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  • Posts

    • Rod102988 reports, "A year ago this time I was diagnosed with Rosacea due to heavy drinking and long bouts in the sun. I was devastated, depressed and embarrassed. I quit several jobs, tried makeup, turmeric, eating healthy, water etc. You know name it. I spent hundreds on products for up to a year. I even tried Finacea which while it helped the bumps not so much with the redness plus my insurance didn't cover it and it cost $330 a tube. Finally, I did tons of research online and found two products which I use in combination and they only cost a combined $80 on Amazon.  1) La roche Posay Rosaliac AR Intense. It's a visible redness reducing serum made by scientists in France. It's light and has no smell. You apply twice a day after washing.  2) GIGI Bioplasma Azaleic Acid 15 percent cream. This stuff is better than Finacea IMO and much much cheaper. It tackles all the same things as Finacea; redness, blemishes, acne and hyperpigmenation. Now what I do is usually is place both on at the same time but always one significantly less than the other....only on the problems spots. For example, a full dot full of one and miniscule dot full of the other. But, some may get irritated by that I wouldn't suggest starting off like that. In would initially alternate with one each day and then maybe alternate throughout the day. With that said, this cream and serum has worked wonders and its only costing me $80 bucks a month but I could really stretch both to a month and a half of I want to. After using these for 3 months I am amazed and these combination have been a complete and utter life saver."
    • Found this post at healthboard.com:  "My husband and I both have rosacea. We have used Metrogel daily for years and sometimes it would keep the rosacea under control and other times it would not.
      I researched home remedies and this is what has worked for both of us. We no longer have to go to the dermatologist for an Rx for Metrogel. Please note that this is NOT a cure. We do this daily and then we have no recurrence of the rosacea. When I stopped using it, the rosacea would return after a few weeks. I purchased a 12 ounce bottle of baby shampoo. It doesn't matter what brand as long as it is not too runny like water. Then I bought a 1 ounce bottle of 100% tea tree oil at Trader Joes. It doesn't matter where you buy your bottle of 100% tea tree oil. I poured about 1/3 of the 1 ounce bottle of tea tree oil into the 12 ounce bottle of baby shampoo. I then closed the cap of the baby shampoo and shook it really well.  In the beginning when my rosacea was prevalent, every morning I would put some of the tea tree oil infused baby shampoo on those areas. I would leave it on while I brushed my teeth. I tried to keep it on for at least 5 minutes. Then I would rinse it off. That evening I would do it again and keep it on for at least 5 minutes. Then rinse off. After a few days I saw my rosacea disappear. When I stopped this treatment, the rosacea would ultimately return. So now to keep my rosacea from returning I put on the tea tree oil infused baby shampoo every morning while I brush my teeth. I no longer need to put it on at night as the once daily application has kept my rosacea from returning. It is has been well over a year since the rosacea has resurfaced.  My husband still continues to put his application of tea tree oil infused baby shampoo on twice a day because he gets good results and he doesn't want to chance it returning as his rosacea was far worse than mine. This daily regime has worked for both my husband and I. If you choose to try this, I hope it works for you as well." This probably would help improve demodectic rosacea. 
    • Related Articles An empirically generated responder definition for rosacea treatment. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2017;10:347-352 Authors: Staedtler G, Shakery K, Endrikat J, Nkulikiyinka R, Gerlinger C Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to empirically generate a responder definition for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea.
      METHODS: A total of 8 multicenter clinical studies on patients with papulopustular facial rosacea were analyzed. All patients were treated with azelaic acid and/or comparator treatments. The severity of rosacea was described by the Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) and the number of lesions. Patients with the IGA score of "clear/minimal" were considered as responders, and those staying in the range of IGA "mild to severe" as nonresponders. The respective number of lesions was determined.
      RESULTS: A total of 2,748 patients providing 12,410 measurements were included. After treatment, responders showed 2.23±2.48 lesions (median 2 lesions [0-3]), and nonresponders showed 13.74±10.40 lesions (median 12 lesions [6-18]). The optimal cutoff point between both groups was 5.69 lesions.
      CONCLUSION: The calculated cutoff point of 5.69 lesions allows discrimination of responders (5 or less remaining lesions) and nonresponders (6 or more remaining lesions) of therapeutic interventions in rosacea.
