Jump to content
  • Legal Disclaimer

     

    All use of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute (RRDi or irosacea.org) Web site is subject to the terms and conditions set forth below. When referring to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute (RRDi or irosacea.org) in this legal discaimer includes the following domains:

    irosacea.org
    rosaceans.com
    rrdinstitute.org
    rosacea-control.com
    rosacea-research-and-development-institute.org

    legal_disclaimer.png

    Any use of such Web pages constitutes the user's agreement to abide by the following terms and conditions.

    The Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is a non profit corporation in the state of Hawaii, USA recognized June 7, 2004 by USA Internal Revenue Service as a 501 (c) (3) non profit tax exempt organization.

    All medical information on this Web site has been reviewed for accuracy. However, the information posted here by the Rosacea Research & Development Institute or any third party should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace consultation with a qualified physician. The Institute does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case.

    Links to other Web sites found on irosacea.org are provided as a service to our users. Such linkage does not constitute endorsement of the site by the Rosacea Research & Development Institute, and the Institute is not responsible for the content of external web sites. Links to commercial rosacea web sites are prohibited at this time.

    The Rosacea Research & Development Institute Web pages are designed for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to substitute for informed medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified health care provider. The Rosacea Research & Development Institute does not endorse or attest to the validity or accuracy of any treatments or medications discussed herein. Before acting on any information contained on the Web pages, you agree that you will consult your health care provider to determine whether the information you are relying on is appropriate for your medical condition.

    All information provided by the Rosacea Research & Development Institute is owned by or licensed to the Rosacea Research & Development Institute. The Rosacea Research & Development Institute retains all proprietary rights to the information contained on the pages. Except for making one hard copy print of the information or downloading the material for a one-time use, information on the pages may not be reproduced, transmitted, distributed, or displayed, without the express consent of the Rosacea Research & Development Institute.

    THIS WEB SITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. THIS WEB SITE COULD INCLUDE TECHNICAL INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN; THESE CHANGES WILL BE INCORPORATED IN NEW EDITIONS OF THE WEB SITE. THE ROSACEA RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES TO THE PROGRAM(S) DESCRIBED IN THIS WEB SITE AT ANY TIME

    NOTICE AND TAKEDOWN PROCEDURES; COPYRIGHT AGENT

    The RRDi does not knowlingly use any material (images or text) that is copyrighted by others. If you believe any materials accessible on or from this web site infringe your copyright, you may request removal of those materials (or access thereto) from this web site by The RRDi copyright agent (identified below) and providing the following information:
    Identification of the copyrighted work that you believe to be infringed. Please describe the work, and where possible include a copy or the location (e.g., URL) of an authorized version of the work. Identification of the material that you believe to be infringing and its location. Please describe the material, and provide us with its URL or any other pertinent information that will allow us to locate the material. Your name, address, telephone number and (if available) e-mail address.
    A statement that you have a good faith belief that the complained of use of the materials is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law.
    A statement that the information that you have supplied is accurate, and indicating that "under penalty of perjury," you are the copyright owner or are authorized to act on the copyright owners behalf.

    A signature or the electronic equivalent from the copyright holder or authorized representative.

    The irosacea.org agent for copyright issues relating to this web site is as follows:

    Copyright Agent
    RRDi
    PO Box 235611
    Honolulu, Hawaii, 96823

    In an effort to protect the rights of copyright owners, the irosacea.org maintains a policy for the termination, in appropriate circumstances, of subscribers and account holders of this web site who are repeat infringers.

    International Disclaimer

    This Web site can be accessed from other countries around the world and may contain references to rosacea products, services, treatments or programs that have not been announced in your country. These references do not imply that irosacea.org intends to announce such products, services or programs in your country.

    Governing Law and Jurisdiction

    This web site (excluding linked sites) is controlled by irosacea.org from its office within the state of Hawaii, United States of America. By accessing this Web site, you and irosacea.org agree that all matters relating to your access to, or use of, this Web site shall be governed by the statutes and laws of the state of Hawaii, without regard to the conflicts of laws principles thereof. You and irosacea.org also agree and hereby submit to the exclusive personal jurisdiction and venue of the Superior Court of the District of Honolulu, Honolulu County and the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii with respect to such matters. irosacea.org makes no representation that materials on this Web site are appropriate or available for use in other locations, and accessing them from territories where their contents are illegal is prohibited. Those who choose to access this site from other locations do so on their own initiative and are responsible for compliance with local laws.

