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  • Posts

    • Related Articles Role of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in patients with rosacea: a case-control study. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2018 Sep 23;: Authors: Akdogan N, Alli N, Incel Uysal P, Candar T Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Vitamin D has significant effects on the immune system and thereby on the pathogenesis of rosacea. However, there is a lack of information on the vitamin D status and vitamin D receptors (VDRs) of patients with rosacea.
      AIM: To evaluate the role of vitamin D in rosacea susceptibility.
      METHODS: A case-control study was conducted, enrolling patients with rosacea and healthy controls (HCs). Five VDR gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Cdx2, FokI, ApaI, BsmI and TaqI) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3 ] levels were compared between patients and HCs.
      RESULTS: The study enrolled 60 patients (M/F: 14/46) and 60 age- and sex-matched HCs (M/F: 14/46). Age (mean ± SD) was 48 ± 11 years for both groups. The serum 25(OH)D3 levels (median ± interquartile range) were higher in patients with rosacea (12.9 ± 6.8 ng/mL) than in HCs (10.5 ± 3.7 ng/mL) (P < 0.001). Subjects with high serum 25(OH)D3 levels had a 1.36-fold increased risk of rosacea (95% CI 1.17-1.58). Heterozygous and mutant ApaI polymorphisms increased rosacea risk by 5.26-fold (95% CI 1.51-18.35) and 3.69-fold (95% CI 1.19-11.48), respectively, whereas mutant TaqI polymorphisms decreased the risk by 4.69 times (95% CI 1.37-16.67). Heterozygosity for Cdx2 alleles increased rosacea risk, whereas wildtype ApaI and mutant TaqI alleles decreased it.
      CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that an increase in vitamin D levels may contribute to the development of rosacea. ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms, and heterozygous Cdx2, wildtype ApaI and mutant TaqI alleles were significantly associated with rosacea. These results indicate a possible role of vitamin D and VDR pathways in the pathogenesis of rosacea, although causality could not be assessed.
      PMID: 30246390 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Global Epidemiology and Clinical Spectrum of Rosacea, Highlighting Skin of Color: Review and Clinical Practice Experience. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Sep 18;: Authors: Alexis AF, Callender VD, Baldwin HE, Desai SR, Rendon MI, Taylor SC Abstract
      Among individuals with skin of color, rosacea has been reported less frequently than in those with white skin, but it is not a rare disease. In fact, rosacea may be underreported and underdiagnosed in populations with skin of color because of the difficulty of discerning erythema and telangiectasia in dark skin, as well as underestimation of the susceptibility of more highly pigmented skin to dermatologic conditions like rosacea whose triggers include sun exposure. Many people with skin of color who have rosacea may experience delayed diagnosis leading to inappropriate or inadequate treatment, greater morbidity, and uncontrolled, progressive disease with disfiguring manifestations, including phymatous rosacea. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rosacea in skin of color and highlights variations in the clinical presentation of rosacea across the diverse spectrum of patient populations affected. It presents strategies to aid in the timely diagnosis and effective treatment of rosacea in patients with skin of color, with an aim of promoting increased awareness of rosacea in these patients and reducing disparities in the management of their disease.
