Jump to content
  • Demodectic Rosacea

    Demodectic Rosacea is a rosacea variant, just as valid a variant as Granulomatous Rosacea.

     demodex.jpg Demodex Folliculorum [1]

    "The Demodex mite is beginning to be accepted as one of the triggers of this inflammatory cascade, and its proliferation as a marker of rosacea; moreover, the papulopustules of rosacea can be effectively treated with topical acaricidal agents. Demodex proliferation appears to be a continuum process in rosacea, and may not be clinically visible at the onset of the disease." [2]

    The RRDi is the only non profit organization for rosacea that has officially recognized Demodectic Rosacea as a variant of rosacea. "Recently human primary demodicosis has been recognized as a primary disease sui generis and a clinical classification has been proposed. A secondary form of human demodicosis is mainly associated with systemic or local immunosuppression." [3] This is referring to a paper published in 2014 "to classify human demodicosis into a primary form and a secondary form." [4] While acknowledging the work of Dr. Chen and Dr. Plewig, whether you refer to demodicosis or demodectic rosacea we are referring to the same condition. The term 'demodectic rosacea' was coined by Dr. Plewig in an email to the RRDi on March 2, 2007 where Dr. Plewig wrote, "Concerning your questiones, demodicosis can be a disease by itself and thus being independent of rosacea. Or demodex mites heavily colonize pre-existing rosacea and thus lead to demodectic rosacea (rosaceiform dermatosis). This is a rather complicated issue. Rosacea is usually diagnosed by inspection [of] the eye. Laboratory tests are rarely needed, for instance in gram-negative rosacea, where one needs bacteriology. The same is true for demodectic rosacea, where one has to demonstrate the mites in great numbers." [5] The RRDi has simplified this complicated issue by calling it demodectic rosacea, a variant of rosacea.

    Current concepts on rosacea is a video presentation by the Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin with Frank Powell, MD who interviews Fabienne Fortan, MD, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium explaining demodectic rosacea:

    Demodetic Rosacea has a long history of controversy which continues to this day. For example, note the following quote:
    "From these and other statements it is seen that in suggesting the thought that these minute forms of life are etiological factors in even some of the phases of acneform diseases, I shall be but little in accord with the highest authorities. In antagonism to these views, I may say that the results of my observations appear to indicate a close relationship of the parasites with the diseased condition."
    Demodex Folliculorum in Diseased Conditions of the Human Face
    Proceedings of the American Society of Microscopists, Vol. 8, 1886, page 123, Published by: Wiley-Blackwell

    For a comprehensive article on demodectic rosacea and why it is considered a rosacea variant click here.

    Dr. Leyda Bowes discusses demodectic rosacea (demodicosis) in this short video: 

     

    If your dermatologist dismisses demodectic rosacea you might refer to this page, the Demodex Mite Videos available for viewing as well as this comprehensive article and comprehensive list of medical papers on this subject. Also we have an extensive category on demodectic rosacea here: 

    Forum Home >  Forums >  Public Forum >  Rosacea Topics > Demodectic Rosacea

    Demodex Update • Soolantra

    Just think if 10K members of the RRDi each donated one dollar and insisted on supporting a reputable clinician to study what they wanted, supporting their own research, what might be discovered? This can only happen if enough rosaceans like you want it to happen. Or you can continue to do nothing and let the skin industry status quo research continue on. If you want independent rosacea research you can help. [6]

    End Notes

    [1] Image of Demodex Folliculorum courtesy of National Geographic - by Darlyne A. Murawski

    [2] Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2020 Oct 23;:
    The Pathogenic Role of Demodex Mites in Rosacea: A Potential Therapeutic Target Already in Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea?
    Forton FMN

    [3] Iran J Parasitol. 2017 Jan-Mar; 12(1): 12–21.
    PMCID: PMC5522688
    Human Permanent Ectoparasites; Recent Advances on Biology and Clinical Significance of Demodex Mites: Narrative Review Article
    Dorota LITWIN, WenChieh CHEN, Ewa DZIKA, and Joanna KORYCIŃSKA

    [4] Br J Dermatol. 2014 Jun;170(6):1219-25. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12850.
    Human demodicosis: revisit and a proposed classification.
    Chen W, Plewig G.

    [5] Read end note 7 in the article, Demodectic Rosacea [Variant]

    [6] Rosacea Research in Perspective of Idiopathic Diseases
    Rosacea Research in Perspective of Funding



  • Posts

    • Arch Dermatol Res. 2021 Sep 14. doi: 10.1007/s00403-021-02277-0. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections have become the most popular noninvasive cosmetic procedures performed worldwide. With growing interest, investigators continue to uncover an expanding array of aesthetic indications for BTX-A. Botulinum toxin A has been used off-label in the management of masseter hypertrophy for facial slimming, platysmal bands, nasal 'bunny' lines, perioral rhytides, gummy smile and scars, to name a few. Interestingly, the injection of multiple microdroplets of dilute BTX-A into the dermis, sometimes referred to as 'microbotox', has been investigated as a tool for facial rejuvenation. A handful of prospective studies and case series have demonstrated the benefit of BTX-A in the treatment of facial erythema and improving skin texture. The aim of this review is to summarize and appraise currently available data on the role of BTX-A in treating facial erythema and skin quality, with a special focus on potential pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:34519860 | DOI:10.1007/s00403-021-02277-0 {url} = URL to article
    • Dermatology. 2021 Sep 7:1-6. doi: 10.1159/000518220. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The prevalence and impact of pruritus, pain, and other sensory symptoms in skin diseases are poorly known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of these symptoms with dermatoses and their association with depression using data from the "Objectifs Peau" survey. METHODS: A representative sample of 20,012 French individuals was created using the usual quota method. RESULTS: When patients suffered from both pruritus and skin pain, they had a higher relative risk of psychological suffering (2.9) than those who suffered only from pruritus (1.4) or skin pain (1.2). Pruritus was reported in 48.55% of patients with acne, 43.24% with mycoses, 44.35% with warts, and 36.51% with rosacea. For skin pain, the results were 11.22%, 27.59%, and 16.13% for atopic dermatitis, acne, and warts, respectively. Other unpleasant sensations, such as tingling or burning, were also frequently reported. CONCLUSION: Pruritus, pain, or other sensory symptoms were found to be common not only in classic pruritic skin diseases but also in acne, rosacea, or warts. The association of pruritus and pain dramatically increased psychological suffering. These symptoms must be systematically searched for in patients, especially since new therapeutic possibilities are emerging for the symptomatic treatment of pruritus. PMID:34515100 | DOI:10.1159/000518220 {url} = URL to article
  • Featured Products

  • Latest Products

×
×
  • Create New...