    Privacy Policy

    Our Privacy Policy is the commitment to respect the privacy of the information entrusted to our institute with your personal information by not giving your personal information to others or using it inappropriately. If you have any questions or concerns regarding our privacy policy please direct them to privacy@irosacea.org

    You may also send a letter to:

    Rosacea Research & Development Institute, PO Box 235611, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96823

    irosacea.org does not sell, exchange, or release your personal information (name, e-mail address, mailing address, credit card data, etc.) without your consent to any third parties.

    Information gathered through the use of cookies is not related to any personally identifiable details.

    What information does irosacea.org collect from our users and how do we collect it?

    irosacea.org only contacts individuals who specifically request that we do so. irosacea.org collects personally identifying information from our users during (1) online registration, (2) online public surveys, (3) online purchasing, and (4) messages posted to our public forum board and the private forum. Generally, this information includes name, e-mail address, postal address, and answers to public survey questions. This information is used for internal purposes and helps us determine how to continually improve our site and the institute. Names and email addresses may be posted in public forums and public databases by individual members who post such information on their own. The RRDi is not responsible if a member posts their own real name, address, phone number, or email address. If a member later regrets posting this information the member can report where the post is and have it removed upon request. If you do not want your name listed in any of the public surveys or databases you should use a bogus name or alias (nickname) since the institute is not responsible if you use your real name or email address in a public survey or database. However, the institute will not publicly display any of the members names, email addresses or postal addresses. Each member is responsible for his or her own privacy when using any of the institute's web site when posting. Non voting members can join the RRDi by providing an email address. 

    Members who donate to the RRDi are named in public financial records unless the donor specifically instructs us that the donation is anonymous.

    Corporate Members Forum Guidelines and Privacy Policy

    The corporate members only private forum is provided as a free service of the RRDi. Volunteers of the insitute spent hours working on this forum. The institute will not release any names, mailing addresses or email addresses of who is using this private forum to any third parties without your consent. Privacy is important to the RRDi and you can rest assured your contact information is safe with us and we will not disclose your contact info to anyone without your permission or only if we are required by law to disclose your contact info. The privacy policy also includes the Member Forum, Blog and Gallery areas of our site. The Guidelines policy is enforced and binding on all members and guests.

    Blog, Clubs and Gallery

    The Blog, Clubs and Gallery, if available, are provided as a free service by the RRDi to its members only and you are responsible for your own privacy with regard to this service if you engage with another member and disclose your private information in the Blog, Clubs or post photos in the Gallery. The RRDi cannot be held responsible for your privacy if you use the Blog, Clubs or Gallery and our privacy policy, legal disclaimer, rules, and official documents are still binding if you violate this policy.  We warn you to not disclose your private information or post inappropriate content in the Blog, Clubs or Gallery.

    The institute will not release any names or email addresses of who is using the Blog, Clubs or Gallery service without your consent.

    Cookies

    What are cookies and how do we use them?

    Cookies help track a person''s session while online. They are used on our site to gather basic tracking information. Cookies are not related to any personally identifiable information and are not used to retrieve information from your computer that was not originally sent in a cookie.

    Many browsers are set to accept cookies. You may prefer to set your browser to refuse cookies. It is possible, however, that some areas of the site will not function properly if you do so. This is especially likely when trying to order a publication.

    Third-Party Advertising

    Advertisements are not currently allowed on this site. If advertisements are allowed then information about your visits to this site, such as the number of times you have viewed an ad (but not your name, address, or other personal information), is used to serve ads to you. In the course of serving advertisements to this site, third-party advertisers may place or recognize unique cookies on your browser. Links to third-party advertising, or commercial web sites are prohibited.