      PMID: 28932125 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • The relationship between migraine and rosacea: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Cephalalgia. 2017 Jan 01;:333102417731777 Authors: Christensen CE, Andersen FS, Wienholtz N, Egeberg A, Thyssen JP, Ashina M Abstract
      Objective To systematically review the association between migraine and rosacea. Background Migraine is a complex disorder with episodes of headache, nausea, photo- and phonophobia. Rosacea is an inflammatory skin condition with flushing, erythema, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules. Both are chronic disorders with exacerbations of symptoms almost exclusively in areas innervated by the trigeminal nerve. Previous studies found an association between these disorders. We review these findings, provide a meta-analysis, and discuss possible pathophysiological commonalities. Methods A search through PubMed and EMBASE was undertaken for studies investigating the association between all forms of migraine and rosacea published until November 2016, and meta-analysis of eligible studies. Results Nine studies on eight populations were identified. Studies differed in methodology and diagnostic process, but all investigated co-occurrence of migraine and rosacea. Four studies were eligible for meta-analysis, resulting in a pooled odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.41-2.72) for migraine in a rosacea population compared to a non-rosacea population. Conclusion Our meta-analysis confirmed an association in occurrence of migraine and rosacea. Future studies should specifically investigate possible shared pathophysiological mechanisms between the two disorders.
      PMID: 28920449 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • A recently published paper concluded, "Expert groups and evidence-based guidelines agree that topical retinoids should be considered the foundation of acne therapy." So this article explains the increased use of retinoids by physicians over antibiotics since there is concern over antibiotic resistance. This article states, "The use of retinoids plus BPO targets multiple pathways and can often eliminate the need for antibiotics, reducing the likelihood of antibiotic resistance."

      Isotretinoin is just one of the several retinoids used to treat acne. The retinoids mentioned in the article are, "adapalene 0.1% and 0.3%; tazarotene 0.1%; tretinoin 0.01%, 0.025%, 0.038%, 0.04%, 0.05%, 0.08%, and 0.1% in the USA; isotretinoin 0.05% and 0.1% in other regions of the world" and reviews "the evidence supporting why retinoids should be considered the foundation of acne therapy (with a focus on topical retinoids)." The article states, "Both dermatologists and other physicians were less likely to prescribe a retinoid for patients aged 19 or older compared to those aged 10–19." The topical retinoids mentioned in this article are a "fixed combination adapalene 0.3%-benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% (0.3 A/BPO; Epiduo Forte®, Galderma Laboratories) and topical retinoids (adapalene, tazarotene, or tretinoin) and Retinoids are also available in fixed-combination formulations with BPO [adapalene-BPO 0.1%/2.5% and 0.3%/2.5% (Epiduo® and Epiduo Forte®, Galderma Laboratories)] and clindamycin [tretinoin 0.025%/clindamycin phosphate 1.2% (Veltin, Aqua Pharmaceuticals; Ziana®, Valeant Pharmaceuticals)]."

      The article does address the concern of "retinoid irritation" and offers "Strategies to minimize tolerability issues" in Table 1 but does not mention anything about long term risks of 'accutane induced rosacea' which many in RF and other anecdotal reports have confirmed happens to some.  Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2017 Sep; 7(3): 293–304.
      Published online 2017 Jun 5. doi:  10.1007/s13555-017-0185-2
      PMCID: PMC5574737
      Why Topical Retinoids Are Mainstay of Therapy for Acne
      James Leyden, Linda Stein-Gold, and Jonathan Weiss
    • sepi takes "half teaspoon fine chili powder and I mix it with about 15g face cream" and reports it works for rosacea. Read her report. 
    • "...the results of a pooled analysis of four Galderma-sponsored studies evaluating the use of topical therapies for the treatment of inflammatory papules and pustules of rosacea were presented at the 26th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress in Geneva, Switzerland. The success of rosacea treatment is usually defined as a score of 1 ('almost clear') or 0 ('clear') on the 5-point Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) scale. The new analysis reports that rosacea patients who achieve 'clear' (IGA 0), not only experience a more complete reduction in inflammatory lesions compared with patients who achieve 'almost clear' (IGA 1), but also an extended time to relapse that is associated with improved quality of life." ‘CLEAR’ (IGA 0) ROSACEA PATIENTS EXPERIENCE A DELAYED TIME TO RELAPSE, Lausanne, Switzerland – September 16, 2017 Galderma: 'Clear' (IGA 0) Rosacea Patients Experience a Delayed Time to Relapse
      PR Newswire
       Sep. 16, 2017
    • Is Sugar Addictive? There are reputable sources who say it is and those who say it is is not. I have collected the sources who say it is along with the those who say sugar is not addictive (scroll down). You be the judge.  Sources Who Say Sugar is Addictive "Our findings clearly demonstrate that intense sweetness can surpass cocaine reward, even in drug-sensitized and -addicted individuals. We speculate that the addictive potential of intense sweetness results from an inborn hypersensitivity to sweet tastants. In most mammals, including rats and humans, sweet receptors evolved in ancestral environments poor in sugars and are thus not adapted to high concentrations of sweet tastants. The supranormal stimulation of these receptors by sugar-rich diets, such as those now widely available in modern societies, would generate a supranormal reward signal in the brain, with the potential to override self-control mechanisms and thus to lead to addiction." Intense Sweetness Surpasses Cocaine Reward
      Magalie Lenoi , Fuschia Serre, Lauriane Cantin, Serge H. Ahmed 
      Plos One "Sugar is addictive. And we don’t mean addictive in that way that people talk about delicious foods. We mean addictive, literally, in the same way as drugs. And the food industry is doing everything it can to keep us hooked." Sugar Season. It’s Everywhere, and Addictive.
