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    • The RRDi has been using Invision Community forum platform since 2004. When we started in 2004 it was recommended by Warren Stuart who was the assistant director of the RRDi to use what was then called Invision Power Services (later the name was changed to Invision Community). It is a powerful platform with many add-on features and a significant number of developers adding plugins and additional features to the platform. However, with the advent of mobile devices and social media platforms the trend has focused on mobile apps using iOS and Android devices found in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. The popularity of using these apps over using a browser to view a website has increased the use of social media platforms such as Reddit, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. The developers and owners of the Invision Community platform have now announced beta versions of iOS and Android apps for their platform which has been embedded for years using only a web browser, so we have announced with this post here asking for volunteers to download the beta versions and help test these new apps. Please consider volunteering and using these beta versions of the apps.  Invision Community Clients There are some significant clients who use Invision Community as their platform which you can see below:  Medical Clients Who Use Invision Community Platform
    • Amelioration of Compound 48/80-Mediated Itch and LL-37-Induced Inflammation by a Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide. Front Immunol. 2020;11:559589 Authors: Dondalska A, Rönnberg E, Ma H, Pålsson SA, Magnusdottir E, Gao T, Adam L, Lerner EA, Nilsson G, Lagerström M, Spetz AL Abstract Numerous inflammatory skin disorders display a high prevalence of itch. The Mas-related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2) has been shown to modulate itch by inducing non-IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and the release of endogenous inducers of pruritus. Various substances collectively known as basic secretagogues, which include inflammatory peptides and certain drugs, can trigger MRGPRX2 and thereby induce pseudo-allergic reactions characterized by histamine and protease release as well as inflammation. Here, we investigated the capacity of an immunomodulatory single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssON) to modulate IgE-independent mast cell degranulation and, more specifically, its ability to inhibit the basic secretagogues compound 48/80 (C48/80)-and LL-37 in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of ssON on MRGPRX2 activation in vitro by measuring degranulation in a human mast cell line (LAD2) and calcium influx in MRGPRX2-transfected HEK293 cells. To determine the effect of ssON on itch, we performed behavioral studies in established mouse models and collected skin biopsies for histological analysis. Additionally, with the use of a rosacea mouse model and RT-qPCR, we investigated the effect on ssON on LL-37-induced inflammation. We reveal that both mast cell degranulation and calcium influx in MRGPRX2 transfected HEK293 cells, induced by the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the basic secretagogue C48/80, are effectively inhibited by ssON in a dose-dependent manner. Further, ssON demonstrates a capability to inhibit LL-37 and C48/80 activation in vivo in two mouse models. We show that intradermal injection of ssON in mice is able to block itch induced via C48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. Histological staining revealed that ssON inhibits acute mast cell degranulation in murine skin treated with C48/80. Lastly, we show that ssON treatment ameliorates LL-37-induced inflammation in a rosacea mouse model. Since there is a need for new therapeutics targeting non-IgE-mediated activation of mast cells, ssON could be used as a prospective drug candidate to resolve itch and inflammation in certain dermatoses. PMID: 33101278 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • * Artificially Sweetened Drinks "Records for 104,760 participants were included....Artificially sweetened beverages were defined as those containing non-nutritive sweeteners. Sugary drinks consisted of all beverages containing 5% or more sugar....Researchers looked at first incident cases of cardiovascular disease during follow-up from 2009-2019, which were defined as stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and angioplasty. After excluding the first three years of follow-up to account for potential reverse causality bias, 1,379 participants had first incident cases of cardiovascular disease. Compared to non-consumers, both higher consumers of sugary drinks and of artificially sweetened beverages had higher risks of first incident cardiovascular disease, after taking into account a wide range of confounding factors..." Artificially sweetened drinks may not be heart healthier than sugary drinks, Medical Xpress, October 27, 2020, research letter in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology,  Sugar Any Better? "Drinking one or more sugary beverages a day was associated with a nearly 20% greater likelihood of women having a cardiovascular