    Amazon Affiliate

    The RRDi has joined Amazon Affiliates and links to items at amazon.com may be placed throughout the site. The RRDi receives a small fee for each item that is purchased by users who click on an item featured on our site.

    Demodex Solutions Affiliate

    The RRDi has joined the Demodex Solutions affiliate program and links to this program are placed throughout the site. The RRDi receives a small fee for each item that is purchased by users who click on an item featured on our site.

    Disclaimer

    This policy may be changed at any time at Rosacea Research & Development Institute's discretion.

    Copyright

    © Rosacea Research & Development Institute. All rights reserved. Reproduction, re-transmission or reprinting of the contents of this Web site, in part or in its entirety, is expressly prohibited without prior written permission from the Rosacea Research & Development Institute.

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      1,223
    • Most Online
      499

    Newest Member
    Beth
    Joined
  • Posts

    • Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2007;20:199–210  DOI:  10.1159/000101807  
      Beneficial Long-Term Effects of Combined Oral/Topical Antioxidant Treatment with the Carotenoids Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Human Skin: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study  
      P.  Palombo,  G. Fabrizi,  V. Ruocco, E. Ruocco, J. Fluhr, R. Roberts, P.  Morganti 
    • From 1998 through 2005 there was an incredible volunteer spirit that drove the formation of the RRDi. Since 2005 the force that motivated so many to bring together rosacea sufferers into a non profit organization has dwindled to just a flickering wick. Why is it that rosaceans (rosacea sufferers) don't volunteer anymore?  Andy Seth, an entrepreneur, has a blog post, The Way We Think About Volunteering Is Dead Wrong, states, "research shows that the happiest volunteers are those who give 2 hours per week. That’s it. 2 hours."   If the RRDi could get any rosacean to volunteer 2 hours a weeks, that would be miraculous. Are there volunteers who actually volunteer that many hours a week? There must be, otherwise the study is bogus. If we could get any RRDi member to just post their thought or experience with rosacea for 15 minutes a week that would be incredible. We have dotted the RRDi forum with requests to RRDi members to simply post anything and the 1200 plus members as of this date are simply miniscule when it comes to posting. Getting our members to post is a challenge. If you have some insight how to get our members to post, we are all ears. You can reply to this post and comment to your heart's content. Of course, that is the issue, the RRDi members' hearts are not content to post. Why is that? The research Mr. Seth referred to may have been the study commented on by the American Psychological Association that reports, "Volunteers lived longer than people who didn't volunteer if they reported altruistic values or a desire for social connections as the main reasons for wanting to volunteer, according to the study." This same study, Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis, the co-author concludes:  "It is reasonable for people to volunteer in part because of benefits to the self; however, our research implies that should these benefits to the self become the main motive for volunteering, they may not see those benefits."  One of the benefits is what is called 'helper's high' which has been scientifically confirmed. [1] Of course, if a RRDi member who has rosacea helps another rosacea sufferer that would be the basis for receiving the 'helper's high.' Rosaceans supporting rosaceans.  In trying to understand why volunteering amongst rosaceans has continued on this downward course, and googling this for an answer, The Guardian has an article about this subject and concluded, "But while the benefits of volunteering are clear, there is worrying evidence that the people who could benefit most from giving their time are precisely those least likely to be involved."  Volunteer Match (which the RRDi has joined) has an article on this subject and states that the Bureau of Labor Statistics Report shows "that volunteer rates have been steadily declining for over a decade," [2] and comments, "There’s an endless supply of reasons that could explain why volunteer rates are falling. Last year, upon seeing the results, VolunteerMatch President Greg Baldwin argued that volunteer rates are falling because we as a nation don’t invest enough resources in the nonprofit sector. Without resources, nonprofits simply don’t have the capacity to effectively engage volunteers. Someone in the comments of that post argued that the falling rates can be attributed to the fact that more people are overworked with less time on their hands. Others say people are simply lazier than they used to be. I personally think it could be attributed to a shifting trend away from community involvement, due to the emergence of online communities, young people moving more often, and other factors." [3] In the above article mentioned [3] there are a number of comments and I think Ron from Florida's [April 16, 2016] comment is insightful: 
      "When I was younger, volunteering and giving back was part of life. It was something that we did and didn’t think twice about it. I don’t see that same philosophy these days. It’s to the point that schools here require some level of community service to complete your graduation requirements." Stem Learning reports, "It is suggested that stagnating volunteer numbers and in some areas, reducing numbers of volunteers, along with cuts made by local authorities falling disproportionately upon the volunteering sector funding, suggests a potential fall in people volunteering per se. Furthermore the 2015/16 Community Life survey, highlighted 14.2 million people formally volunteered at least once a month in 2014/15 and although rates are mostly unchanged, it appears irregular volunteering appear to show a 5% drop!" Carey Nieuwhof lists 6 REASONS YOU'RE LOSING HIGH CAPACITY VOLUNTEERS. I don't see how those six reasons are related to the RRDi, but I am all ears to anyone who can point out to me what the RRDi isn't doing or not doing with regard to Carey's six reasons. Our page on volunteering covers most of what Carey is discussing.  Without a doubt this explains the situation. Any thoughts on this subject would be much appreciated.  Online Volunteering Dr. Natalie Hruska says that the studies indicating a drop in volunteering over the past decade "do not factor in kinds of volunteerism today, like virtual volunteering" and writes there is "a necessity to redefine what volunteerism is and how we understand it today." [4] End Notes [1] Helper's High: The Benefits (and Risks) of Altruism, Psychology Today [2] According to the 2015 report, 24.9% of the U.S. population over the age of 16 volunteered at least once in the past year. In 2011, this percentage was 26.8%, and in 2005 it was 28.8%. [3] The U.S. Volunteer Rate Is Still Dropping. Why?, Tess Srebro | March 25, 2016 | Industry Research | Engaging Volunteers, Volunteer Match [4] Dr. Natalie Hruska, April 12, 2016 POST to the article in end note 2. Dr. Hruska has a video below that discusses online volunteering:  Dr. Hruska has written a book on this subject, Managing the First Global Technology: Reflections on a relevant application of the Internet, in Kindle or Paperback. 
    • Dr. Ben Johnson, RRDi MAC Member, discusses a holistic approach to treating rosacea in an interview with Lori Crete, Licensed Esthetician, Spa 10. 
    • I had a mole on my forehead that I was told that 3% Hydrogen Peroxided might remove, so I dabbed a little on the mole and after some weeks it did indeed remove the mole. However, I noticed that the rosacea or seb derm on my forehead that was near the mole also cleared up. So I experimented and began putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on my red spots on my forehead and after some days they began to fade away too!  Since then I have been putting 3% Hydrogen Peroxide on all my facial rosacea red spots and letting it dry, then adding the ZZ cream, just before bed and this regimen seems to really work for me. I also have taking the Lutein/Zeazanthin 40 mg capsule each day. I also avoid sugar as much as possible and eat very low carbohydrate. 
    • An interesting article in The New York Times Magazine states, "Enough people reported good results that patients were continually lined up at Mesmer’s door waiting for the next session."  Dr. Mesmer is where the word mesmerize comes from. The article explains how 'double blind' placebo controlled clinical studies originated and why drug companies have to differentiate between a drug's actual pharmaceutical effect and the placebo effect. I particularly like this paragraph in the article: 

