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Cigarette smoking and risk of incident rosacea in women.

Am J Epidemiol. 2017 May 03;:

Authors: Li S, Cho E, Drucker AM, Qureshi AA, Li WQ

Abstract
The relationship between smoking and rosacea is poorly understood; we aimed to conduct the first cohort study to determine the association between smoking and risk of incident rosacea. We included 95,809 women from Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on smoking was collected biennially during follow-up. Information on history of clinician-diagnosed rosacea and year of diagnosis was collected in 2005. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate age and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between different measures of smoking and risk of rosacea. During the follow-up, we identified 5,462 incident cases of rosacea. Compared with never smokers, we observed an increased risk of rosacea associated with past smoking (multivariable-adjusted HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.16) but a decreased risk of rosacea associated with current smoking (HR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.72). We further found that increasing pack-years of smoking was associated with an elevated risk of rosacea among past smokers (P for trend = 0.003), and was associated with a decreased risk of rosacea among current smokers (P for trend < 0.0001). The risk of rosacea was significantly increased within 3-9 years since smoking cessation, and the significant association persisted among past smokers who had quit for over 30 years.

PMID: 28472217 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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  • Root Admin

What an oddity, since the study concluded, "In summary, based on a large, well-established cohort, we provide evidence in US women that past smoking is associated with an increased risk of rosacea, while current smoking is associated with a decreased risk of rosacea."

 

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