disease compared to women who rarely or never drank sugary beverages, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association." California study finds drinking sugary drinks daily may be linked to higher risk of CVD in women, Medical Xpress, May 13, 2020, by American Heart Association Research on Sugar Beverages Triggering Rosacea Do you think it is possible for a non profit organization for rosacea get its members to each donate one dollar to investigate whether or not sugar beverages or artificially sweetened drinks are a rosacea trigger in a double blind, placebo controlled, peer reviewed clinical study? It would take approximately 10K members to do this if the members wanted this. What do you think? Have you noticed whether drinking a sugar beverage triggers your rosacea? *Image credit CCO public domain
    • 13 Variants of Rosacea The RRDi recognizes these thirteen variants of rosacea:  Demodectic Rosacea  Gastrointestinal Rosacea [GR], aka, Gut Rosacea Glandular Rosacea  Granulomatous Rosacea Halogen rosacea  Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma (IFAG)  Neurogenic Rosacea  Pyoderma Faciale  Rosacea Conglobata  Rosacea Fulminans  Rosacea Lymphedema (Morbihan Disease) Rosacea Perioral Dermatitis [RPD] Steroid Rosacea [Facial corticosteroid addictive dermatitis] (FCAD) Etcetera Variant vs Subtype vs Phenotype
    • A new article on the pathophysiology of rosacea overlaps with demodectic rosacea and the phenotype classification. Below are the three highlights considered in the paper:  (1) New hypotheses to explain how Demodex mites may control host immunity, by analogy with what happens in tumor pathology: inducing tolerogenic dendritic cells through their Tn Ag, and diverting the body's defence reaction by exploiting the immunosuppressive properties of VEGF;  (2) Leading to consider rosacea not as a disease of the innate immunity, but as a chronicle infection by Demodex with T cell exhaustion; Highlighting of the ambiguities of the current definition of rosacea of the NRS, and the overlap with demodicoses, suggesting that all these dermatoses are different phenotypes of the same disease; (3) The suggestion, for the dermatologists, to learn to detect the demodicoses among the patients with persistent erythema, in the aim to treat at least these patients with topical acaricidal treatment. The article concludes, "The interactions among VEGF, Demodex, and the immune system need further exploration and the nosology of rosacea would then need to be adapted accordingly. The effectiveness of treating any patient with ETR first with an acaricidal cream needs to be assessed in prospective controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Currently, learning to distinguish patients with pityriasis folliculorum from those with isolated ETR is crucial so that they can be managed appropriately with an acaricidal cream." [1] [1] Forton, F.M.N. The Pathogenic Role of Demodex Mites in Rosacea: A Potential Therapeutic Target Already in Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea?. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb) (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13555-020-00458-9 Image courtesy of Dermatology and Therapy
    • The Pathogenic Role of Demodex Mites in Rosacea: A Potential Therapeutic Target Already in Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea? Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2020 Oct 23;: Authors: Forton FMN Abstract Rosacea is a common facial dermatosis but its definition and classification are still unclear, especially in terms of its links with demodicosis. Triggers of rosacea (ultraviolet light, heat, spicy foods, alcohol, stress, microbes) are currently considered to induce a cascading innate and then adaptive immune response that gets out of control. Recent histological and biochemical studies support the concept that this inflammatory response is a continuum, already present from the onset of the disease, even when no clinical signs of inflammation are visible. The Demodex mite is beginning to be accepted as one of the triggers of this inflammatory cascade, and its proliferation as a marker of rosacea; moreover, the papulopustules of rosacea can be effectively treated with topical acaricidal agents. Demodex proliferation appears to be a continuum process in rosacea, and may not be clinically visible at the onset of the disease. Molecular studies suggest that Demodex may induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and collaborate with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to induce T cell exhaustion and favor its own proliferation. These interactions among VEGF, Demodex, and immunity need to be explored further and the nosology of rosacea adapted accordingly. However, treating early rosacea, with only clinically visible vascular symptoms, with an acaricide may decrease early inflammation, limit potential flare-ups following laser treatment, and prevent the ultimate development of the papulopustules of rosacea. The effectiveness of this approach needs to be confirmed by prospective controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Currently, the evidence suggests that patients with only vascular symptoms of rosacea should be carefully examined for the presence of follicular scales as signs of Demodex overgrowth or pityriasis folliculorum so that these patients, at least, can be treated early with an acaricidal cream. PMID: 33095403 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article More in Demodectic Rosacea