      PMID: 30240779 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Full Text The four components of this treatment are: (1) Dextran sulfate is an anionic polymer of sulfated glucose [1] Dextran sulfate contains approximately 17% sulfur which is equivalent to approximately 2.3 sulfate groups per glucosyl residue. [2]  (2) 4-t-butylcyclohexanol  [BCH; TRP-regulin ®] [3] (3) pongamia oil [4] (4) hesperidin methyl chalcone [HMC] [5] Some of the products mentioned in the above post, "Avène redness-relief cosmetic products for sensitive skin prone to redness" are:  
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Clean Redness-Relief Refreshing Cleansing Lotion
      Eau Thermale Avène Tolérance Extrême Emulsion
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Calm Soothing Repair Mask
      Eau Thermale Avène Xeracalm A.D Lipid-Replenishing Cleansing Oil
      Eau Thermale Avène Skin Recovery Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Cicalfate Restorative Skin Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Extremely Gentle Cleanser Lotion
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Dermo Cleansing Milk
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Day Redness Relief Soothing SPF 25 Cream
      Eau Thermale Avène Antirougeurs Fort Relief Concentrate End Notes  [1] Dextran Sulfate, Sodium Salt (CAS 9011-18-1), Santa Cruz Biotechnology [2] Dextran Sulfate, Sigma Aldrich, Millipore Sigma [3] PubChem, Sigma Aldrich, ChemSpider, Paula's Choice, Safety Data Sheet, Effective treatment for sensitive skin: 4-t-butylcyclohexanol and licochalcone A [4] derived from the seeds of the Millettia pinnata tree [5] Paula's Choice, Truth in Aging, Douglas Laboratories, 
    • Effects of dextran sulfate, 4-t-butylcyclohexanol, pongamia oil and hesperidin methyl chalcone on inflammatory and vascular responses implicated in rosacea. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2018;11:421-429 Authors: Hernandez-Pigeon H, Garidou L, Galliano MF, Delga H, Aries MF, Duplan H, Bessou-Touya S, Castex-Rizzi N Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a chronic facial skin disorder characterized by inflammation and vascular abnormalities. The pathophysiology of rosacea involves increased activation of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and cathelicidin LL-37, MMP-9, and KLKs. We evaluated the activity of four compounds (dextran sulfate, 4-t-butylcyclohexanol [BCH; TRP-regulin®], pongamia oil, and hesperidin methyl chalcone [HMC]) on inflammatory and vascular responses implicated in rosacea.
      Materials and methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of dextran sulfate was evaluated on PGE2 production after PMA stimulation of NCTC-2544 keratinocytes, and on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) after proinflammatory stimulation to mimic a rosacea environment. The anti-angiogenic activity of dextran sulfate was measured by analyzing pseudotube formation in co-cultured human microvascular endothelial cells/normal human dermal fibroblasts. HMC modulation of vascular responses and IL-8 cytokine production after SP stimulation was evaluated in human skin explants. We also assessed the effect of BCH on TRPV1 activation, and the effect of combined BCH and pongamia oil on the inflammatory response of NHEKs.
      Results: Dextran sulfate strongly and significantly inhibited PMA-induced PGE2 production, inhibited KLK5 and MMP-9 mRNA expression, and IL-8, IL-1α and VEGF production, and displayed a highly significant inhibitory effect on VEGF-induced pseudotube formation. In SP-stimulated human skin explants, HMC significantly decreased the proportion of dilated vessels, total vessel area, and IL-8 production. BCH significantly and dose-dependently inhibited TRPV1 activation, and BCH and pongamia oil inhibited CXCL1 and CXCL6 mRNA expression and IL-8 production in NHEKs. Combined BCH/pongamia oil inhibited IL-8 production synergistically.
      Conclusion: These in vitro results showed that dextran sulfate, BCH, pongamia oil and HMC, possess complementary soothing and anti-redness properties, supporting their combination in Avène redness-relief cosmetic products for sensitive skin prone to redness, and for topical adjunctive rosacea treatment.
      PMID: 30233225 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
    • One paper links Fungal keratitis associated with ocular rosacea
    • Related Articles Procedural management of rhinophyma: A comprehensive review. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2018 Sep 17;: Authors: Krausz AE, Goldberg DJ, Ciocon DH, Tinklepaugh AJ Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Rhinophyma is a cosmetically deforming disease characterized by nodular overgrowth of the lower 2/3 of the nose and is considered the end stage of acne rosacea.
      AIMS: Review the spectrum of procedural techniques for treatment of rhinophyma with a focus on the advantages and disadvantages of each modality.
      METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the search terms "rhinophyma," "treatment," and "surgery" in PubMed. Case reports, case series, and small retrospective trials using procedural techniques for management of rhinophyma were included for review. Animal studies, non-English articles, and reports of medical treatment of rhinophyma were excluded.