      "What if, Hall wonders, a treatment fails to work not because the drug and the individual are biochemically incompatible, but rather because in some people the drug interferes with the placebo response, which if properly used might reduce disease? Or conversely, what if the placebo response is, in people with a different variant, working against drug treatments, which would mean that a change in the psychosocial context could make the drug more effective? Everyone may respond to the clinical setting, but there is no reason to think that the response is always positive. According to Hall’s new way of thinking, the placebo effect is not just some constant to be subtracted from the drug effect but an intrinsic part of a complex interaction among genes, drugs and mind. And if she’s right, then one of the cornerstones of modern medicine — the placebo-controlled clinical trial — is deeply flawed."

      What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?, The New York Times Magazine
    • Rosacea Diet Triggers always come up in a discussion of rosacea. Just about every dermatologist parrots the NRS list of proposed rosacea diet triggers, especially physicians explain to their patients to avoid "spicy food and wine." There is a much longer trigger factor list that include other proposed food and drink triggers. An interesting read is Liver, Yogurt, Sour Cream, Cheese, Eggplant, and Spinach that discusses this subject. 

      There are some who can eat anything and their skin looks great. This is probably due to genetics. There is a theory that rosacea is genetic and we have simply been dealt with a bad set of rosacea prone genes. 

      Whether diet really does affect rosacea or acne, do you think that eating a diet with the proper proportion of protein, fat, carbohydrate and essential nutrients improves health? If a person has a poor diet without a proper proportion of the three food groups and lacks the essential nutrients, would that effect the skin?  

