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  • Posts

    • Prevalence of gastrointestinal comorbidities in rosacea: Comparison of subantimicrobial, modified release doxycycline versus conventional release doxycycline. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Feb;78(2):417-419 Authors: Lim HG, Fischer A, Rueda MJ, Kendall J, Kang S, Chien AL PMID: 29332715 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • crawfish18 (at RF) reports mixing zinc oxide 20% and Sulfur 10% in a 50/50% mix which crawfish18 says works for rosacea. 
    • Related Articles Inate immunity in rosacea. Langerhans cells, plasmacytoid dentritic cells, Toll-like receptors and inducible oxide nitric synthase (iNOS) expression in skin specimens: case-control study. Arch Dermatol Res. 2018 Jan 12;: Authors: Moura AKA, Guedes F, Rivitti-Machado MC, Sotto MN Abstract
      Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition with predominant facial involvement. Because of that, many patients sense that rosacea affects quality of life. The etiology of rosacea remains unknown. Recent studies have suggested that aberrant innate immunity is central to this disease. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of Langerhans cells, plasmacytoid dentritic cells (PDC), the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR) and inducible oxide nitric synthase (iNOS) in skin of patients with rosacea, to highlight the participation of innate immunity in its pathogenesis. 28 biopsy specimens were taken from patients with clinical and histopathological findings of rosacea. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Langerhans cells (anti-CD1a antibody), PDC (anti-CD 123 antibody), TLR2, TLR4 and iNOS was performed in skin samples and compared with normal skin controls. The expression of Langerhans cells was lower in rosacea group than in control group. PDC were found in skin samples of rosacea as isolated cells and forming small clusters. Expression of TLR2, TLR4 and iNOS was higher in rosacea samples than in normal skin controls. This research demonstrates early and late stage components of innate immunity in specimens of rosacea ratifying the existence of an altered innate immunity in its pathogenesis.
      PMID: 29330632 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Pivotal Trial of the Efficacy and Safety of Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for the Treatment of Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Findings from the First REVEAL Trial. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Jan 01;17(1):97-105 Authors: Kircik LH, DuBois J, Draelos ZD, Werschler P, Grande K, Cook-Bolden FE, Weng E, Berk DR, Ahluwalia G Abstract
      An unmet need exists for a safe, tolerable, effective treatment for moderate to severe persistent facial erythema in patients with rosacea. This pivotal phase 3, multicenter, double-blind study evaluated the efficacy and safety of topical oxymetazoline in patients with facial erythema associated with moderate to severe rosacea. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with oxymetazoline hydrochloride cream 1.0% or vehicle applied once daily for 29 days, and were followed for 28 days posttreatment. The primary efficacy outcome was having at least a 2-grade decrease from baseline on both the Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) and the Subject Self-Assessment for rosacea facial redness (SSA) scales (composite success) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose on day 29. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and posttreatment worsening of erythema (composite CEA/SSA increase of 1-grade severity from baseline; rebound effect). A total of 440 patients (mean age, 49.5 years; 78.9% females) were randomized (oxymetazoline, n=222; vehicle, n=218); most had moderate erythema. On day 29, significantly greater proportions of oxymetazoline recipients achieved the primary efficacy outcome at each time point (P less than 0.02) and overall (P less than 0.001) compared with vehicle recipients. The incidence of discontinuation due to TEAEs was low in both groups (oxymetazoline group, 1.8%; vehicle group, 0.5%). The most common TEAEs reported during the entire study period were application-site dermatitis, application-site erythema, and headache in the oxymetazoline group (1.4% each), and headache (0.9%) in the vehicle group. Following cessation of treatment, low proportions of patients experienced rebound effect (oxymetazoline group, 2.2%; vehicle group, 1.1%). Oxymetazoline applied to the face once daily for 29 days was effective, safe, and well tolerated in patients with moderate to severe persistent facial erythema of rosacea. <p><em>J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(1):97-105.</em></p>.
