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    • Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2021 Oct 18. doi: 10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Depression and anxiety are common among people with rosacea. However, the exact magnitude of the prevalence rate and odds ratios (ORs) for depression and anxiety, respectively, in rosacea patients is unclear, and no systematic review or meta-analysis of published data has yet been performed. We therefore performed as systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in rosacea patients. METHODS: We performed a systematic search of the PubMed, Embase and Medline databases for all observational studies published up to October 2020 that reported the prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. The primary outcome measures were prevalence rates and ORs for depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the I2 statistic. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup and meta-regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies involving 14,134,021 patients with rosacea were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of depression was 19.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.0-24.3%) and that of anxiety was 15.6% (95% CI 11.8-19.3%). The prevalence of depression and anxiety was significantly lower in studies using clinical criteria to diagnose depression and anxiety (9.2 and 10.2%, respectively) than in those studies using screening tools (26.2% [P < 0.01] and 22.7% [P = 0.03], respectively). The methodological quality of the included studies greatly contributed to the heterogeneity. Patients with rosacea were more likely to experience depression (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.79-2.72) and anxiety (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.56-3.44) than healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that patients with rosacea are at a higher risk of experiencing depression and anxiety. More efforts are warranted to recognize and manage depression and anxiety in patients with rosacea. PMID:34657997 | DOI:10.1007/s13555-021-00613-w {url} = URL to article
    • Postepy Dermatol Alergol. 2021 Aug;38(4):590-596. doi: 10.5114/ada.2021.108917. Epub 2021 Sep 17. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Inflammation, immune system disorders, Demodex infestation, neurovascular dysregulation and oxidative stress are thought to be contributory factors in the pathogenesis of rosacea. AIM: To evaluate the presence of Demodex mites, the morphologic features of the nailfold capillaries, and the systemic oxidative stress status in patients with rosacea. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed with rosacea and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects were included in this prospective case-control study. The presence of Demodex infestation, the findings of nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), and the status of systemic oxidative stress measured by total oxidant capacity (TOC), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and oxidative stress index (OSI) were evaluated. RESULTS: Demodex infestation rates were significantly higher in rosacea patients than in controls (p = 0.001). Increases in the diameters of the capillaries and the presence of avascular areas and crossing and abnormal structures were significantly more common in rosacea patients than in the healthy controls (p < 0.01, p = 0.016, p = 0.02, p < 0.001, respectively), and hairpin structures were significantly less common in rosacea patients than in the controls (p < 0.001). The presence of crossing capillaries was positively correlated with higher TOC levels (p = 0.05), while abnormal structures were found to be correlated with lower levels of TAC (p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative status and NFC may play diagnostic and prognostic roles in rosacea, which should be confirmed by studies with larger sample sizes. PMID:34658699 | PMC:PMC8501418 | DOI:10.5114/ada.2021.108917 {url} = URL to article
    • J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2021 Oct 17. doi: 10.1111/jdv.17758. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Few studies have investigated the relationship between rosacea and upper gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, with two studies reporting conflicting data that patients with rosacea are at higher risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).1, 2 Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate a potential relationship between rosacea and GI disorders with a focus on the upper GI tract defined as the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. PMID:34661953 | DOI:10.1111/jdv.17758 {url} = URL to article
    • Cureus. 2021 Aug 31;13(8):e17617. doi: 10.7759/cureus.17617. eCollection 2021 Aug. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The multifactorial nature of rosacea and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) pathogenesis complicates the achievement of satisfactory treatment outcomes. 13C urea breath test (UBT) has been identified as an accurate, non-invasive, and quick procedure to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with high sensitivity and specificity. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aim to assess the correlation between H. pylori infection and rosacea and CSU patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted on patients with rosacea and CSU in the dermatology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. History and physical examination were performed by a dermatologist. H. pylori 13C-UBT detection was performed in all subjects. RESULTS: In total, 114 patients were included in this current study, with 41 rosacea and 73 urticaria patients. The vast majority of our subjects were females (96.5%). The mean (±SD) age was 42.3 (±12.7). More than half (58.8%) of the examined samples were positive for 13C-UBT; however, positive results were significantly higher in the rosacea patients (73.2%) compared to the urticaria group (50.7%), with a p-value of 0.019. CONCLUSION: Our findings underline the significant association of H. pylori with rosacea and CSU regardless of the presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. We thus recommend the inclusion of H. pylori testing in the routine workup of CSU and rosacea patients. PMID:34646668 | PMC:PMC8483814 | DOI:10.7759/cureus.17617 {url} = URL to article
    • Acta Derm Venereol. 2021 Oct 13. doi: 10.2340/actadv.v101.356. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Rosacea, a chronic condition usually recognized by its visible presentation, can be accompanied by invisible symptoms, such as burning and stinging. This aim of this review is to gather the most recent evidence on burning and stinging, in order to further emphasize the need to address these symptoms. Inflammatory pathways can explain both the signs and symptoms of rosacea, but available treatments are still evaluated primarily on their ability to treat visible signs. Recent evidence also highlights the adverse impact of symptoms, particularly burning and stinging, on quality of life. Despite an increasing understanding of symptoms and their impact, the management of burning and stinging as part of rosacea treatment has not been widely investigated. Clinicians often underestimate the impact of these symptoms and do not routinely include them as part of management. Available therapies for rosacea have the potential to treat beyond signs, and improve burning and stinging symptoms in parallel. Further investigation is needed to better understand these benefits and to optimize the management of rosacea. PMID:34643244 | DOI:10.2340/actadv.v101.356 {url} = URL to article More Information on Burning and Stinging in Rosacea
    • If you have been diagnosed with Phenotype 5, it usually responds to treatment quite well. We have a list of treatment options to consider listed in this post which requires you join the RRDi as an active member to view. Have you been diagnosed with Phenotype 5? What 2 prescription treatments have you used?
    • Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2021 Oct 2;14:1393-1400. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S322876. eCollection 2021. ABSTRACT PURPOSE: Although acne vulgaris (AV) is a common disease and can persist into adulthood, there are few large-scale epidemiological studies on the prevalence of acne vulgaris in adults. The aim of our study was to characterise the epidemiology and comorbidity of acne vulgaris in working adults in Germany. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Within the framework of a cross-sectional study, a total of 161,269 employees underwent dermatological whole-body examinations in more than 500 German companies between 2001 and 2016. Point prevalence rates for acne vulgaris and further skin diseases and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated and differences between participants with and without acne vulgaris were tested with chi-squared tests. RESULTS: Mean age was 43.2 years ± 10.9, 55.5% were male. In total, n = 5311 people (3.3%) with acne vulgaris were identified. Prevalence decreased by age. Controlling for age and gender, acne was significantly associated with folliculitis (OR = 1.91; CI: 1.76-2.07), contact dermatitis (OR = 1.74; CI: 1.08-2.81), rosacea (OR = 1.74; CI: 1.40-2.15), pyoderma (OR = 1.58; 1.22-2.06), seborrheic dermatitis (OR = 1.47; CI: 1.27-1.71), hand eczema (OR = 1.34; CI: 1.00-1.76), verruca vulgaris plantaris (OR = 1.29; CI: 1.09-1.51), tinea pedis (OR = 1.27; CI: 1.10-1.47), spider veins (OR = 1.26; CI: 1.16-1.38) and telangiectasia (OR = 1.15; CI: 1.02-1.30). CONCLUSION: These data underline the importance of acne vulgaris in the adult population. Further studies to better understand the pathophysiology of AV and its comorbidity in different phases of adulthood would be desirable to develop appropriate guidelines and therapy concepts. PMID:34629884 | PMC:PMC8495148 | DOI:10.2147/CCID.S322876 {url} = URL to article
    • first you stop consuming alcohol completely and see the result after one month. I am not saying that alcohol is causing your rosacea getting worsen but Sometimes it happens that any trigger which causes flare-ups, if we consume them only once would immediately cause flare-ups. This is only to see whether alcohol is your trigger or not and please share your results.
    • Guest Jennifer
      I have rosacea on my nose.  I have had it for 3 years, with little notice, but now it is getting really bad with bigger pores and bumps getting bigger and bigger on top and sides of my nose.  I have taken the  2 prescription medications recommended with poor results.  I have had it scraped 1 time 2 years ago but it did nothing.  I have alcohol a couple times a month.  Does anyone know what can slow down the process on the nose please?
    • Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol (Engl Ed). 2021 Oct;96(10):556-560. doi: 10.1016/j.oftale.2020.07.008. Epub 2021 Sep 24. ABSTRACT Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma (IFAG) is a recently described and rare condition. It is considered a form of infantile granulomatous rosacea. IFAG with facial and eyelid nodules is very rare. A description is presented of three cases of IFAG eyelid nodules. They concern healthy children with no history of trauma. Biopsy examination revealed non-caseating inflammatory granulomas. Different medical treatments have been tried that seem to accelerate its healing, although its tendency is spontaneous resolution within several months. Painless recurrent eyelid nodules can be confused with chalazion. The diagnosis of IFAG should be considered in chronic eyelid nodules. PMID:34620487 | DOI:10.1016/j.oftale.2020.07.008 {url} = URL to article
    • Skin Appendage Disord. 2021 Aug;7(5):382-386. doi: 10.1159/000514565. Epub 2021 Apr 26. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Scalp rosacea is scarcely reported in the literature, but it is probably not uncommon. Trichoscopic findings have not been specifically established for this entity. CASE PRESENTATION: We report 4 cases of chronic scalp rosacea with trichoscopic evidence of peripilar scaling that resolved without scarring after treatment. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Chronic and persistent inflammation around the isthmus produced in scalp rosacea may form peripilar scaling resembling that found in lichen planopilaris. PMID:34604328 | PMC:PMC8436626 | DOI:10.1159/000514565 {url} = URL to article
    • Only little group study with 14 candidates will not suffice the result of alcohol consumption not as a risk factor in rosacea and we over and over say that every rosacea person has different triggers associated with them and depends on the the degree of alcohol consumption just like any other intake triggers.
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