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Pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of steroid-induced rosacea: an 8-week split-face clinical trial.

Br J Dermatol. 2008 Mar 20;

Authors: Lee DH, Li K, Suh DH

Background Steroid-induced rosacea is a relatively common dermatosis that is caused by the prolonged application of topical steroid to the face. Objectives The purpose of this investigator-blind, split-face study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of steroid-induced rosacea. Patients/methods Patients were instructed to apply pimecrolimus 1% cream twice daily to the involved areas of a randomly allocated half side for the first 2 weeks, and to follow this by applying pimecrolimus 1% cream to both sides for a further 6 weeks. Results Fifteen of the 18 patients completed the 8-week study. After 1 week of application, a statistically significant improvement was observed for investigator's global assessments of erythema and papules on prior-treated sides (P-side). Later-treated sides (L-side) showed subsequent improvement after use of pimecrolimus on the L-side. Likewise, a statistically significant improvement was also observed for numbers of papules/pustules on P-sides after 1 week, and L-sides showed a significant improvement after application of pimecrolimus on the L-side. Comparative reflectance colorimetric assessments revealed that DeltaL*, Deltaa* and Deltab* tended to converge to zero during the first 4 weeks. A statistically significant improvement was observed for percentage area affected on P-sides after 1 week of application. The L-side showed a significant improvement after use of pimecrolimus cream on that side. The visual analogue scale of P-sides decreased more rapidly than those of L-sides. Cutaneous side-effects were mild and transient. Conclusions This study suggests that pimecrolimus 1% cream is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for steroid-induced rosacea.

PMID: 18363758 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...p;dopt=Abstract = URL to article

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