      By JAMES J. DiNICOLANTONIO and SEAN C. LUCANDEC. 22, 2014, New York Times "Withdrawal from a “sugar-rich” diet is associated with behavior suggestive of “withdrawal” symptoms." Diabetes 2016 Jul; 65(7): 1797-1799.
      Is Sugar Addictive?
      George A. Bray "Sugar addiction happens due to intense cravings for sweet food. It is triggered by the brain by sending signals to the receptors in our tongue that were not able to develop from the low-sugar diets of our ancestors" The Truth About Sugar Addiction
      By Dr. Mercola,  "The biological robustness in the neural substrates of sugar and sweet reward may be sufficient to explain why many people can have difficultly to control the consumption of foods high in sugar when continuously exposed to them." Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2013 Jul;16(4):434-9. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0b013e328361c8b8.
      Sugar addiction: pushing the drug-sugar analogy to the limit.
      Ahmed SH, Guillem K, Vandaele Y. "In animals, it’s a “no-brainer.” Dr. Nicole Avena of Columbia University exposes rats to sugar water in an excess-deprivation paradigm for three weeks, and they demonstrate all the criteria needed to diagnose addiction: binging, withdrawal, craving, and addiction transfer (when you’re addicted to one substance, you’re addicted to others as well)." The Sugar-Addiction Taboo
      When can you call a food addictive?
      ROBERT H. LUSTIG, The Atlantic  "In animal studies, sugar has been found to produce more symptoms than is required to be considered an addictive substance. Animal data has shown significant overlap between the consumption of added sugars and drug-like effects, including bingeing, craving, tolerance, withdrawal, cross-sensitisation, cross-tolerance, cross-dependence, reward and opioid effects. Sugar addiction seems to be dependence to the natural endogenous opioids that get released upon sugar intake. In both animals and humans, the evidence in the literature shows substantial parallels and overlap between drugs of abuse and sugar, from the standpoint of brain neurochemistry as well as behaviour." Sugar addiction: is it real? A narrative review
      James J DiNicolantonio, James H O'Keefe, William L Wilson
      British Journal of Sports Medicine  "In an interview with Lisa Mullins from Here & Now, Dr. DiNicolantonio further stated that some studies on rats show that sugar is potentially more addictive that cocaine because even after being hooked on cocaine, they invariably switch to sugar when it is introduced to them." Sugar Addiction: Facts And Figures
      AddictionResource "Your brain also sees sugar as a reward, which makes you keep wanting more of it. If you often eat a lot of sugar, you're reinforcing that reward, which can make it tough to break the habit." Slideshow: The Truth About Sugar Addiction
      WebMD "So drugs and sugar both activate the same reward system in the brain, causing the release of dopamine." Fact or fiction – is sugar addictive?
      TheConversation "The link between sugar and addictive behavior is tied to the fact that, when we eat sugar, opioids and dopamine are released." Experts Agree: Sugar Might Be as Addictive as Cocaine
      Written by Anna Schaefer and Kareem Yasin, healthline "Scientists have found that sugar is addictive and stimulates the same pleasure centers of the brain as cocaine or heroin. Just like those hard-core drugs, getting off sugar leads to withdrawal and cravings, requiring an actual detox process to wean off." Are You Addicted to Sugar? Here’s How to Break the Cycle, by Sarah Elizabeth Richards, Daily Burn, Life "While it is true that sugary foods can stimulate the same part of the brain responsible for pleasure and reward, as do many illicit substances, there are reasons other than addiction that eating could be linked with the reward area of the brain." Is sugar addictive?