    • "Fake news" in dermatology. Results from an observational, cross-sectional study. Int J Dermatol. 2020 Oct 23;: Authors: Iglesias-Puzas Á, Conde-Taboada A, Aranegui-Arteaga B, López-Bran E Abstract BACKGROUND: Social networks have become a means for disseminating information on health-related matters. OBJECTIVE: Describe the characteristics and analyze the accuracy of the dermatology content that is most often shared on the most popular social networks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The content most often shared on social networks (Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Reddit) between March 2019 and March 2020 was analyzed using the keywords: acne, alopecia/hair loss, psoriasis, eczema, melanoma, skin cancer, rash, and rosacea. The total number of interactions, skin disease, topic, and origin was collected from each of the records. The content was analyzed and was categorized as precise, confusing, or imprecise based on the scientific evidence available. RESULTS: A total of 385 websites were included. About 44.7% of the shared content was rated as imprecise, 20% as confusing, and 35.3% as precise. The records classified as imprecise obtained a higher mean number of interactions (P < 0.05). No differences were found in terms of the level of certainty and the dermatosis studied, whereas they did exist in relation to their topic and origin (P < 0.001). Of the contents classified as imprecise, the most frequent topic and origin were "alternative medicines" and "individual opinions, articles not affiliated with health institutions, nor peer reviewed," respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the contents often shared on social networks are below acceptable quality standards. Strategies are needed to discredit imprecise information and promote the dissemination of evidence-based dermatology information. PMID: 33095467 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article This article is referenced in the post, What is the Butterfly Effect in Rosacea?
    • Volunteer Beta Testers Needed! Note: We have applied our community forum with Invision Community to list us under EDUCATION and we are still awaiting approval. As soon as we have been approved we will announce it and you should see the RRDi Member Forum listed along with the others.  We are pleased to announce that a new mobile app is available in beta version for Android (for Apple devices using iOS you need to scroll further down). You can find it on the Google Play store. It is the Invision COMMUNITIES app (not the Invision Community app which is for admins ONLY). Ditto, confusing, so, hopefully you won't download the wrong one. Here is a screen shot in the Google Play Store which is the second one called Invision COMMUNITIES:  We have listed our community, the RRDi, and you should be able to find it once we are listed in the beta version. Please let us know your experience with this new app on your mobile device?   The iOS version is still in beta testing. You can volunteer and be a beta tester if you follow the steps: 
    • The Pro-Differentiation Effect of Doxycycline on Human SZ95 Sebocytes. Dermatology. 2020 Oct 22;:1-5 Authors: Zouboulis CC, Ní Raghallaigh S, Schmitz G, Powell FC Abstract BACKGROUND: Despite their widespread clinical use in both acne vulgaris and rosacea, the effects of tetracyclines on sebocytes have not been investigated until now. Sebaceous glands are central to the pathogenesis of acne and may be important in the development of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of doxycycline on the immortalized SZ95 sebaceous gland cell line as a model for understanding possible effectiveness on the sebaceous glands in vivo. METHODS: The effects of doxycycline on SZ95 sebocyte numbers, viability, and lipid content as well as its effects on the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ, in comparison to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist troglitazone, were investigated. RESULTS: Doxycycline reduced the cell number and increased the lipid content of SZ95 sebocytes in vitro after 2 days of treatment. These doxycycline effects may be explained by an upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA levels at 12 and 24 h, whereas troglitazone already upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ levels after 6 h. Both compounds did not influence peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α mRNA levels. CONCLUSION: These new findings illustrate a previously unknown effect of doxycycline on sebocytes, which may be relevant to their modulation of disorders of the pilosebaceous unit, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. PMID: 33091909 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Granulomatous Rosacea in Korean Patients: Diagnosis Based on Combining Clinical and Histological Findings. Dermatology. 