      RESULTS: There are currently no prospective, randomized controlled studies evaluating procedural management of rhinophyma. The most commonly employed treatments include scalpel excision, resection with heated knives, dermabrasion, electrosurgery and lasers, specifically carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG). The main complication associated with complete excision of rhinophymatous tissue is excessive scarring. To correct for this adverse effect, partial or tangential excision with preservation of underlying adnexal structures is now the accepted technique, irrespective of the chosen modality.
      CONCLUSION: There is no accepted gold standard for management of rhinophyma, and each modality succeeds in maintaining hemostasis, reducing scarring and achieving satisfactory cosmesis to different degrees. There is a conflicting data on the theoretical risk of recurrence with partial excision due to incomplete removal of tissue. Further studies evaluating this risk and alternate methods of prevention are required.
      PMID: 30225926 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Diagnostic Indicators of Rosacea and Demodicosis. Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Sep 18;: Authors: Forton FMN, De Maertelaer V Abstract
      Papulopustular rosacea and demodicosis are characterized by non-specific symptoms, which can make clinical diagnosis difficult. This retrospective study of 844 patients assessed the diagnostic importance of clinical signs and symptoms that are poorly recognized as being associated with these conditions. In addition to well-known signs (vascular signs (present in 80% of patients), papules (39%), pustules (22%) and ocular involvement (21%)), other signs and symptoms (discreet follicular scales (93%), scalp symptoms (pruritus, dandruff or folliculitis; 38%) and pruritus (15%)) may also suggest a diagnosis not only of demodicosis, but also of papulopustular rosacea. Facial Demodex densities (measured by 2 consecutive standardized skin biopsies) were higher when ocular or scalp involvement was present, suggesting more advanced disease, but further investigations are needed to confirm this hypothesis. Recognition of these clinical signs and symptoms should encourage dermatologists to perform a Demodex density test, thus enabling appropriate diagnosis to be made.
      PMID: 30226528 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles FINACEA™ (Azelaic Acid) Foam, 15. Skinmed. 2016;14(6):445-447 Authors: Gupta AK, Foley KA, Abramovits W PMID: 28031132 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Treatment of rhinophyma with the Versajet™ Hydrosurgery System and autologous cell suspension (ReCELL®): A case report. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2018 Apr;20(2):114-116 Authors: K Y, B R K, T D, E G Abstract
      This is a case report of a 63-year-old male patient who presented with rhinophyma of 17 years duration. Several medical treatments were applied previously, with no response or poor improvement. We present our experience by combining the Versajet™ Hydrosurgery System and ReCELL® in a heavy smoker patient, which led to a good aesthetic outcome. With the combined technique, we did not encounter any difficulties either within the operation or in the follow-up period. We obtained less complications and faster wound healing, which in return led to higher patient satisfaction.
      PMID: 28872937 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • Subtyping, phenotyping or endotyping rosacea: how can we improve disease understanding and patient care? Br J Dermatol. 2018 Sep;179(3):551-552 Authors: Thyssen JP PMID: 30222873 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • ElaineA [post no 3] reports trying this treatment and posts on September 14, 2018, "I am still clear at 7 months post oral treatment."
    • Related Articles Demodex blepharitis: clinical perspectives. Clin Optom (Auckl). 2018;10:57-63 Authors: Fromstein SR, Harthan JS, Patel J, Opitz DL Abstract
      Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two mites which infest the human eye and which may, in excess, lead to a wide range of anterior segment findings. Demodex mites have been implicated in anterior and posterior blepharitis, blepharoconjunctivitis, blepharokeratitis, and beyond. Due to significant overlap with other anterior segment conditions, Demodex infestation remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Definitive diagnosis can be made with lash sampling, and the most common mode of treatment is with tea tree oil in varying concentrations. This article summarizes elements of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management critical to clinical care of this common condition.
      PMID: 30214343 [PubMed] {url} = URL to article
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