Jump to content
  • Demodectic Rosacea

    Demodectic Rosacea is a rosacea variant, just as valid a variant as Granulomatous Rosacea.

    Image of Demodex Folliculorum courtesy of National Geographic Demodex Folliculorum [1]

    The RRDi is the only non profit organization for rosacea that has officially recognized Demodectic Rosacea as a variant of rosacea. "Recently human primary demodicosis has been recognized as a primary disease sui generis and a clinical classification has been proposed. A secondary form of human demodicosis is mainly associated with systemic or local immunosuppression." [2] This is referring to a paper published in 2014 "to classify human demodicosis into a primary form and a secondary form." [3] While acknowledging the work of Dr. Chen and Dr. Plewig, whether you refer to demodicosis or demodectic rosacea we are referring to the same condition. The term 'demodectic rosacea' was coined by Dr. Plewig in an email to the RRDi on March 2, 2007 where Dr. Plewig wrote, "Concerning your questiones, demodicosis can be a disease by itself and thus being independent of rosacea. Or demodex mites heavily colonize pre-existing rosacea and thus lead to demodectic rosacea ( rosaceiform dermatosis). This is a rather complicated issue. Rosacea is usually diagnosed by inspection [of] the eye. Laboratory tests are rarely needed, for instance in gram-negative rosacea, where one needs bacteriology. The same is true for demodectic rosacea, where one has to demonstrate the mites in great numbers." [4] 

    Current concepts on rosacea is a video presentation by the Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin with Frank Powell, MD who interviews Fabienne Fortan, MD, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium explaining the latest information on demodectic rosacea:

    Demodetic Rosacea has a long history of controversy which continues to this day. For example, note the following quote:
    "From these and other statements it is seen that in suggesting the thought that these minute forms of life are etiological factors in even some of the phases of acneform diseases, I shall be but little in accord with the highest authorities. In antagonism to these views, I may say that the results of my observations appear to indicate a close relationship of the parasites with the diseased condition."
    Demodex Folliculorum in Diseased Conditions of the Human Face
    Proceedings of the American Society of Microscopists, Vol. 8, 1886, page 123, Published by: Wiley-Blackwell

    For a comprehensive article on demodectic rosacea and why it is considered a rosacea variant click here.

    Dr. Leyda Bowes discusses demodectic rosacea (demodicosis) in this short video: 

     

    If your dermatologist dismisses demodectic rosacea you might refer him to this page, the Demodex Mite Videos available for viewing as well as this comprehensive article and comprehensive list of medical papers on this subject

    End Notes

    [1] Image of Demodex Folliculorum courtesy of National Geographic - by Darlyne A. Murawski

    [2] Iran J Parasitol. 2017 Jan-Mar; 12(1): 12–21.
    PMCID: PMC5522688
    Human Permanent Ectoparasites; Recent Advances on Biology and Clinical Significance of Demodex Mites: Narrative Review Article
    Dorota LITWIN,  WenChieh CHEN, Ewa DZIKA, and Joanna KORYCIŃSKA

    [3] Br J Dermatol. 2014 Jun;170(6):1219-25. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12850.
    Human demodicosis: revisit and a proposed classification.
    Chen W, Plewig G.

    [4] Read end note 7 in the article, Demodectic Rosacea [Variant]