      PMID: 29320594 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Patients' self-esteem before and after chemical peeling procedure. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2017 Dec 29;:1-3 Authors: Anargyros K, Eftychia P, Christos C, Vasiliki E, Vasiliki M, Kaliopi A, Irene P, Dimitrios R, George K Abstract
      INTRODUCTION: Chemical peeling is a safe method, widely used to treat a variety of skin conditions and reduce the aging effects. This study aims to evaluate self-esteem among adolescents who undergo chemical peelings.
      MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty six patients constituted the study group. Sixty seven individuals had undergone chemical peeling for therapeutic reasons and 59 individuals for cosmetic reasons. To assess patients' self-esteem, the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) was used before and after treatment. The control group included 71 healthy, age- and sex-matched volunteers from the general population. They were also asked to complete the RSES, after the same time interval as the patients.
      RESULTS: The healthy controls (23.01 ± 3.12) presented statistically significantly higher self-esteem than both the groups of individuals who would be submitted to chemical peeling. Furthermore, patients who would undergo peeling for therapeutic reasons (21.58 ± 3.20) had statistically significantly higher self-esteem than those who would undergo the procedure for cosmetic reasons (18.97 ± 3.36). After the chemical peeling sessions, the self-esteem of patients treated for therapeutic reasons (23.48 ± 2.43) and of patients treated for cosmetic reasons (22.83 ± 3.34) improved statistically significantly, while the self-esteem of the healthy controls remained stable, as expected.
      CONCLUSION: Patients who undergo chemical peelings tend to have low levels of self-esteem. Although facial lesions in skin diseases such as acne, acne scars, rosacea, and melasma seem to have negative effect on individuals' self-consciousness, patients who would be submitted to chemical peeling in order to treat wrinkles, loss of radiance, and skin tone clarity have even lower self-esteem. Chemical peelings were shown to favorably affect patient's self-esteem since all patients showed an increase in self-esteem after treatment, while the control group experienced no change.
      PMID: 29286838 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Demodex and rosacea: Is there a relationship? Indian J Ophthalmol. 2018 Jan;66(1):36-38 Authors: Gonzalez-Hinojosa D, Jaime-Villalonga A, Aguilar-Montes G, Lammoglia-Ordiales L Abstract
      PURPOSE: The objective of the study is to compare the frequency of Demodex on the eyelash follicle of patients with rosacea and referents without rosacea or ophthalmological disorders.
      METHODS: This is a comparative, open, observational, and cross-sectional study that included 41 patients diagnosed with rosacea and 41 referents without rosacea diagnosis or ophthalmic alterations. The individuals underwent a slit-lamp examination in which two eyelashes per eyelid were removed with fine forceps. The presence of Demodex was sought by direct visualization under a light microscope. The results were expressed as "positive" when at least one mite on one lash was found and "negative" when no mite was identified. Chi-square test was used to compare the presence of mites in both groups.
      RESULTS: Eighty-two study individuals (45 females and 37 males) were included, of which 41 patients were diagnosed with rosacea and 41 were without rosacea or ophthalmic alterations. The average mean age was 37 years with a minimum of 19 and a maximum of 87 years. Of the 41 patients with rosacea, 31 had erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and 10 had papulopustular rosacea. There were no patients with phymatous or ocular rosacea. The presence of Demodex was found in 32 patients: 24 patients with rosacea diagnosis (16 of the erythematotelangiectatic subtype and 8 of papulopustular subtype) and 8 patients without rosacea or ophthalmic alterations (P ≤ 0.001).
      CONCLUSION: Rosacea was found to be a statistically significant risk factor for Demodex infestation in eyelashes, irrespective of age and sex, with a higher prevalence in papulopustular variety.
