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Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Oxymetazoline Cream Following Topical Facial Administration for the Treatment of Erythema Associated With Rosacea.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2018 Feb 01;17(2):213-220

Authors: Kuang AW, DuBois J, Attar M, Ahluwalia G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Oxymetazoline cream 1.0% is FDA-approved for the topical treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea in adults. This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study assessed the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of oxymetazoline in patients with moderate to severe erythema associated with rosacea.
METHODS: Eligible patients were randomized to 1 of 8 treatment groups (oxymetazoline cream 0.5%, 1.0%, or 1.5% or vehicle applied topically either once or twice daily for 28 days). Pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted in patients receiving oxymetazoline. Plasma samples for pharmacokinetic assessments were collected prior to dosing and 6 times postdose on days 1 and 28.
RESULTS: A total of 356 patients were included in the safety population (oxymetazoline, n=268; vehicle, n=88). Thirty patients (11.2%) in the oxymetazoline group reported treatment-related treatment-emergent adverse events, most of which were mild to moderate application-site reactions. Oxymetazoline, at all concentrations, was generally safe and well tolerated. Mean maximum observed plasma concentrations were ≤115 pg/mL across all groups; the highest mean values for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to 24 hours following once- and twice-daily administration of oxymetazoline 1.5% were 1680 pg•h/mL and 2660 pg•h/mL, respectively. Systemic exposure to oxymetazoline increased dose proportionally with once- and twice-daily administration.
CONCLUSION: These findings support the use of oxymetazoline for the treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(2):213-220.

PMID: 29462230 [PubMed - in process]

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