      CSU External Relations Staff "Despite the anecdotal reports of people who claim to be addicted to sugar, and seemingly endless Web sites devoted to sugar addiction," says Cynthia Bartok, associate director for the Center for Childhood Obesity Research in Penn State's College of Health and Human Development, "modern science has not yet validated that idea." "However, 'yet' may be the key word," Bartok adds. "It was once thought of as pseudoscience, but a whole field of research has sprung out of the idea that food components such as sugar or fat may have some similarities to addictive drugs." Probing Question: Is sugar addictive?
      Lisa Duchene, Penn State "But the study inadvertently highlights an important truth: Anything that provides pleasure (or relieves stress) can be the focus of an addiction, the strength of which depends not on the inherent power of the stimulus but on the individual's relationship with it, which in turn depends on various factors, including his personality, circumstances, values, tastes, and preferences. As Peele and other critics of neurological reductionism have been pointing out for many years, the reality of addiction lies not in patterns of brain activity but in the lived experience of the addict." Research Shows Cocaine And Heroin Are Less Addictive Than Oreos, Jacob Sullum, Forbes "The evidence supports the hypothesis that under certain circumstances rats can become sugar dependent. This may translate to some human conditions as suggested by the literature on eating disorders and obesity." Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
      Volume 32, Issue 1, 2008, Pages 20-39
      Evidence for sugar addiction: Behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake
      Nicole M. Avena, Pedro Rada, Bartley G. Hoebel "For many years, studies have demonstrated that sugar triggers the brain’s pleasure and reward centers—areas in the emotional centers of the brain responsible for the release of “feel good” neurotransmitters called dopamine. These are the same brain areas stimulated by cocaine, nicotine, opiates (such as heroin and morphine), and alcohol. This addiction is not an imaginary thing in the minds of millions of sugar junkies—it’s associated with real physiological changes in the brain. And, perhaps because the brain’s pleasure areas are also very close to the pain centers, withdrawal from sugar has been described by many patients as being painful—like romantic pain or eliminating nicotine or caffeine." Sugar Addiction: Is It Real?
      By Dr. Phil Maffetone
      April 9, 2015, Fat-Burning Journal, Nutrition, MAF "According to Avena, when we eat sugar a signal is sent from the tongue to the cerebral cortex that activates a “rewards system.” This in turn encourages us to eat more. A huge part of the rewards system is the release of dopamine in our brain, which, when put into overdrive, can be pretty addictive." This Is Why You’re ‘Addicted’ To Sugar
      There’s a reason it feels so darn good.
      By Cate Matthews, Healthy Living, Huffpost "Speaking to the Guardian, DiNicolantonio said that the consumption of sugar was a grave concern. “In animals, it is actually more addictive than even cocaine, so sugar is pretty much probably the most consumed addictive substance around the world and it is wreaking havoc on our health.”  Is sugar really as addictive as cocaine? Scientists row over effect on body and brain, by Nicola Davis, theguardian "Studies show that sugar lights up the same exact area of our brain that is stimulated by drugs. For some people, the highs, lows and withdrawal from sugar can be just as powerful and dramatic as what a drug addict experiences." Sugar and Your Brain: Why Sugar Is So Very Addictive, 
      By: Rachel Gargano MS, RD, LDN, CSSD, Reboot with Joe "Sugar addiction should be treated like drug abuse, new research has revealed."
      Sugar addiction like drug abuse, study reveals, by  Nicola Harley, Telegraph "It is widely thought to affect the brain in a similar way to cocaine, and now a new study has suggested people addicted to sugar should be treated in the same way as other drug abusers." Sugar addiction 'should be treated as a form of drug abuse'
      by Matt Payton, Independent "Taubes surveys the admittedly sparse research on sugar's psychoactive effects. For example, researchers have found that eating sugar stimulates the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that is also released when consuming nicotine, cocaine, heroin, or alcohol. Researchers are still debating the question of whether or not sugar is, in some sense, addictive." Is Sugar an Addictive Poison?
      Hypothesis: More sugar causes both more diabetes and more obesity
      Ronald Bailey | January 6, 2017, reason.com "Research published in the Public Library of Science highlights a strange lab rat experiment involving sugar and cocaine. The rats were given cocaine until they became dependent on it. Then, researchers provided them a choice – the rats could continue to have the cocaine or they could switch to sugar. Guess which one the rodents chose? Yup, the sugar. 94% chose to make the switch. Even when they had to work hard to access the sugar, the rats were more interested in it than they were in the cocaine." Study Shows Sugar is More Addictive Than Cocaine!, David Wolfe Sources Who Say Sugar is Not Addictive "That is definitely a problem, but is not necessarily an addiction."