2020 Oct 22;:1-5 Authors: Yang JH, Cho SI, Suh DH Abstract BACKGROUND: Granulomatous rosacea (GR) is a rare inflammatory skin disease, which is considered a variant of rosacea, apart from other types of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to summarize the characteristics of Korean patients diagnosed with GR by combining clinical and histological findings. METHODS: Fifteen cases, both clinically and histologically consistent with GR, were selected and were subsequently analyzed to describe clinical and histological characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 20 patients showed granulomatous infiltration in skin biopsies, but only 15 of them were clinically consistent with GR. Five patients who showed granulomatous inflammation were clinically consistent with erythematotelangiectatic or papulopustular rosacea. Among 15 patients, 13 (86.7%) were female and 2 (13.3%) were male. The most frequently involved area was the cheek, and none of the patients showed extrafacial lesions. There seems to be a possibility that treatment duration may be associated with the treatment response. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms clinical characteristics of GR based on the diagnosis combining both clinical and histological findings. PMID: 33091912 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • As of this date there are at least 80 systemic comorbidities listed associated with rosacea. Can you find anywhere on the internet a list like this?  That is what the RRDi is about, 'everything rosacea.' We attempt to have on one website a comprehensive database of 'everything rosacea.' Can you find all the information on rosacea at the other non profit organizations for rosacea?  Why not browse the other non profit organizations for rosacea and see if they even come close to all the data we have categorized into logical categories for your investigative research into rosacea?  Do they have the data you are finding on the RRDi website about rosacea even comes close to what you have discovered here on this website?  For example, do they even mention non prescription treatments for rosacea such as over the counter topicals and allowing REVIEWS of these treatments?  Or why not go to your favorite rosacea social media platform like on Reddit, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and see if you can logically figure out how to search for a subject you are investigating. Difficult task, isn't it? If you appreciate the data found on our website, why not volunteer and support the RRDi?  Could you at least donate one dollar so we can keep this website running?
    • Systemic Comorbidities in Korean Patients with Rosacea: Results from a Multi-Institutional Case-Control Study. J Clin Med. 2020 Oct 17;9(10): Authors: Woo YR, Kim HS, Lee SH, Ju HJ, Bae JM, Cho SH, Lee JD Abstract Recent evidence links rosacea to systemic disease, but there are not enough methodologic studies addressing this association in Asians. Our aim was to identify rosacea comorbidities in Koreans and establish a reference database. A multi-center, case-control study was performed where a total of 12,936 rosacea patients and 12,936 age- and sex-matched control subjects were identified from 2007 to 2018. Logistic regression was performed to find significant association between rosacea and Sjögren syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-3.00), systemic sclerosis (OR 6.56; 95% CI, 1.50-28.7), rheumatoid arthritis (OR 1.72; 95% CI, 1.50-1.98), ankylosing spondylitis (OR 2.32; 95% CI, 1.42-3.84), autoimmune thyroiditis (OR 1.96; 95% CI, 1.40-2.73), alopecia areata (OR 1.77; 95% CI, 1.27-2.45), vitiligo (OR 1.90; 95% CI, 1.30-2.77), lung cancer (OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.06-2.21), hepatobiliary cancer (OR 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.77), alcohol abuse (OR 1.59; 95% CI, 1.05-2.39), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.11; 95% 1.02-1.19), obesity (OR 1.72; 95% CI, 1.22-2.41), allergic rhinitis (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.54-1.76), allergic conjunctivitis (OR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.27-1.94), chronic rhinosinusitis (OR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14-1.42), herpes infection (OR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.53-1.86), and human papillomavirus infection (OR 2.50; 95% CI, 2.06-3.02). Higher odds for Sjogren syndrome, systemic sclerosis, ankylosing spondylitis, thyroiditis, vitiligo, hepatobiliary cancer, and obesity was exclusive in female subjects with rosacea, whereas increased prevalence of alopecia areata and alcohol abuse was confined to men. Only those who were 50 years and older exhibited higher odds for vitiligo, lung cancer, and gastroesophageal reflux disease while individuals younger than 50 were exclusively associated with hepatobiliary cancer, allergic conjunctivitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. Our study suggests that Koreans with rosacea are more likely to experience systemic comorbidity. Clinicians should acknowledge these interrelations and employ comprehensive care with an individual-based approach. PMID: 33080929 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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