  • Posts

    • A study in 2017 [1] conducted on 'individuals with self-reported gluten sensitivity' was done to understand better "non-celiac gluten sensitivity' since it is unclear what the mechanisms or biomarker are for this disorder. So what is 'non-celiac gluten sensitivity'?   "Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is characterized by symptom improvement after gluten withdrawal in absence of celiac disease." The study concluded:  "In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of individuals with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity, we found fructans to induce symptoms, measured by the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale irritable bowel syndrome version." [1] Anyone who suggests that fructan is the issue rather than gluten to someone on a gluten free diet will without a doubt be raising some ire and shake the core foundation of their belief. After all, for years they have been told 'it has to be the gluten.' 'How can fructan be involved?' They will cry 'the study must be flawed.'  One report says, "a full 63% of Americans believe that a gluten-free diet could improve their mental or physical health. And up to a third of Americans are cutting back on it in the hope that it will improve their health or prevent disease." [2] The study used a "a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of individuals with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity" and concluded the fructan induced the symptoms.  So what is fructan? "A fructan is a polymer of fructose molecules." Wikipedia Doesn't that make more sense that a sugar is the culprit? Yes, sugar is the culprit.  For all the naysayers, there will be other studies done on this and in time gluten will no longer be the 'bad' culprit and instead recognized for what it really is, "a protein complex that accounts for 75 to 85% of the total protein in bread wheat." Wikipedia If you have Celiac Disease, "a genetic autoimmune disorder marked by an abnormal immune response to gluten proteins present in wheat, barley, and rye [which]  damages the lining of the small intestine, interfering with nutrient absorption," [3] you really do have a sensitivity to gluten. The study referred to above was conducted on those who do not suffer from celiac disease but who self-report gluten sensitivity and report doing better avoiding gluten. So those who think gluten is bad may need to re-think what they are really sensitive to.  End Note [1] Fructan, Rather Than Gluten, Induces Symptoms in Patients With Self-reported Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity
      Gry I. Skodje'Correspondence information about the author Gry I. SkodjeEmail the author Gry I. Skodje, Vikas K. Sarna, Ingunn H. Minelle, Kjersti L. Rolfsen, Jane G. Muir, Peter R. Gibson, Marit B. Veierød, Christine Henriksen, Knut E.A. Lundin
      PlumX Metrics [2] Ditch the Gluten, Improve Your Health?, by Robert Shmerling, M.D., Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard School of Medicine [3] What You Need to Know About Gluten
      BY ROSANE OLIVEIRA, US DAVIS, Integrative Medicine 
    • "Patients with rosacea also have a higher incidence of hyperglycemia, which means increased risk of SIBO due to gut hypomotility. Again, the flushing and erythrosis seen in many rosacea patients could be due to the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents including nitric oxide or TNF-α. The fact is that papulopustular rosacea and erythrotic rosacea could be due to different causes." Rosacea and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), By Liji Thomas, MD, News Medical
    • "Praxis Biotechnology is developing a medication to reduce inflammation associated with rosacea without affecting the rest of the body." Albany biotech startup wins $50K at business competition, By Madison Iszler, Albany Times Union
    • I found this article in the Houston Chronicle interesting since I take a 81 mg enteric coated Aspirin every day:  "Q: This is a true story. In the 1950s, my grandmother was taking a "heart pill" her doctor had prescribed. The older doctor retired, and Granny went to see the new doctor to get her heart pill refilled. The young doctor told her: "Mrs. G., this is nothing but aspirin. There is nothing wrong with your heart." He refused to refill her heart pill. Three weeks later she died of a heart attack. That was in the 1950s, before any research had been done on the effects of aspirin and the heart. A: It took decades for the medical profession to recognize how useful aspirin could be in preventing heart attacks. A recent Swedish study discovered that people who discontinued low-dose aspirin were 37 percent more likely to have a hospitalization, heart attack or stroke (Circulation, online, Sept. 26, 2017). The investigators suggest that there may be rebound blood clotting when aspirin is stopped suddenly. Other research also has shown a link between aspirin discontinuation and serious cardiovascular events. If people need to stop aspirin prior to surgery or because of side effects, they should do so under careful medical supervision." Sudden discontinuation of aspirin could create serious issues
      By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Houston Chronicle
    • A PRACTICAL UNDERSTANDING OF ROSACEA
      PART 1:
      HEAT REGULATION AND THE
      WARM ROOM FLUSH PHENOMENON
      By Colin Dahl
      Chief Scientist, Australian Sciences
×