      Is Sugar Addiction?
      by Susan J. SMith, Ph.D, CDE, Visalia Medical Clinic "Most of the research they found on sugar addiction was done using mice or rats, and it’s not clear that these findings will translate perfectly to people." Everyone Calm Down for a Minute About ‘Sugar Addiction,’ Neuroscientists Plead
      By Melissa Dahl, Science of Us, NYMag "Given the lack of evidence supporting it, we argue against a premature incorporation of sugar addiction into the scientific literature and public policy recommendations." European Journal of Nutrition
      November 2016, Volume 55, Supplement 2, pp 55–69
      Sugar addiction: the state of the science
      Margaret L. WestwaterPaul C. FletcherHisham Ziauddeen "Prof Suzanne Dickson, of Gothenburg University and co-ordinator of the NeuroFAST project, said: "There has been a major debate over whether sugar is addictive.
      "There is currently very little evidence to support the idea that any ingredient, food item, additive or combination of ingredients has addictive properties." Sugar 'not addictive' says Edinburgh University study, 
      9 September 2014
      From the section Edinburgh, Fife & East Scotland, BBC "Sugary and high-fat food have both been shown to increase the expression of ΔFosB, an addiction biomarker, in the D1-type medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens; however, there is very little research on the synaptic plasticity from compulsive food consumption, a phenomenon which is known to be caused by ΔFosB overexpression." Food Addiction, Wikipedia
    • asmaa,  Thanks for posting, which is the best thing you can do. Public relations is a great place to post. What is your background? PR?  Tell us about your rosacea? 
    • hi all, hi brady  barrows as you know i am already member in the rosacea forum, and i would like to be an active member in this forum (RRDi) too, i received your e-mail and i am happy to participate. i need more details  to know how can i help thanks to all
    • Related Articles Painful subcutaneous nodules in a patch of livedo reticularis. Int J Dermatol. 2017 Mar;56(3):e44-e46 Authors: Barnes P, Chapman C, Fett N PMID: 27496315 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • Treatment of Rosacea With Concomitant Use of Topical Ivermectin 1% Cream and Brimonidine 0.33% Gel: A Randomized, Vehicle-controlled Study. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017 Sep 01;16(9):909-916 Authors: Gold LS, Papp K, Lynde C, Lain E, Gooderham M, Johnson S, Kerrouche N Abstract
      BACKGROUND: There is currently a lack of data on the simultaneous treatment of different features of rosacea. Individually, ivermectin 1% (IVM) cream and brimonidine 0.33% (BR) gel have demonstrated efficacy on inflammatory lesions and persistent erythema, respectively.
      OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy, safety, patient satisfaction, and optimal timing of administration of IVM associated with BR (IVM+BR) versus their vehicles in rosacea (investigator global assessment [IGA] ≥3).
      METHODS: Multicenter, randomized, double-blind study including subjects with rosacea characterized by moderate to severe persistent erythema and inflammatory lesions. The active treatment group included the IVM+BR/12 weeks subgroup (once-daily BR and once-daily IVM for 12 weeks), and the IVM+BR/8 weeks subgroup (once-daily BR vehicle for 4 weeks followed by once-daily BR for the remaining 8 weeks and once-daily IVM for 12 weeks). The vehicle group received once-daily BR vehicle and once-daily IVM vehicle for 12 weeks.
      RESULTS: The association showed superior efficacy (IGA success [clear/almost clear]) for erythema and inflammatory lesions in the total active group (combined active subgroups) compared to vehicle (55.8% vs. 36.8%, P=0.007) at week 12. The success rate increased from 32.7% to 61.2% at hour 0 and hour 3, respectively, in the IVM+BR/12 weeks subgroup, and from 28.3% to 50% in the IVM+BR/8 weeks subgroup. Reductions in erythema and inflammatory lesion counts confirmed the additive effect of BR to IVM treatment. Subjects reported greater improvement in the active subgroups than in the vehicle group, and similar rates for facial appearance satisfaction after the first 4 weeks of treatment in both active subgroups. All groups showed similar tolerability profiles.
      CONCLUSION: Concomitant administration of IVM cream with BR gel demonstrated good efficacy and safety, endorsing the comprehensive approach to this complex disease. Early introduction of BR, along with a complete daily skin care regimen may accelerate treatment success without impairing tolerability. <p><em>J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(9):909-916.</em></p>.
      PMID: 28915286 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
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