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    Mission Statement

    The Rosacea Research & Development Institute [RRDi] is the first non-profit organization made by rosaceans for rosacea sufferers that will collect donations for rosacea research to be performed by physicians and biomedical research scientists and includes these specific goals:

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    Goal # 1: To be the first non profit organization for rosacea patient advocacy and to find the cure for rosacea. 

    Goal # 2: To have a majority of rosaceans the right to vote who sits on the board of directors.

    Goal # 3: To make this the first rosacea specific non profit organization to utilize most of the donations for research and treatment development. This is in stark contrast to non profit organizations that spend 50% to 60% of their donations on paying their staff, board of directors, conventions for professional members or to pay private contractors for services.

    Goal # 4: To allow rosacea sufferers to guide where and how the money is spent on rosacea research and be the first non profit organization to allow rosaceans to be members of the corporation. Until June 7, 2004, the date of incorporation, there had been no other non profit organization that allowed input from rosacea sufferers.

    Goal # 5: To attain a level such that the RRDi can directly impact medical articles published on the subject, information disseminated to physicians and rosacea sufferers and apply positive pressure on the medical community.

    Goal #6: Continue to publish the Journal of the RRDi and fund all authors who contribute an article.

    Goal #7: To allow volunteer members to have a platform to voice their concerns about rosacea and to contribute information about rosacea. Our goal is 10K members. 

    For more information on how and why this non profit organization for rosacea was formed click here.

    Our Charter can be read by clicking here.

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  • Posts

    • Very good post. I also have been researching and trying to find out the ways in which mite-bacterial interaction as well as viral interaction in rosacea exacerbate the condition of inflammation.
    • Related Articles Methods for extraction and ex-vivo experimentation with the most complex human commensal, Demodex spp. Exp Appl Acarol. 2019 Dec 13;: Authors: Clanner-Engelshofen BM, French LE, Reinholz M Abstract Demodex spp. mites are the most complex organisms of the human skin microbiome and were discovered more than 175 years ago, yet only little basic research is published about them. As they can be pathophysiologically relevant ectoparasites associated with rosacea, pityriasis folliculorum, and other inflammatory skin diseases, more research should be encouraged. Being a large microorganism or a tiny animal, there are no established basic methods to handle these mites. Here, we describe techniques enabling the extraction of Demodex mites from human skin, their analysis in different ex-vivo settings, the lysis of their exoskeleton, their preservation by freezing, and observation microscopically using specific fluorescent dyes or their inherent autofluorescence. These procedures should facilitate future Demodex research and fuel further the generation of knowledge. Furthermore it is intended to ultimatively enable the mite's cultivation in vitro and reveal its pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID: 31834574 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] {url} = URL to article
    • image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Acne Vulgaris is a completely different disease from rosacea, but many authoritative sources report that acne vulgaris can co-exist with rosacea.[1] In past literature, acne rosacea was used to describe adult acne. [2] However, rosacea is generally confined to the facial area while acne can be not only on the facial area but also on the trunk. Treatments for acne usually irritate or exacerbate rosacea and is one of the differentiating diagnostic marker for a rosacea diagnosis. [3] [1] "It should be noted, however, that it is possible for acne vulgaris and rosacea to appear at the same time in the same patient." Medscape [2] “It is interesting that the original term for rosacea was “acne rosacea”, which has more features in common with acne than currently realized. If the “acne” portion had been retained in the later works, rosacea might have received much greater investigative attention.” A Personal Critique on the State of Knowledge of Rosacea Albert M. Kligman, M.D., Ph.D. Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A. [3] What is the difference between acne and rosacea?
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