      PMID: 29283119 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Characterization of the facial microbiome in twins discordant for rosacea. Exp Dermatol. 2017 Dec 28;: Authors: Zaidi AK, Spaunhurst K, Sprockett D, Thomason Y, Mann MW, Fu P, Ammons C, Gerstenblith M, Tuttle MS, Popkin DL Abstract
      Previously, we determined that genetic and environmental factors contributed equally towards rosacea in twins. To assess an environmental factor, we characterized the malar cheek bacterial microbiome from twins discordant for rosacea. We found no significant difference in facial microbiome alpha and beta diversity between related twins discordant for rosacea. However, the relative percentage abundance of Gordonia and Geobacillus, low abundant genera, was positively and negatively associated with rosacea severity, respectively. Our data demonstrate a significant correlation between facial microbiome and severity of rosacea in genetically matched twins and importantly that overall microbiome composition is largely unchanged. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
      PMID: 29283459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • But dermatologists are highly against using the tools at home because they say the needles aren’t big enough to penetrate the proper holes into skin, so you’re essentially damaging your face for no reason. And without proper sterilization, derma rollers can harbor harmful bacteria causing infections, breakouts and can trigger skin conditions such as rosacea, which causes redness and bumps on the face; eczema, itchy inflammation spots; and melasma, brown patches on the skin. Derma Rollers are hot sellers, but the at-home microneedling tool can sometimes do more harm than good, by Jeanette Settembre, Moneyish
    • "Shauna Willetts, 24, was diagnosed with rosacea by a dermatologist two years ago. “My first winter living in New York City, I woke up one morning and my face was covered in red, irritated, puss-filled spots,” she tells SELF. “I've always had acne, but this was something I hadn't experienced before, and it took quite the toll on my confidence"....In these cases, some people with rosacea turn to makeup, in addition to prescription creams, to cover and treat the visible signs of a flare-up." How to Cover Up Redness With Makeup, by Jessica Cruel, SELF Forum Category > Cosmetics RRDi Store > Cosmetics
    • Rosacea. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 10 03;137(18): Authors: Huldt-Nystrøm T, Danielsen K, Li X, Stangeland KZ PMID: 28972327 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • "Researchers found that the risk for rosacea, as well as other skin disorders, such as atopic eczema and onychomycosis (toenail fungus), increased with the presence of systemic low-grade inflammation." Study Finds Association Between Low-Grade Inflammation and Rosacea, Samantha DiGrande, AJMC
    • Combination of platelet rich plasma in fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment increased clinical efficacy of for acne scar by enhancement of collagen production and modulation of laser-induced inflammation. Lasers Surg Med. 2017 Dec 20;: Authors: Min S, Yoon JY, Park SY, Moon J, Kwon HH, Suh DH Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) which contains large amounts of growth factors has been tried to enhance therapeutic efficacy of laser treatment for acne scar with unknown underlying mechanism.
      OBJECTIVES: The present study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism of increased clinical efficacy of PRP when combined with fractional laser treatment for treating acne scars.
      METHODS: Subjects with mild to moderate acne scars were treated with two sessions of fractional CO2 laser therapy given with and without co-administration of PRP. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained at baseline, 1, 3, 7, and 28 days for investigation of molecular profiles associated with skin changes produced by laser plus PRP treatment.
      RESULTS: The PRP treatment increased clinical efficacy with decreased severity of adverse effects such as erythema, swelling and oozing. Productions of TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 proteins were more highly elevated on the PRP-treated side of the face compared to the control side at day 28. Furthermore, PRP-treated side showed significant increase of c-myc, TIMP, and HGF expression. Experimental fibroblast culture model was also used. PRP administration after laser irradiation increased expressions of p-Akt, TGFβ1, TGFβ3, β-catenin, collagen 1, and collagen 3 in both dose-dependent and time dependent manners in fibroblast. Moreover, we acquired clinical and histological data through randomized control clinical trial.
      CONCLUSION: Taken together with human study results combined with the data from cell experiments we suggest that PRP treatment increased fibrogenetic molecules induced by fractional CO2 laser, which have association with clinical effect. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PMID: 29266290 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
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