much better results were obtained with 50% tea tree oil (7 minutes), peppermint oil (11 minutes) and salvia oil (7 minutes).  Research Gate, December 2014
      Effect of Metronidazol, Mercury Oxide and Essentials Oils on the in vitro survivability of Demodex mites.
      Aleksandra Sedzikowska,Maciej Oseka, B. Grytner-Zięcina, Emilia Jaremko ---------------------------------------------------------------- Abstract
      Demodicosis is a medical condition caused by presence of Demodex mites. Mites may cause ocular demodicosis with symptoms such as burning and itching of eyelids. Currently, several drugs are available for the treatment of demodicosis. However, their use carries a risk of serious side effects. According to recent studies, substances contained in some plant-derived essential oils kill Demodex mites. Good efficacy of tea tree oil against Demodex sp. has been reported. However, some patients develop allergic reactions and ocular irritation in the course of tea tree oil treatment. Tests with essential oils showed that salvia and peppermint oils rapidly kill Demodex-in 7 and 11 minutes, respectively. Salvia is known as a valuable herb and is used to treat eye disease. Therefore, salvia essential oil could be an alternative treatment for demodicosis. J Bacteriol Parasitol, 2015, Volume 6. Issue 3.
      Impact of Salvia and Peppermint Oil on the In Vitro Survival of Demodex Mites (PDF)
      Aleksandra Sędzikowska, Maciej Osęka , Beata Roman3and Emilia Jaremko.
      Department of General Biology and Parasitology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. Ofta Ltd., ul. Mleczna 8, 03-667 Warsaw, Poland, Verco Sp. z o.o., Warsaw, Poland.
    • We learned about the Rositta Method in June 2012 at this thread at RF and it was a mystery how she treated rosacea patients for a long time. However, Conf posted [post no 109 11th May 2018 07:10 PM] an article published March 14, 2018 in Beauty Journaal (translated from Dutch) that describes her method of extracting demodex mite eggs and her complete treatment. You may watch this video below if you understand Dutch: 
    • Related Articles A case report of granulomatous rosacea of the face. Singapore Med J. 2018 Apr;59(4):228-229 Authors: Kok WL, Oon HH, Giam YC PMID: 29748691 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • What Dr. Kluk and I both thought interesting was your comment about rosacea. It’s very possible that you don’t have it, but as Dr Kluk told me: "Rosacea is very misunderstood as a condition, and it’s very common. If you google it, you’re going to get quite graphic photos of people with extreme redness, rough and broken skin, that sort of thing, but that is a very advanced kind of rosacea. There are much subtler, less pervasive forms of rosacea, and just because you have a less aggressive kind of rosacea now, it doesn’t mean it will become more like that at all. It’s possible to have rosacea without any textural changes to the skin." Dear Daniela: What Can I Do About My Red, Blotchy Skin?
      DANIELA MOROSINI, Refinery29
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