      The Rosacea Diet that I have proposed since 1999 you can obtain for free if you join the RRDi and mention when joining you want a free copy and explains in detail what to ingest and what to avoid for just 30 days to see if this improves your skin. Most rosacea sufferers will not do this because it means reducing your carbohydrate intake to 30 grams a day for 30 days, a task that very few are willing to undertake because sugar is addictive. Also due to a misunderstanding on what carbohydrate actually is, many think that carbohydrate is an essential nutrient which is far from the truth. The Rosacea Diet is simply a short test that clearly shows whether reducing carbohydrate for thirty days helps clear your skin. After this simple test one can modify carbohydrate intake according to one's individual situation and may be able to use this method to help control your rosacea, because in RF you will find that the majority will tell you that diet does indeed affect rosacea and acne. While there are a few who claim diet doesn't have anything to do with rosacea, these are definitely in the minority. It would be good to substantiate this in a poll, but the NRS has already done that with its survey asking what food and drink triggers your rosacea and came up with the 'official' diet trigger list which all the dermatologists parrot, namely 'spicy food and wine.' Did the NRS even mention sugar or carbohydrate in its poll?  No. The NRS avoids mentioning sugar or carbohydrate as a rosacea diet trigger. The RRDi does list sugar and carbohydrate as rosacea diet triggers. 
    • Related Articles [Not Available]. Prensa Med. 1946;6(2):10-2 Authors: VEINTEMILLA F, DEL CASTILLO H PMID: 20991596 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles [Not Available]. Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946 Jan;53:67 Authors: LENTZ JW PMID: 21065801 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] {url} = URL to article
    • Use of an Alternative Method to Evaluate Erythema Severity in a Clinical Trial: Difference in Vehicle Response With Evaluation of Baseline and Postdose Photographs for Effect of Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Erythema of Rosacea in a Phase 4 Study. Br J Dermatol. 2018 Nov 30;: Authors: Eichenfield LF, Del Rosso JQ, Tan JKL, Hebert AA, Webster GF, Harper J, Baldwin HE, Kircik LH, Stein-Gold L, Kaoukhov A, Alvandi N Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Once-daily topical oxymetazoline cream 1.0% significantly reduced persistent facial erythema of rosacea in trials requiring live, static patient assessments.
      OBJECTIVE: To critically evaluate the methodology of clinical trials that require live, static patient assessments by determining whether assessment of erythema is different when reference to the baseline photograph is allowed.
      METHODS: In two identically designed, randomised, phase 3 trials, adults with persistent facial erythema of rosacea applied oxymetazoline or vehicle once daily. This phase 4 study evaluated standardised digital facial photographs from the phase 3 trials to record ≥1-grade Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) improvement at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose.
      RESULTS: Among 835 patients (oxymetazoline n=415, vehicle n=420), significantly greater proportions of patients treated with oxymetazoline versus vehicle (P<0.0001) achieved ≥1-grade CEA improvement (up to 85.3% vs 29.8%). When reference to baseline photographs was allowed while evaluating posttreatment photographs, the results for oxymetazoline were similar to results of the phase 3 trials, but a significantly lower proportion of vehicle recipients achieved ≥1-grade CEA improvement (up to 52.3% vs 29.7%; P<0.001). Up to 80.2% of oxymetazoline patients achieved at least moderate erythema improvement, versus up to 22.9% of vehicle patients. The association between patients' satisfaction with facial skin redness and percentage of erythema improvement was statistically significant (Spearman rank correlation, 0.1824; P<0.0001 [oxymetazoline]; 0.0623; P=0.01 [vehicle]).
      CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of study photographs, with comparison to baseline, confirmed significant erythema reduction with oxymetazoline on the first day of application. Compared to the phase 3 trials results, significantly fewer vehicle recipients attained ≥1-grade CEA improvement, inferring a mitigated vehicle effect. This methodology may improve the accuracy of clinical trials evaluating erythema severity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
      PMID: 30500065 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Topical Oxymetazoline Cream 1.0% for Persistent Facial Erythema Associated With Rosacea: Pooled Analysis of the Two Phase 3, 29-Day, Randomized, Controlled REVEAL Trials J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Nov 01;17(11):1201-1208 Authors: Stein-Gold L, Kircik L, Draelos ZD, Werschler P, DuBois J, Lain E, Baumann L, Goldberg D, Kaufman J, Tanghetti E, Ahluwalia G, Alvandi N, Weng E, Berk D Abstract
      Background: Rosacea is a chronic dermatologic condition with limited treatment options. Methods: Data were pooled from two identically designed phase 3 trials. Patients with moderate to severe persistent erythema of rosacea were randomized to receive oxymetazoline cream 1.0% or vehicle once daily for 29 days and were followed for 28 days posttreatment. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients with ≥2-grade improvement from baseline on both Clinician Erythema Assessment (CEA) and Subject Self-Assessment (SSA) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours postdose, day 29. Results: The pooled population included 885 patients (78.8% female); 85.8% and 91.2% had moderate erythema based on CEA and SSA, respectively. The primary outcome was achieved by significantly more patients in the oxymetazoline than vehicle group (P<0.001). Individual CEA and SSA scores and reduction in facial erythema (digital image analysis) favored oxymetazoline over vehicle (P<0.001). The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was low (oxymetazoline, 16.4%; vehicle, 11.8%). No clinically relevant erythema worsening (based on CEA and SSA) was observed during the 28-day posttreatment follow-up period (oxymetazoline, 1.7%; vehicle, 0.6%). Conclusion: Oxymetazoline effectively reduced moderate to severe persistent facial erythema of rosacea and was well tolerated. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(11):1201-1208.
      PMID: 30500142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • Related Articles Rosacea-specific quality of life questionnaire: translation, cultural adaptation and validation for Brazilian Portuguese. An Bras Dermatol. 2018 Nov/Dec;93(6):836-842 Authors: Tannus FC, Picosse FR, Soares JM, Bagatin E Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Brazil does not have a rosacea-specific quality of life questionnaire.
      OBJECTIVES: translation into Brazilian Portuguese, development of cultural adaptation, and validation of the RosaQoL disease-specific questionnaire for rosacea of any subtype.
      METHODS: the recommended procedures for translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of an instrument were followed, and three interviews were conducted: baseline; seven to fourteen days after baseline; and at four to six months. The questionnaire was analyzed (with 95% confidence interval) for reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha); testretest reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient); responsiveness and validity.
      RESULTS: terms of the original questionnaire were replaced to guarantee cultural and semantic equivalence. Validity was demonstrated by expressive correlations between the RosaQoL domains and by significance in the Jonckheere-Terpstra test (p≤0.05) between the scores of the RosaQoL domains and the participants' self-perception in relation to the disease. Reliability was acceptable; alpha coefficient ranged from 0.923 to 0.916 in the first and second applications of the RosaQoL, respectively, and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.671 to 0.863 in the seven- to fourteen-day period. Responsiveness, measured by grouping participants into three categories based on self-perception of rosacea (better, worse or unchanged), was found for the "better" response group (p≤0.05).
      STUDY LIMITATIONS: small sample; limited variety of screening sources.
      CONCLUSIONS: RosaQoL-BR (Brazil) was demonstrated as a reliable, valid and responsive questionnaire, with limitations, for individuals with any subtype of rosacea.
      PMID: 30484528 [PubMed - in process] {url} = URL to article
    • Thanks Apurva Tathe for your tips. 
×